Article

Determining factors for successful adoption of dogs from an animal shelter

Population Medicine Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824, USA.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (Impact Factor: 1.56). 08/1998; 213(4):478-82.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To determine whether certain characteristics of dogs offered for adoption are associated with successful adoption.
Retrospective cohort study.
1,468 relinquished dogs offered for adoption at a local humane society.
Data regarding dogs offered for adoption were obtained from surveys completed by previous owners. Data were analyzed by use of bivariate statistics and multivariable logistic regression.
Of dogs offered for adoption, 1,073 were successfully adopted, 239 were not adopted, and 157 were returned to the shelter after adoption. Terrier, hound, toy, and nonsporting breeds were found to be significantly associated with successful adoption (P < 0.05, chi 2 analysis). Certain coat colors (gold, gray, and white), small size, and history of an indoor environment were also significant predictors of successful adoption. The correlation coefficient (0.048) indicated that only a small percentage of variance in adoption success could be explained by the multiple logistic regression model.
Animal shelter managers with limited kennel capacity may wish to periodically use surveys to determine whether the type of dog being offered to the public reflects the type of dog the public will adopt.

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    • "Authors of numerous studies of shelter records have concluded that the physical features of cats and dogs available for adoption can impact their lengths of stay in the shelters and their likelihoods of being adopted. For instance, a number of studies have shown that cats with black coats and dogs with black, brindle, or black and tan coats have longer lengths of stay and decreased chances for being adopted (Kogan, Schoenfeld-Tacher, & Hellyer, 2013; Lepper, Kass, & Hart, 2002; Posage, Bartlett, & Thomas, 1998). Recent studies conducted in New York and Florida, however, did not show a relationship between coat color and length of shelter stay "
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    ABSTRACT: To better understand factors contributing to cat adoptions, this study was used to explore a possible association between an adoptable cat's popularity on Petfinder and the cat's length of availability for adoption at a managed-intake nonhuman animal shelter. This study was also used to examine factors associated with a cat's popularity on Petfinder and the percentage of adopters who visited Petfinder before making adoption decisions. One third of adopters surveyed visited Petfinder before adopting, and half of those had viewed their adopted cats' Petfinder profiles. The number of clicks per day that cats received on the site was negatively correlated with their length of availability. Age at adoption was positively correlated with length of availability and negatively correlated with number of clicks per day. Coat color was a strong predictor of number of clicks per day and length of availability. The only variable within the photographer's control significantly associated with number of clicks per day was whether the photos included toys. Although cats' physical characteristics are strong predictors of their popularity, strategic use of toys in cats' photographs may promote adoptions of cats who are typically overlooked.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science
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    • "Puppies had the shortest LOS, and LOS typically increased linearly with age (Brown et al., 2013; DeLeeuw, 2008; Lepper et al., 2002). Finally, research has shown that purebred dogs generally have a shorter LOS (DeLeeuw, 2008; Lepper et al., 2002; Posage et al., 1998). Other factors that influence the choice of dog include behavior with people, playfulness, energy level, and health (Weiss et al., 2012). "
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    ABSTRACT: A survey was conducted to assess decisions people make when acquiring dogs, including what sources they consider, the importance of the variety of dogs available, and their willingness to travel to adopt dogs of their choice. A conjoint design was used to ask each respondent to rate his or her likelihood of acquiring a dog based on a "profile" that included attributes such as age, size, and color as well as where the dog came from and euthanasia risk. Overall, these results showed that people preferred variety and would drive distances to get dogs of their choice. The findings revealed that no single attribute drove choice, indicating that people have complex preferences and these vary widely across individuals. Nonhuman animal shelters may be able to increase their adoption rates by providing more variety and not just dogs typically thought of as "in demand" but those who represent a range of diversity through the utilization of animal relocation programs.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science
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    • "Authors of numerous studies of shelter records have concluded that the physical features of cats and dogs available for adoption can impact their lengths of stay in the shelters and their likelihoods of being adopted. For instance, a number of studies have shown that cats with black coats and dogs with black, brindle, or black and tan coats have longer lengths of stay and decreased chances for being adopted (Kogan, Schoenfeld-Tacher, &amp; Hellyer, 2013;Lepper, Kass, &amp; Hart, 2002;Posage, Bartlett, &amp; Thomas, 1998for dogs (Brown, Davidson, &amp; Zuefle, 2013;Protopopova, Gilmour, Weiss, Shen, &amp; Wynne, 2012), suggesting that community factors may play a role in adoption trends. The age of an adoptable cat or dog has consistently emerged as a predictor of length of shelter stay in a number of studies. "
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    ABSTRACT: Bull breeds are commonly kept as companion animals, but the pit bull terrier is restricted by breed-specific legislation (BSL) in parts of the United States and throughout the United Kingdom. Shelter workers must decide which breed(s) a dog is. This decision may influence the dog's fate, particularly in places with BSL. In this study, shelter workers in the United States and United Kingdom were shown pictures of 20 dogs and were asked what breed each dog was, how they determined each dog's breed, whether each dog was a pit bull, and what they expected the fate of each dog to be. There was much variation in responses both between and within the United States and United Kingdom. UK participants frequently labeled dogs commonly considered by U.S. participants to be pit bulls as Staffordshire bull terriers. UK participants were more likely to say their shelters would euthanize dogs deemed to be pit bulls. Most participants noted using dogs' physical features to determine breed, and 41% affected by BSL indicated they would knowingly mislabel a dog of a restricted breed, presumably to increase the dog's adoption chances.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science
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