ArticlePDF Available

Sexuality and Sexual Health in Nursing

Authors:
  • Independent Researcher
Article

Sexuality and Sexual Health in Nursing

Abstract

In order to provide acceptable care, nurses need appropriate knowledge, attitudes and skills. Nurse education in relation to sexuality has tended to focus on the knowledge and attitude components of sexuality, but a skills component must also be included. Experiential learning activities should be explored by nurses and nurse educators as a means of developing effective and sensitive ways of working with patients' sexuality and sexual health-care issues.
Article
Full-text available
This study sought to understand what sexuality support Australian health professionals currently provide to people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and their perspectives on what changes may better support the sexuality needs of people with SCI. Australian Health professionals who had worked with people with SCI within the last 10 years were invited to participate in an online survey. Results were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics. The 39 participants were from a range of health professions including medical, allied health, nursing, and peer support. Participants worked in various service settings, with the highest frequency in the community (33%) or inpatient rehabilitation (28%). Analysis indicated 85% of participants had provided sexuality support, however this provision was rarely routine. Discussing sexuality education topics were reported to be routinely provided for less than 16% of participants. Overall, 32% of participants felt sexuality was addressed ‘not well at all’ in their workplace. Qualitative analysis of open-ended responses produced five themes: barriers to supporting sexuality, health professionals require training, utilizing a team approach, responsibility to initiate conversation , and involving others in support. Barriers to provision included stigma and lack of education. Commonly suggested strategies to improve practice included: increasing sexuality training, utilizing a team approach, initiating the conversation of sexuality early, and consensual inclusion of significant others in sexuality support. The results therefore indicate sexuality support is not routinely provided to people with SCI and findings suggest a need for sexuality training, utilizing a team approach, initiating the conversation, and including significant others.
Chapter
The combined disciplines of obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) are committed to the reproductive physiology of women’s health throughout the lifespan and include an integration of medical and surgical care. Ob-Gyn providers attend to the social, physiological, environmental, and genetic factors that influence or exacerbate health conditions in women. As such, Ob-Gyns’ expertise in and attention to diverse factors that influence the physical health of women makes medical family therapists (MedFTs) a logical partner for integrated behavioral healthcare (IBHC). Both disciplines train providers to recognize and care for the unique biopsychosocial-spiritual (BPSS) health needs (Engel, 1977, 1980; Wright, Watson & Bell, 1996) of each patient over the lifespan and in the context of her family system. Furthermore, both disciplines include training in their respective areas across prevention, health education, assessment, diagnostics, and intervention.
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: The contribution of nurses in improving the quality of life of patients with cancer has caused them to have needs of getting knowledge and skills to provide services on psychosexual health care. Training on psychosexual health care has been developed, implemented and given to oncology nurses in Indonesia in order to fulfill the needs so that the nurses are able to provide psychosexual health care to cancer survivors and their spouse. Method: The training utilized a method of pre- and post-test evaluation to identify outcomes including changes of evaluation scores of knowledge, belief, practice, and self-efficacy of trainees before and after receiving psychosexual health care training. Result: The training has been implemented on 46 oncology nurses in Indonesia so that they can have knowledge, practice, belief and self-efficacy in providing psychosexual health care to patients with cancer and their spouse. After training and mentorship had been provided, there were significant changes on knowledge, belief and self-efficacy in providing psychosexual health care services to patients with cancer and their spouse; however, there were no significant changes on practices. Discussion: The training has become a standard nursing care for cancer in Indonesia and has provided scientific evidences that nurses have contribution in improving quality of life of patients with cancer by providing a comprehensive nursing care through implementation of psychosexual health care in their daily nursing care for patients with cancer and their spouse. Keywords: Psychosexual health care, training, nursing, cancer
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores sexual decision making in relation to early parenthood amongst black and minority ethnic (BME) young parents in England. It is based on research funded by the Teenage Pregnancy Unit (formerly in the Department of Health) at the Department for Education and Skills in England. Data were collected using focus groups and semi-structured interviews, and analysed using the 'framework' method. Eighty-eight young people, 10 mothers of the young people and 41 service providers participated in the study. The findings presented here relate to patterns of sexual decision making that precede early pregnancy, and to young parents' immediate responses to pregnancy. The findings organised into four domains: contraception, precursors to pregnancy, reactions to pregnancy, family and service support to young parents. The findings indicate that BME young people in this study shared some commonality of experience with the general population of young white British people who become parents early, such as aspects of sexual decision making, decisions around contraception, timing of sexual intercourse and choice of partner. One of the key findings was the level of acceptance and adjustment to becoming parents, which contradicted the negative assumptions usually attributed to teenage pregnancy and early parenthood.
Chapter
The Changing Awareness of Sexuality in Acute IllnessDimensions of Sexuality, Power and Acute IllnessSexual Function and Acute IllnessSexuality and Research into Other Acute ConditionsStrategies for Encouraging Awareness of Sexual Health Needs in Acute SettingsThe Importance of Sexual Identity and the Acute Illness ExperienceConclusion References
Article
Aim. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the importance of sexual health promotion strategies for women with bipolar disorder in order to stimulate interest and debate in this area of care. Background. Sexual health promotion is an important aspect of holistic nursing care. However, the literature indicates that nurses are reluctant to discuss sexual health and sexual behaviour with their clients. People with bipolar disorder warrant special consideration with regards to sexual health because the nature of the manic, or hypomanic, mood state is associated in some cases with sexually risky behaviour. For women with bipolar disorder, the associated risks include the threat of unplanned pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases. To ignore sexual health and sexual behaviour in mental health care increases the vulnerability of women who may already be at risk of sexual exploitation. Case example. A brief case example is included to demonstrate how the sexual health of a young woman with bipolar disorder was promoted. The sexual health promotion that was incorporated into her care enabled her to make a choice about appropriate contraception, and also provided her with the opportunity to explore acceptable boundaries in different types of interpersonal relationships. As a result of the episodic nature of Bipolar disorder, it is impossible to state whether the positive outcomes from this strategy will be enduring or not. Conclusion. Consideration of sexual health is an essential element of the care of women with Bipolar disorder. To ignore it is to neglect an important sphere of human behaviour that can be affected by the condition.
Article
Introduction. No widely accepted tool is available to assess nursing interventions on patient's sexual health among nursing students. Consequently, nursing school faculty cannot determine the sexual healthcare-related skills of nursing students. Aim. The aim of this article was to develop and test a scale to assess nursing interventions on sexual health. Methods. A 19-item instrument Nursing Interventions on Sexual Health (NISH) was developed using 10 semi-structured interviews of senior nursing students, expert review, and comparative analysis of text and field notes. A total of 198 senior nursing students were recruited from two nursing schools in central Taiwan to test the instrument. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to measure construct validity and Cronbach's alpha to measure internal consistency. Main Outcome Measures. Validity and reliability of the NISH scale based on the Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestion, and Intensive Therapy (PLISSIT) model. Results. Three factors (permission, limited information, and specific suggestion) were retained after EFA of the 19 items of NISH. Cronbach's alpha for the subscales increased from 0.71–0.93 to 0.74–0.94 and from 0.93 to 0.95 for the total scale, with 72.42% of the cumulative variance explained by these three factors. Nursing students' age (P = 0.019) correlated positively with total score. Conclusions. NISH is a useful and reliable scale for assessing the frequency of PLISSIT-related behaviors used by nursing students to address patient's sexual health concerns. Nursing faculties can use this scale to assess students' performance and find their omitted behaviors in clinical practice regarding sexual health care. Huang C-Y, Tsai L-Y, Liao W-C, and Lee S. Nursing interventions on sexual health: Validation of the NISH scale in baccalaureate nursing students in Taiwan. J Sex Med **;**:**–**.
Article
The World Health Organisation first identified, in 1975, the need for health professionals to be educated in the area of sexuality. Since then, studies exploring aspects of educational preparation of general nurses in relation to sexuality, found that there was an 'absence' of education in this area of practice. This paper reports findings on the educational discourses that shape mental health nurses' understandings of sexuality. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 27 consenting mental health nurses working in the Republic of Ireland. Data were analysed using the principles of Grounded Theory. Findings suggest that participants were exposed to a subtle network of legitimised sexual discourses during primary, secondary, and professional socialisation. These discourses provided participants with a view of sexuality that emphasised taboo, privatisation, pathology, and control. Social, political, or rights-based discourses that could have provided participants with the knowledge and clinical competence necessary to include sexuality in an open and confident manner within the horizons of nursing practice were absent. These findings challenge educators involved in curriculum development to rethink the fundamental philosophy that is shaping mental health nursing curricula. They also challenge educators to rethink their ideas around the meaning of 'absence' in relation to education.
Article
Men attending the Andrology Laboratory for the first time were asked to complete questionnaires regarding their employment, lifestyle, diet and infancy for the Chemicals and Pregnancy Study UK (CHAPS-UK) research study. CHAPS-UK is a multi-centre study investigating reasons for male infertility. During one interview, a patient expressed concerns about his sexual relationship with his wife. Initially, he described his concerns about infertility but as the nurse used her counselling skills, the patient was able to voice his psychosexual difficulties. This was the first time in 5 years of marriage the patient talked about his situation to another person. The research nurse was able to combine good communication and counselling skills to facilitate the patient's need to face his problem, which enabled him to make a constructive decision about his need for further help. This case highlights the difficult situation in which fertility nurses can find themselves and reinforces the need for nurses involved in the care of infertile couples to have training in counselling skills and the ability to make appropriate referral to an infertility counsellor when required.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.