Article

Depression, illness perception and coping in rheumatoid arthritis

Department of Psychological Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, University of Manchester, UK.
Journal of Psychosomatic Research (Impact Factor: 2.74). 03/1999; 46(2):155-64. DOI: 10.1016/S0022-3999(98)00073-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to establish the relationship between depression, illness perception, coping strategies, and adverse childhood events in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Sixty-two out-patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Illness Perception Questionnaire, London Coping with Rheumatoid Arthritis Questionnaire, and Childhood Development Questionnaire, and underwent a clinical assessment of their physical state. Depressed patients were more disabled than the nondepressed, had a more negative view of their illness, and used more negative coping strategies. There was no association between depression and childhood adversity. Once disability was controlled for, there continued to be a significant correlation between depression and: (i) viewing the consequences of the illness negatively (Spearman's correlation coefficient [r]=0.37, p=0.003); and (ii) the perceived ability to control the illness (r= -0.26, p=0.04). The relationship between depression and negative coping strategies became insignificant. This study indicates the close relationship between depression and a negative view of the illness.

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    • "Although most research has focussed on illness representations in patients, understanding illness perceptions in those caring for someone with a chronic illness is considered equally important (Weinman et al., 1997). Carers' illness perceptions can offer insight in terms of how they cope with caring duties (Heijmans, 1998, 1999) and can predict both carers' own psychological adjustment (Murphy et al., 1999) and how well patients adapt to the disease (Heijmans, 1999). The first aim of this study was to describe illness perceptions in family carers of people with dementia. "
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to describe illness representations in dementia caregiving and examine the relationship between illness perceptions and carers' sense of coherence. Illness perceptions were assessed by the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. We measured sense of coherence, symptoms of anxiety and depression and carer burden. Regression analyses indicated that after controlling for demographic factors, burden and psychological distress in carers, illness coherence and emotional responses to the disease independently contributed towards explaining variance in carers' sense of coherence. Results provide support for the usefulness of the self-regulation model in understanding dementia caregiving.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Health Psychology
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    • "The management of SLE is complex and requires treatment adherence and significant lifestyle adjustment. It is important to consider subjective illness representations, based on implicit beliefs, which influence the individual's manner of coping with the disease and adherence to treatment and affect psychological well-being [2] [3]. The role of emotion regulation has recently received attention in psychological research and has been recognized by many authors as a relevant addition to existing psychological concepts in the interface between psychology and health [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Alexithymia and depressive mood have been described as important dimensions of several medical diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic condition characterized by unpredictable clinical manifestations. The relationships between alexithymia, depression, and illness perception were examined in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The interrelationships between psychological factors, such as alexithymia and depressive mood, were explored in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, and associations between these factors and illness perception in SLE were examined. We hypothesized that alexithymia and negative perceptions of illness would be associated in SLE patients, and depression would mediate this relationship. Methods Subjects were 100 consecutive systemic lupus erythematosus patients attending the outpatient clinic at the University of Pisa rheumatology unit. They completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire. Clinical variables were measured, disease activity was evaluated using the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measure, and damage was assessed using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index. Results There were no associations between clinical variables, alexithymia, and depression. The results highlight the existence of significant links between alexithymia and illness perception for systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Moreover, our data suggest that some of these links are mediated by depression, which is the direct predictor of different aspects of perceived health. Conclusion Our findings suggest that studying the role of psychological factors, such as alexithymia and depression, may contribute to a more comprehensive perspective of systemic lupus erythematosus, including their impact on patients' beliefs about treatment effectiveness and emotional adaptation to chronic disease.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Comprehensive psychiatry
    • "The management of SLE is complex and requires treatment adherence and significant lifestyle adjustment. It is important to consider subjective illness representations, based on implicit beliefs, which influence the individual's manner of coping with the disease and adherence to treatment and affect psychological well-being [2] [3]. The role of emotion regulation has recently received attention in psychological research and has been recognized by many authors as a relevant addition to existing psychological concepts in the interface between psychology and health [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13]. "

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