Article

Air quality monitoring during indoor Monster Truck and car demolition shows

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Abstract

This article describes the results of air quality monitoring in an indoor ice skating rink during three Monster Truck and car demolition exhibitions, and the public health study that was carried out. The exposure of the people present to carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide was continuously monitored in order to determine the time-weighted average concentrations and the maximum peaks. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations were generally under the limit of detection of the device (0.5 ppm). However, carbon monoxide levels exceeded standards for workers. Maximum time-weighted average concentrations during the exhibitions were 100 parts per million with several peaks exceeding 200 parts per million (maximum value: 1600 parts per million). Recommendations were made and during a subsequent event, the carbon monoxide concentrations were reduced to protect health. Indoor exhibitions of motorized vehicles generate significant amounts of combustion gases, which can be a health hazard. There must be sufficient ventilation and the carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide concentrations must be monitored. In addition, the motors of the most polluting vehicles should be adjusted before the events in order to limit the emission of combustion products. If these steps are not met, the events should be held outdoors.

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