Literature Review

Unconventional dentistry: Part I. Introduction

Article· Literature ReviewinJournal (Canadian Dental Association) 66(6):323-6 · July 2000with 38 Reads
Source: PubMed
Abstract
This is the first in a series of five articles providing a contemporary overview and introduction to unconventional (alternative) dentistry (UD) and correlation with unconventional (alternative) medicine (UM). UD is analogous to and conceptually inseparable from UM. Dentists should learn about UD and UM and be aware of evidence on the safety and effectiveness of treatments and procedures. While being skeptical of promotions, dentists should be able to accept and encompass science-based advances and reject unproven and disproven methods. Incorporating selected unconventional methods with conventional dentistry in selected patients for specific purposes may be useful to both patients and dentists. Improved education in critical thinking, research, science, medicine, behaviour, communication and patient management is needed.
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  • Article
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  • Article
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  • Article
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Literature Review
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  • Holistic dentistry: principled philosophy or scam?
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