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Compendium of Physical Activities: an Update of Activity Codes and MET Intensities

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  • Gramercy Research Group

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We provide an updated version of the Compendium of Physical Activities, a coding scheme that classifies specific physical activity (PA) by rate of energy expenditure. It was developed to enhance the comparability of results across studies using self-reports of PA. The Compendium coding scheme links a five-digit code that describes physical activities by major headings (e.g., occupation, transportation, etc.) and specific activities within each major heading with its intensity, defined as the ratio of work metabolic rate to a standard resting metabolic rate (MET). Energy expenditure in MET-minutes, MET-hours, kcal, or kcal per kilogram body weight can be estimated for specific activities by type or MET intensity. Additions to the Compendium were obtained from studies describing daily PA patterns of adults and studies measuring the energy cost of specific physical activities in field settings. The updated version includes two new major headings of volunteer and religious activities, extends the number of specific activities from 477 to 605, and provides updated MET intensity levels for selected activities.
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... Studies were excluded if PA was not separated from generally defined "play," "leisure," or "recreational activities." PA was defined in accordance with the WHO [5], Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) [19], and Compendium of Physical Activities [20]. The WHO [5] defines PA as "any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure" (p. ...
... Similarly, the CDC [19] Glossary of Terms describes PA as "any bodily movement produced by the contraction of skeletal muscle that increases energy expenditure above a basal level" (p. 1). After consulting the Compendium of Physical Activities [20], the definition of PA was narrowed for the purpose of the current review. As such, the definition of PA was concurrent with the CDC [19] and the definition of health-enhancing PA described as "activity that, when added to baseline activity, produces health benefits. ...
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... Se procedió a la firma del consentimiento informado y se determinó el grado de sedentarismo, para lo cual se realizó una valoración de la actividad física utilizando la encuesta del estudio Ainsworth y col. (2000) 13 que describe las actividades físicas por categorías (ocupación, transporte, etc.) y las actividades específicas con su intensidad, definida ésta como la proporción de la tasa metabólica de trabajo sobre la tasa metabólica en reposo estándar (MET), así como el gasto energético en MET-minutos, MET-horas, kilocalorías (kcal) por kilogramo de peso corporal, según el tipo o intensidad de METs. ...
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