Article

Cruz, D.N. The renal tubular Na-Cl co-transporter (NCCT): a potential genetic link between blood pressure and bone density? Nephrol. Dial. Transplant. 16, 691-694

Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8029, USA.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (Impact Factor: 3.58). 05/2001; 16(4):691-4. DOI: 10.1093/ndt/16.4.691-a
Source: PubMed

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Available from: ndt.oxfordjournals.org
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