Article

The locked lumbar facet joint: Intervention using mobilizations with movement

Pinehill Hospital, Hitchin, Herts, UK.
Manual Therapy (Impact Factor: 1.71). 06/2001; 6(2):116-21. DOI: 10.1054/math.2001.0394
Source: PubMed
    • "However, despite claims of miraculous results using cervical SNAGs (Mulligan, 1999), crossreferencing of retrieved literature found no empirical evidence for the efficacy of cervical SNAGs. Literature on the efficacy of Mulligan's techniques is lacking and dominated by descriptive or case report publications (Exelby, 2001; Hetherington, 1996; Lincoln, 2000; Miller, 2000; O'Brien and Vicenzino, 1998; Vicenzino and Wright, 1995; Wilson, 2001). Other evidence points that therapeutic exercises alone reduces neck pain in the medium and long term (Chiu, Lam, and Hedley, 2005), with strengthening exercise being the most consistently beneficial program (Ahlgren et al, 2001). "
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: While studies have looked into the effects of Maitland mobilization on symptom relief, to date, no work has specifically looked at the effects of Mulligan mobilization. The objective of this work was to compare the effectiveness of Maitland and Mulligan's mobilization and exercises on pain response, range of motion (ROM) and functional ability in patients with mechanical neck pain. Methods: A total sample of 60 subjects (21-45 years of age) with complaints of insidious onset of mechanical pain that has lasted for less than 12 weeks and reduced ROM were randomly assigned to: group I - Maitland mobilization and exercises; group - II Mulligan mobilization and exercises; and group-III exercises only, and assessed for dependent variables by a blinded examiner. Results: Post measurement readings revealed statistical significance with time (p < 0.00) and no significance between groups (p > 0.05) indicating no group is superior to another after treatment and at follow-up. The effect sizes between the treatment groups were small. Conclusion: Our results showed that manual therapy interventions were no better than supervised exercises in reducing pain, improving ROM and neck disability.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
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    • "The SNAGs was effective in the treatment of locked lumbar facet joint syndrome (Exelby, 2001) as well as acute locked thoracic joint (Horton, 2002). The patient reported a 95% improvement and had maintained an upright posture. "
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    ABSTRACT: Manuscript History: The aim of the present study was to compare the effects between sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs) mobilization and manipulation in the treatment of patients with cervical spine disorders. Forty-nine male patients participated and completed the study. They were randomly assigned into three groups: SNAGs group, manipulation group, and exercise group. Patients in all groups received exercise therapy. The SNAGs group received the specialized SNAGs mobilization. The manipulation group was treated with high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation. The cervical range of motion (CROM) was measured using CROM device, with the pain assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the grade of functional recovery measured using the neck disability index (NDI). The patients received two sessions per week for 6 weeks. Evaluations were carried out before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at one month follow up. Repeated measures analysis, Friedman's test, and Wilcoxon signed ranked test respectively revealed a significant increase in ROM, pain reduction, and improved function after treatment and at one-month follow-up. The results showed significant difference in the ROM, VAS, and NDI between the exercise group and both the SNAGs group and the manipulation group. No significant difference was found between the SNAGs group and the manipulation group in terms of ROM, VAS, and NDI after treatment and after one month follow up. The SNAGs mobilization and manipulation were found to be effective treatments more than the exercises alone in the treatment of cervical spine disorders. Copy Right, IJAR, 2014,. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · International Journal of Advanced Research
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    • "The SNAGs was effective in the treatment of locked lumbar facet joint syndrome (Exelby, 2001) as well as acute locked thoracic joint (Horton, 2002). The patient reported a 95% improvement and had maintained an upright posture. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to compare the effects between sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs) mobilization and manipulation in the treatment of patients with cervical spine disorders. Forty-nine male patients participated and completed the study. They were randomly assigned into three groups: SNAGs group, manipulation group, and exercise group. Patients in all groups received exercise therapy. The SNAGs group received the specialized SNAGs mobilization. The manipulation group was treated with high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation. The cervical range of motion (CROM) was measured using CROM device, with the pain assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the grade of functional recovery measured using the neck disability index (NDI). The patients received two sessions per week for 6 weeks. Evaluations were carried out before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at one month follow up. Repeated measures analysis, Friedman’s test, and Wilcoxon signed ranked test respectively revealed a significant increase in ROM, pain reduction, and improved function after treatment and at one-month follow-up. The results showed significant difference in the ROM, VAS, and NDI between the exercise group and both the SNAGs group and the manipulation group. No significant difference was found between the SNAGs group and the manipulation group in terms of ROM, VAS, and NDI after treatment and after one month follow up. The SNAGs mobilization and manipulation were found to be effective treatments more than the exercises alone in the treatment of cervical spine disorders.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · International Journal of Advanced Research
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