Article

Predictive factors for disability pension - An 11-year follow up of young persons on sick leave due to neck, shoulder, or back diagnoses

Division of Social Medicine and Public Health Science, Department of Health and Environment, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 1.83). 07/2001; 29(2):104-12. DOI: 10.1177/14034948010290020701
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although back diagnoses are recurrent and the main diagnoses behind sickness absence and disability pension surprisingly few longitudinal studies have been performed. This study identifies predictive factors for disability pension among young persons initially sick-listed with back diagnoses.
An 11-year prospective cohort study was conducted, including all individuals in a Swedish city who, in 1985, were aged 25-34 and sick-listed > or =28 days owing to neck, shoulder, or back diagnoses (n = 213). The following data was obtained: disability pension, emigration, and death for 1985-96, sickness absence for 1982-84, and demographics in 1985 regarding sex, income, occupation, marital status, diagnosis, socioeconomic group, and citizenship. Cox regression and life tables were used in the analyses.
In 1996, i.e. within 11 years, 22% of the individuals (27% of the women and 14% of the men) had been granted disability pension. The relative risk for disability pension was higher for women (2.4; p = 0.010), persons with foreign citizenship (3.6; p=0.009), and those who had had >14 sick-leave days per spell during the three years before inclusion, compared to those with <7 days/spell (3.1; p=0.003).
This cohort of young persons proved to be a high-risk group for disability pension. Some of the factors known to predict long-time sickness absence also predict disability pension in a cohort of already sick-listed persons.

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Available from: Kristina Alexanderson, Jun 03, 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Causes of permanent work disability in the sheet metal industry are not well characterized. Methods: Pension records were used to compare causes of disability among sheet metal workers and the U.S. working population. Subgroup analysis examined the major causes of sheet metal worker disability. Results: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), circulatory disease, and injuries were leading causes of sheet metal worker disability (47.2%, 13.7%, 10.9% of awards, respectively). Award distribution differed from the U.S. working population (P < 0.0001); MSDs and injuries accounted for higher proportions of sheet metal worker awards, particularly at spine, shoulder, and knee. Conclusions: Higher proportions of awards caused by MSD or injury among sheet metal workers may reflect higher rates of work-related injuries and MSDs, a high likelihood of disability with construction work given the same impairment, or higher prevalence of other conditions in the general population. Prevention requires task-specific ergonomic innovations and proven participatory interventions. Am. J. Ind. Med. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American Journal of Industrial Medicine
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    • "Individuals experiencing back and neck pain in their teens are at increased risk of similar symptoms later in life [13]. The costs related to neck pain are substantial [14], and young adults sick-listed for NSP or back diagnoses are at high risk of being granted disability pension awards [15]. Health care services may be an important venue for identifying NSP and co-occurring factors, with the possibility of preventive treatment efforts. "
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    ABSTRACT: Neck and shoulder pain is frequent in adolescents, and multiple factors seem to affect the risk of such symptoms. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in Norwegian adolescence and to examine whether behavioral and emotional factors were associated with the risk of neck and shoulder pain. Finally we aimed to investigate whether neck and shoulder pain was related to the use of health services. Data from the population-based study ung@hordaland were used. Participants were asked how often during the last 6 months they had experienced neck and shoulder pain. The association between frequent neck and shoulder pain and physical activity, symptoms of depression, and screen-based activities was evaluated using logistic regression analyses stratified by gender. The relative risk of visiting health services when reporting neck and shoulder pain was calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses. Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported by 20.0% (1,797 of the total 8,990) and more often by girls than boys (p < .001). A high score of depressive symptoms was the strongest risk factor for neck and shoulder pain in both boys and girls (odds ratio = 6.14 [95% confidence interval 4.48-8.42] and odds ratio = 3.10 [95% confidence interval 2.63-3.67], respectively). Frequent screen-based activities slightly increased the risk while physical activity was protective. Individuals reporting neck and shoulder pain more often visited their general practitioner (47.1% vs. 31.8%) and school health services (24.6% vs. 13.5%). Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported in 20% of Norwegian adolescents. Symptoms of depression and screen-based activities increased the risk of neck and shoulder pain while physical activity was protective. Individuals reporting neck and shoulder pain visited health services more frequently than others.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of Adolescent Health
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    • "Individuals experiencing back and neck pain in their teens are at increased risk of similar symptoms later in life [13]. The costs related to neck pain are substantial [14], and young adults sick-listed for NSP or back diagnoses are at high risk of being granted disability pension awards [15]. Health care services may be an important venue for identifying NSP and co-occurring factors, with the possibility of preventive treatment efforts. "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Neck and shoulder pain is frequent in adolescents, and multiple factors seem to affect the risk of such symptoms. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in Norwegian adolescence and to examine whether behavioral and emotional factors were associated with the risk of neck and shoulder pain. Finally we aimed to investigate whether neck and shoulder pain was related to the use of health services. Method Data from the population-based study ung@hordaland were used. Participants were asked how often during the last 6 months they had experienced neck and shoulder pain. The association between frequent neck and shoulder pain and physical activity, symptoms of depression, and screen-based activities was evaluated using logistic regression analyses stratified by gender. The relative risk of visiting health services when reporting neck and shoulder pain was calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported by 20.0% (1,797 of the total 8,990) and more often by girls than boys (p < .001). A high score of depressive symptoms was the strongest risk factor for neck and shoulder pain in both boys and girls (odds ratio = 6.14 [95% confidence interval 4.48–8.42] and odds ratio = 3.10 [95% confidence interval 2.63–3.67], respectively). Frequent screen-based activities slightly increased the risk while physical activity was protective. Individuals reporting neck and shoulder pain more often visited their general practitioner (47.1% vs. 31.8%) and school health services (24.6% vs. 13.5%). Conclusion Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported in 20% of Norwegian adolescents. Symptoms of depression and screen-based activities increased the risk of neck and shoulder pain while physical activity was protective. Individuals reporting neck and shoulder pain visited health services more frequently than others.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
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