Article

Therapeutic and prophylactic effects of crude honey on chronic seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff

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  • Waili Foundation for Science
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Abstract

Honey has antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidants activities and has high nutrient value. In this study we investigated the potential use of topical application of crude honey in the management of seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff. Thirty patients with chronic seborrheic dermatitis of scalp, face and front of chest were entered for study. Twenty patients were males and 10 were females, their ages ranged between 15 and 60 years. The patients had scaling, itching and hair loss. The lesions were scaling macules, papules and dry white plaques with crust and fissures. The patients were asked to apply diluted crude honey (90% honey diluted in warm water) every other day on the lesions with gentle rubbing for 2-3 mins. Honey was left for 3 hr before gentle rinsing with warm water. The patients were followed daily for itching, scaling, hair loss and the lesions were examined. Treatment was continued for 4 weeks. The improved patients were included in a prophylactic phase, lasting six months. Half patients were treated with the topical honey once weekly and the other half served as control. All the patients responded markedly with application of honey. Itching was relieved and scaling was disappeared within one week. Skin lesions were healed and disappeared completely within 2 weeks. In addition, patients showed subjective improvement in hair loss. None of the patients ( 15 patients) treated with honey application once weekly for six months showed relapse while the 12/15 patients who had no prophylactic treatment with honey experienced a relapse of the lesions 2-4 months after stopping treatment. It might be concluded that crude honey could markedly improve seborrheic dermatitis and associated hair loss and prevent relapse when applied weekly.

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... It is used to heal wounds, soothe inflammation and ulceration of the skin, and it supports treatment of infections, asthma and respiratory diseases [14,23,25,26]. Studies have shown that topical application of honey can be effective in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis and prevent hair loss [14,27]. Honey has an antimutagenic effect-it protects the bladder and breasts [28,29]. ...
... Honey has a -health effect that is used in natural medicine and is also valued for its taste. It can be used as an auxiliary in the treatment of many diseases, including the upper respiratory tract, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract and urinary system [23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30]. The effect of honey depends on the raw material from which it is made. ...
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Honey is a highly valued product due to its nutritional value, pro-health and healing properties. Pollutants from the environment penetrate into nectar, honeydew, pollen and next into bee products and can cause human exposure after ingestion. Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal to living organisms. This is why it was important to determine the level of Hg in consumed honey. The aim of this manuscript is to analyse mercury concentration in honeys collected on the territory of Poland. A total of 108 samples of honey purchased in regional apiaries and hypermarkets were tested. The concentration of Hg was analysed in various types of honey (multifloral, honeydew, linden, goldenrod, acacia, buckwheat, rapeseed, sunflower, heather, dandelion, phacelia). The values of the Estimated Daily Intake (EDI), Estimated Weekly Intake (EWI) and % Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (% PTWI) were calculated. This allowed estimating the amount of Hg taken during consumption of the tested honeys. The concentration of Hg ranged from 0.01 to 1.71 µg/kg and was 0.43 µg/kg on average. A higher concentration of Hg, which was statistically significant, was recorded in honeydew honey, then in compound honeys. Honeys produced from one raw material had the lowest concentration of Hg. There were no significant differences in the concentration of Hg depending on the origin of honey. The calculations have shown that consumption of a portion (19 g) of the tested honey per week is safe for both adults and children according to the applicable standards.
... 8 Honey is more often used as an alternative treatment option for different diseases in otorhinolaryngology. 9 Honey has a strong antibacterial 10 and, to a lesser extent, antifungal property 11 and was found to be effective in some forms of dermatitis. 12,13 The effect of medical honey eardrops for external auditory canal disease and their bactericidal capacity have not been studied previously. ...
... 14 Disadvantages of common topical preparations include skin atrophy, 5 sensitization, 6,7 and bacterial resistance. 8 Honey mixture was an effective treatment in different types of dermatitis 12,13,15 and in animal external otitis and pruritus, without undesirable side effects. 16 In our study, honey eardrops reduced discomfort and mainly pruritus. ...
Article
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Eczematous external otitis is a chronic inflammatory disease and often difficult to treat. Our objective was to investigate the clinical effect and in vitro antibacterial potential of medical honey eardrops as treatment of eczematous external otitis. In a prospective study, 15 patients diagnosed with recurrent eczematous external otitis were treated with medical honey eardrops for 2 weeks. The following clinical outcomes were evaluated: visual analog scale of ear complaints, score of eczema, and eradication of bacterial infection. Furthermore, the antibacterial effect of honey eardrops against different bacterial strains was tested in vitro. Treatment resulted in less discomfort and itching and decreased signs of eczema, with high patient satisfaction and without adverse reactions. Honey eardrops showed a strong in vitro inhibitory activity against all tested strains but did not eradicate Staphylococcus aureus infection in vivo. The results of this preliminary study indicate a possible role of honey eardrops in eczematous ear disease.
... Honey has antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidants activities and has high nutrient value. In a clinical trial, crude honey has been demonstrated to improve SD and associated hair loss and prevent relapse when applied weekly (Al-Waili, 2001). One of the key technologies that will provide innovative products is NE. ...
Article
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In this study, it was aimed to develop a topically applicable nanoemulsion (NE) that is expected to have an ameliorating effect in seborrheic dermatitis (SD). The main purpose of the formulation is to eliminate the disease factor, to repair the damage caused by the disease on the skin and to smooth the skin appearance by moisturization. For this reason, in vitro antimicrobial effect and in vivo effectiveness of the formulation were tested. For this aim; essential oils from tea tree, sage, cinnamon, oregano; extracts from Aloe vera, colloidal oatmeal, liquorice; vegetable oils from grape seed and sesame, and honey were used in a NE formulation. The NEs were prepared by ultrasonication method. Preliminary stability tests were applied to all formulations and then, pH, conductivity, viscosity, average droplet size, polydispersity index (PDI), and zeta potential measurements were taken on the selected NEs for 3 months. Finally, the antimicrobial effect and in vivo effectiveness of the optimum NE were tested. The average droplet size, PDI, and zeta potential value of the optimum formulation (F6P2) were 108.40 ± 0.90 nm, 0.195 ± 0.07, and-21.40 ± 1.45 mV, respectively. As a result, the moisture content of the skin increased significantly (p < 0.001), the sebum and redness values significantly decreased (p = 0.008 and 0.001, respectively) and there was no significant change in the pH of the volunteers' skin. Accordingly, it can be concluded that the optimum NE formulation developed in this study may be beneficial as a supplement for patients with SD. ÖZ Bu çalışmada seboreik dermatitte (SD) iyileştirici etkisi olması beklenen topikal olarak uygulanabilir bir nanoemülsiyon (NE) geliştirilmesi amaçlanmıştır. Formülasyonun temel amacı hastalık faktörünü ortadan kaldırmak, hastalığın ciltte verdiği hasarı onarmak ve nemlendirerek cilt görünümünü pürüzsüz hale getirmektir. Bu nedenle formülasyonun in vitro antimikrobiyal etkisi ve in vivo etkinliği test edilmiştir. Bu amaç için NE formülasyonunda; çay ağacı, adaçayı, tarçın, kekik esansiyel yağları; Aloe vera, kolloidal yulaf ezmesi, meyan kökü ekstreleri; üzüm çekirdeği ve susamdan elde edilen bitkisel yağlar ve bal kullanılmıştır. NE'ler ultrasonikasyon yöntemiyle hazırlanmıştır. Tüm formülasyonlara ön stabilite testleri uygulanmış ve ardından seçilen NE'ler üzerinde 3 ay boyunca pH, iletkenlik, viskozite, ortalama damlacık boyutu, polidispersite indeksi (PDI) ve zeta potansiyel ölçümleri alınmıştır. Son olarak, optimum NE'nin antimikrobiyal etkisi ve in vivo etkinliği test edilmiştir. Optimum formülasyonun (F6P2) ortalama damlacık boyutu, PDI ve zeta potansiyel değeri sırasıyla 108,40 ± 0,90 nm, 0,195 ± 0,07 ve-21,40 ± 1,45 mV olarak bulunmuştur. Sonuç olarak, cildin nem içeriği önemli ölçüde artmış (p < 0,001), sebum ve kızarıklık değerleri önemli ölçüde azalmış (sırasıyla p = 0,008 ve 0,001) ve gönüllülerin cildinin pH'ında önemli bir değişiklik meydana gelmemiştir. Buna göre, bu çalışmada geliştirilen optimum NE formülasyonunun SD'li hastalar için ek olarak faydalı olabileceği sonucuna varılabilir.
... In a study of bacteria in the mouth due to the properties of antibacterial honey, it proved effective in eliminating germs . It also proved the effectiveness of honey in the treatment of stomach infections in particular and the digestive system in general (Gharzouli et al., 2001;Bilsel et al., 2002;Aysan et al., 2002;Al-waili, 2001). In addition to the fact that honey is vital in the treatment of decay, bacteria that cause bad breath and peptic ulcers, it can be used as an antibiotic in tissue culture and producing a pollution-free medium if used in quantity The experiment aimed at determining the best concentration added to the medium, making the medium free of contaminants and not affecting the process of experiments significantly and proved its ability to rooting (Mehta, 2013) has stimulated honey cutting rooting more than 90% (Federal, 2017) as a natural hormone for rooting and can stimulate the formation of callus in high concentrations and dispense with the use of autoclave because this step expensive because of the cost of the autoclave and what it needs to run, seriousness of the work of this device, To the destruction of many chemical compounds and growth regulators through high temperature and high pressure, which is broken or converted to other compounds not required (Ibrahim, 2017). ...
Article
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In this experiment, honey was tested in the medium used in plant tissue culture as an antibiotic and for the production of a medium resistant to contamination and tested its effectiveness without passing traditional sterilization stages without passing autoclave phase using concentrations (1,2,3,4,6,8) g/L without autoclave and then was incubation with different explants (seeds, shot tip, callus) of castor plan. The results showed that the addition of honey to medium has a significant effect in the conservation medium of contamination without use of autoclave at the concentrations (4, 6, 8) g / L of honey where there was no contamination during the incubation period 20 days and the same concentrations that have not contaminated after incubation of the explants. While the autoclaved medium did not contaminate at all the honey concentrations, the high concentrations effected in direction explants growth and tissues in the concentrations (6, 8) g / L failed in seed germination, rooting shoot tip growth and stimulated callus growth while concentration did not appear 4g/L impact on the direction of growth in addition to being a medium resistant to contamination.
... Honey stimulates the increase of the repair tissue, improves the healing and produces the debridement (Oryan and Zaker, 1998). There could be observed that topical use of honey was efficient in the treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis and dandruff (AL-Waili, 2001). ...
Article
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The present experiment evaluates the efficacy of the topical treatment with propolis, honey and Royal Jelly of chemically induced erythema in Wistar rats. Clinical and histopathological results reveal the benefic effect of the above mentioned bee products upon erythema, with complete healing of the lesion after seven days of treatment, and with evident clinical improvements even from the third day of treatment. In conclusion, the bee products tested in this experiment may be used with good results in the treatment of cutaneous erythema, as it is a simple, efficient and biocompatible therapy.
... 3 antibacterial activity, 4,5 antifungal activity, wound healing property, burn healing property, indolent skin ulcer healing property, gastroenteritis, gastric ulcer 6 and in many skin diseases. 7 Many in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that honey possess antioxidant property. 8 There are many studies showing hepotoprotective property 9,10 of honey but there is no systematic work available to test the effect of honey on antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in rats. ...
Article
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ABSTRACT Background: Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a potentially serious adverse effect of antituberculosis treatment (ATT) regimens containing isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide. Many in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that honey possess antioxidant property and hepotoprotective property but there is no systematic work available to test the effect of honey on antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Hence present study was carried out to explore the prophylactic and therapeutic effect of honey with its antioxidant activity against hepatotoxicity induced by antitubercular drugs (Isoniazid, Rifampicin and Pyrazinamide) in albino rats. Methods: Hepatotoxicity in rats treated with antitubercular drugs (Isoniazid, Rifampicin and Pyrazinamide) was studied by assessing parameters such as Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Serum total protein, Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Serum Superoxide dismutase activity (SOD). The effect of Honey as co-administration and administration after establishment of hepatotoxicity on above parameter was investigated. These biochemical observations were supplemented by Histopathological examination of liver. Results: Honey significantly reversed changes in serum levels of AST, ALT, MDA, SOD, total protein and also histopathological changes produced by Antitubercular drugs. It was found that honey significantly prevented as well as reversed Antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity and antioxidant activity. Conclusions: The results of present study show that honey has significant prophylactic and therapeutic value against antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity. Keywords: Honey, Hepatotoxicity, Antioxidant, Antitubercular drugs
... The major use of honey in healing is the treatment of wounds, suppression of inflammation, clearance of infections and minimization of scarring (Basualdo, Sgroy, Finola, & Marioli, 2007;Bogdanov, Jurendic, Sieber, & Gallmann, 2008). Al-Waili (2001) demonstrated that topical application of crude honey could be effective in treating seborrheic dermatitis and hair loss. ...
... 3 antibacterial activity, 4,5 antifungal activity, wound healing property, burn healing property, indolent skin ulcer healing property, gastroenteritis, gastric ulcer 6 and in many skin diseases. 7 Many in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that honey possess antioxidant property. 8 There are many studies showing hepotoprotective property 9,10 of honey but there is no systematic work available to test the effect of honey on antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in rats. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a potentially serious adverse effect of antituberculosis treatment (ATT) regimens containing isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide. Many in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that honey possess antioxidant property and hepotoprotective property but there is no systematic work available to test the effect of honey on antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Hence present study was carried out to explore the prophylactic and therapeutic effect of honey with its antioxidant activity against hepatotoxicity induced by antitubercular drugs (Isoniazid, Rifampicin and Pyrazinamide) in albino rats. Methods: Hepatotoxicity in rats treated with antitubercular drugs (Isoniazid, Rifampicin and Pyrazinamide) was studied by assessing parameters such as Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Serum total protein, Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Serum Superoxide dismutase activity (SOD). The effect of Honey as co-administration and administration after establishment of hepatotoxicity on above parameter was investigated. These biochemical observations were supplemented by Histopathological examination of liver. Results: Honey significantly reversed changes in serum levels of AST, ALT, MDA, SOD, total protein and also histopathological changes produced by Antitubercular drugs. It was found that honey significantly prevented as well as reversed Antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity and antioxidant activity. Conclusions: The results of present study show that honey has significant prophylactic and therapeutic value against antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000): 177-181]
... There are studies investigating the efficacy of honey in the treatment of skin disorders including wounds, of which the effects may be caused by the in vivo immunomodulatory properties of honey (Jull et al., 2015;Naidoo et al., 2011). For example, a honey mixture (containing honey, beeswax and olive oil) was found to significantly improve the symptoms of atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, pityriasis versicolor and tinea cruris (Al-Waili, 2001, 2003, 2004). ...
Article
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Studies have shown that honeys from around the world can inhibit the growth of a range of dermatologically important microbes. In addition to reports of the antimicrobial properties of honey, a number of recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that honey is able to modulate immunological parameters related to the skin immune system. Paradoxically, both immune-stimulatory and anti-inflammatory effects have been observed. In this review, scientific research investigating the immunomodulatory properties of honeys from around the world, in relation to disorders of the skin, is evaluated. While there is sufficient evidence to suggest that honey does indeed have immunomodulatory properties, which may at least partially explain the ability of honey to promote the healing of wounds, there are still gaps in the scientific knowledge and literature. More research is necessary for a more complete understanding of the immune-modulating properties of honey and to enable the utilisation of honey as an immune-modulating agent in dermatology.
... Dandruff is one of the serious troubles in human beings worldwide, characterised by scaling of the scalp and skin. Persistence of dandruff may lead to itching and hair loss [25]. Malassezia species such as M. furfur, M. sympodialis, M. sloofia, M. pachydermatis, M. globosa and M. restricta are well recognized as a causative organism for dandruff [26,27]. ...
Article
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In this present investigation, AgNPs were green synthesised using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract. The physicochemical properties of AgNPs were characterised using UV-visible spectrophotometer, field emission scanning microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. Further, in vitro anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer efficacy of green synthesised AgNPs were assessed against Propionibacterium acnes MTCC 1951, Malassezia furfur MTCC 1374 and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line, respectively. The flavonoids present in the plant extract were responsible for the AgNPs synthesis. The green synthesised nanoparticles size was found to be ≈37nm. The BET analysis result shows that the surface area of the synthesised AgNPs was found to be 33.72m(2)g(-1). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AgNPs for acne causative agent P. acnes and dandruff causative agent M. furfur was found to be at 3.1 and 25μgmL(-1), respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of the AgNPs for MCF-7 cells was calculated as 30.5μgmL(-1) and complete inhibition was observed at a concentration of 100μgmL(-1). Finally, our results proved that green synthesised AgNPs using C. sativum have great potential in biomedical applications such as anti-acne, anti-dandruff and anti-breast cancer treatment.
... Honey is also regarded as an excellent burn salve than conventional dressings (Fig. 16.4). Other than these, honey has also been used as a cure for many infectious diseases ( Kilicoglu et al. 2006;Nilforoushzadeh et al. 2007), skin conditions such as dermatitis and dandruff (Al-Waili 2001), gastrointestinal disorders ( Prakash et al. 2008) and allergic rhinitis. ...
Chapter
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Insects, our ubiquitous neighbours, though usually villainized, are infact our best friends in many ways. Other than being a source of food, clothes and dyes, insects are also a massive potential source of medicines. While the pharmaceutical industry has looked towards nature for medicinal inspiration; mostly botanicals have been assessed, while leaving animal life, in particular insects. This is despite the fact that owing to their cosmopolitan nature and exposure to wide variety of habitats, insect biochemistry and physiology is rather unique. Their defense chemicals are rather unique and can provide us with many leads to tackle resistant bacteria as well as other major ailments. It is time for us to tap these entomoceuticals!
... Honey is also regarded as an excellent burn salve than conventional dressings (Fig. 16.4). Other than these, honey has also been used as a cure for many infectious diseases ( Kilicoglu et al. 2006;Nilforoushzadeh et al. 2007), skin conditions such as dermatitis and dandruff (Al-Waili 2001), gastrointestinal disorders ( Prakash et al. 2008) and allergic rhinitis. ...
Chapter
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As the world population increases, and the already stressed land gets additionally burdened, the axe will eventually fall on the quality as well as quantity of food being produced. With increased numbers of mouths to feed, there is need to search for viable options. Insects can form one such excellent source of nutrition, which is superior to many existing sources. Not only insects are historically and culturally a major part of human diets, they are also nutritionally richer, easier to rear, and better for the environment. They are the easiest source of food for us in the future, a realization that is increasingly becoming imminent. This chapter is a step in the direction of creating awareness of how entomophagy is essential and needs to be encouraged.
... This responsiveness is owing to the inhibition of bacterial infection and restriction of mycological growth. Additionally, few studies revealed the treatment of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis owing to the topical application of honey (99,73). Natural honey has depicted antiviral properties, besides its antibacterial and antifungal effects. ...
Article
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Honey is a natural domestic sweet food material and chemically diverse superfluous product of nectar acquired from flowers. Owing to the presence of higher amounts of antioxidant compounds covering phenolic, enzymes, organic acids and bioactive peptides, holds a strong ability to prevent various maladies. In addition, honey has also been exploited in certain cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neoplastic and inflammatory states along with its role in treatment of copious infections and surgical wounds. Flavonoids and polyphenols are important bioactive components present in honey and have antioxidant properties. Some bioactive compounds, for example luteolin, galangin, isorhamnetin, quercetin and kaempferol are present in honey. Phenolic acids and flavonoids have important pharmacological activities such as anti-allergic, anti-biotic, anti-carcinogenic and hypoglycemic. Moreover, curative potential of bioactive components and their utilization in value added food products are also the limelight of article.
... Earlier studies have indicated different responses by Candia albicans to honey. Some studies indicated that Candia alibicans was resistant to honey ( Moussa et al. 2012) while some reports conclude the inhibition of Candida albicans at higher concentrations ( Al-Waili 2001). In present study, it was observed that Candia albicans is susceptible to honey at higher concentrations. ...
... Żaden z pacjentów leczonych miodem raz w tygodniu przez sześć miesięcy nie wykazał nawrotu, podczas gdy u 12/15 pacjentów (grupa kontrolna), którzy nie stosowali profilaktycznego leczenia miodem, wystąpił nawrót zmian chorobowych w okresie 24 miesięcy. W związku z tym wyciągnięto wniosek, że miód pozytywnie wpływa na zmiany skórne związane z łojotokowym stanem zapalnym i związane z nim wypadanie włosów, oraz może zapobiegać nawrotom choroby przy stosowaniu kuracji raz w tygodniu [38]. ...
... [42] From ancient times, honey has been cast-off by human beings as food substance as well as medicine for treating systemic diseases such as asthma, gastrointestinal, urinary, and skin diseases including ulcers, psoriasis, wounds, eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, and dandruff. [43][44][45][46] Honey consists of polyphenols that have beneficial effects on dental caries, oral cancer, and periodontal diseases. [47] It can be used to develop oral hygiene products such as toothpastes and mouthwashes to prevent dental caries. ...
... In dermatology, the use of mixtures containing honey, olive oil and bee wax is very helpful in the treatment of dermatitis and psoriasis vulgaris, as well as seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff (provided the treatment is applied topically every day for at least four weeks), by combining antibacterial activity with antifungal and antioxidant effects [88]. ...
Article
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From ancient times, honey was not only used as a natural sweetener but also as a healing agent. Many health-promoting and curative properties attributed to it are the basis for some traditional folk medicine treatments throughout the world today. Its beneficial effects in different disorders, rediscovered in recent decades , varying from its antibacterial effects and benefits in wound healing to its safe role in peptic ulcer, gastroenteritis, oncology, ophthalmology, dermatology and dental hygiene. This will be discussed in this review on the basis of a series of scientific studies conducted to investigate the therapeutic properties of this natural product.
... In our present study 80mg concentration of honey inhibits the maximum growth of Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tamarii, and Candida. The honey concentration range about 30% to 50% prohibits the growth of number of microorganisms [20]. The highest concentration of the honey samples inhibits the growth of M. gypseum while average inhibition against Candida albicans [21]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Otomycosis is a subacute or chronic fungal infection of the external auditory canal. The main fungal agents of Otomycosis are Aspergillus species and Candida species. Antifungal treatment is used universally but there has been no effective medication used for Otomycosis which opens up new treatment options including the use of the natural product. Honey is a natural product that has been widely used for its therapeutic effects and it has a valued place in traditional medicine since ancient times. The present study highlights the antifungal activities of three varieties of honey: Khadi gram Udyog honey, Apis Himalaya honey, Dabur honey against fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus tamarii, and Candida. Honey used at different concentrations 20mg, 40mg, 60mg, 80mg, and spore suspension was inoculated in Sabouraud's dextrose broth (SDB). After incubation mycelial growth was harvested and observed microscopically for sporulation. The most effective inhibitory effect of the three types of honey is showing at 80 mg and the less effective inhibitory effect was recorded in a concentration of 20mg. The present study focuses on the three honey varieties that show effective antifungal activity. Honey can be used for the development of natural antifungal drugs for the treatment of Otomycotic pathogens.
... 39 Also, honey (30-50% concentration) inhibits the growth of several pathogenic microorganisms, including C. albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida dubliniensis. 40,41 Studies of other dermatophytes show that honey acts against the Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Fig. 2 Anthocyanin profiles obtained by HPTLC. C-3-glucyanidin 3-glucoside, C-3-aracyanidin 3-arabinoside, C-3-galcyanidin 3-galactoside, Rcontrol rape honey, R1%Arape honey with 1% of chokeberry addition, R1%ABiorape honey with 1% of ABio chokeberry addition, R4%Arape honey with 4% of chokeberry addition, R4%ABio rape honey with 4% of ABio chokeberry addition. ...
Article
The effect of adding the chokeberry fruit additive to rape honey was studied with regard to the physicochemical properties and biological activity. Two samples of dried powdered fruits were used to enrich the honey (1 and 4% v/v) during creaming. The obtained products were characterized in terms of sugar content, acidity, conductivity, total phenolic, flavonoid and anthocyanin contents and HPTLC polyphenol profiles. The antioxidant properties of enriched honeys were studied in vitro (FRAP, DPPH, and ABTS) and in vivo using a S. cerevisiae model. The inhibitory effect against 5 bacterial strains and coronavirus surrogate bacteriophage phi6 was tested. The addition of chokeberry significantly modified the physicochemical properties of honey and enhanced its antioxidant potential (from 3 to 15 times). Using HPTLC analysis, the occurrence of flavonoids, phenolic acids, and anthocyanins in chokeberry enriched honey was determined. The modified honey protected yeast cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress when used as a pretreatment agent. All tested bacteria were susceptible to enriched honey in a dose-dependent manner. The antiviral potential of enriched honey against the model bacteriophage was discovered for the first time. In terms of numerous health benefits determined, honey enriched with Aronia melanocarpa fruits can be considered as an interesting novel functional food, which may increase the consumption of chokeberry superfruits.
... In our present study 80mg concentration of honey inhibits the maximum growth of Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tamarii, and Candida. The honey concentration range about 30% to 50% prohibits the growth of number of microorganisms [20]. The highest concentration of the honey samples inhibits the growth of M. gypseum while average inhibition against Candida albicans [21]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Otomycosis is a subacute or chronic fungal infection of the external auditory canal. The main fungal agents of Otomycosis are Aspergillus species and Candida species. Antifungal treatment is used universally but there has been no effective medication used for Otomycosis which opens up new treatment options including the use of the natural product. Honey is a natural product that has been widely used for its therapeutic effects and it has a valued place in traditional medicine since ancient times. The present study highlights the antifungal activities of three varieties of honey: Khadi gram Udyog honey, Apis Himalaya honey, Dabur honey against fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus tamarii, and Candida. Honey used at different concentrations 20mg, 40mg, 60mg, 80mg, and spore suspension was inoculated in Sabouraud's dextrose broth (SDB). After incubation mycelial growth was harvested and observed microscopically for sporulation. The most effective inhibitory effect of the three types of honey is showing at 80 mg and the less effective inhibitory effect was recorded in a concentration of 20mg. The present study focuses on the three honey varieties that show effective antifungal activity. Honey can be used for the development of natural antifungal drugs for the treatment of Otomycotic pathogens.
... Ancient Romans, Assyrian, Egyptians, Greeks and Chinese utilized honey as a topical treatment for wounds and skin illness. A study by Al-Waili (2001) reported that a topical application of 90% diluted crude honey showed a significant improvement of symptoms in seborrheic dermatitis patients. In another study, honey mixture treatment in combination with corticosteroids remarkably reduced the symptoms of psoriatic and atopic dermatitis patients (Al-Waili, 2003). ...
Article
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Since the ancient times, bee products (i.e., honey, propolis, pollen, bee venom, bee bread, and royal jelly) have been considered as natural remedies with therapeutic effects against a number of diseases. The therapeutic pleiotropy of bee products is due to their diverse composition and chemical properties, which is independent on the bee species. This has encouraged researchers to extensively study the therapeutic potentials of these products, especially honey. On the other hand, amid the unprecedented growth in nanotechnology research and applications, nanomaterials with various characteristics have been utilized to improve the therapeutic efficiency of these products. Towards keeping the bee products as natural and non-toxic therapeutics, the green synthesis of nanocarriers loaded with these products or their extracts has received a special attention. Alginate is a naturally produced biopolymer derived from brown algae, the desirable properties of which include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity and non-immunogenicity. This review presents an overview of alginates, including their properties, nanoformulations, and pharmaceutical applications, placing a particular emphasis on their applications for the enhancement of the therapeutic effects of bee products. Despite the paucity of studies on fabrication of alginate-based nanomaterials loaded with bee products or their extracts, recent advances in the area of utilizing alginate-based nanomaterials and other types of materials to enhance the therapeutic potentials of bee products are summarized in this work. As the most widespread and well-studied bee products, honey and propolis have garnered a special interest; combining them with alginate-based nanomaterials has led to promising findings, especially for wound healing and skin tissue engineering. Furthermore, future directions are proposed and discussed to encourage researchers to develop alginate-based stingless bee product nanomedicines, and to help in selecting suitable methods for devising nanoformulations based on multi-criteria decision making models. Also, the commercialization prospects of nanocomposites based on alginates and bee products are discussed. In conclusion, preserving original characteristics of the bee products is a critical challenge in developing nano-carrier systems. Alginate-based nanomaterials are well suited for this task because they can be fabricated without the use of harsh conditions, such as shear force and freeze-drying, which are often used for other nano-carriers. Further, conjunction of alginates with natural polymers such as honey does not only combine the medicinal properties of alginates and honey, but it could also enhance the mechanical properties and cell adhesion capacity of alginates.
... In a clinical study on seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff, topical application of crude honey (90% honey diluted in warm water) for 3 h relived the itching, scaling, hair loss, and lesions within 4 weeks. Continued use once a week thereafter for 6 months prevented relapse, while discontinuation resulted in relapse after 24 months (Al-Waili, 2001). ...
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Ethnopharmacological relevance Honey is one of the most popular functional foods, speculated to be in use since the advent of human civilization. Its health-protective activity is endorsed by many religions and traditional medicines. In Unani medicine, honey is prescribed for many health conditions as wound-healing, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, etc. In the present era, honey is gaining popularity over sugar for its myriad health benefits and low glycemic index. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive account of the biological activities and potential therapeutic uses of honey, with scientific evidence. Methodology In this paper, we have provided a comprehensive overview of historical uses, types, physical characteristics, bioactive constituents and pharmacological activities of honey. The information was gathered from Classical Unani textbooks and leading scientific databases. There is a plethora of information regarding various therapeutic activities of honey, and it is daunting to draw practical conclusions. Hence, in this paper, we have tried to summarize those aspects which are most relevant to clinical application. Observations and conclusions Many important bioactive constituents are identified in different honey types, e.g. phenolics, proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, organic acids, etc., which exert important biological activities like anti-microbial, wound healing, immunomodulatory, anti-toxin, antioxidant, and many others. Honey has the potential to alleviate many lifestyle disorders, mitigate the adverse effects of drugs and toxins, and also provide healthy nutrition. Although conclusive clinical evidence is not available, yet honey may potentially be a safer alternative to sucrose for diabetic patients.
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The data of the monitoring of the birth defects of the neural tube for 1985-2007 years from Crimean Republic Medical Genetic Center has been analyzed. The group of comparison: 127 cases of the neural tube defects. The control group: 127 cases of birth of healthy children closest by the time and place of birth (for each case from comparison group). By the method of superposed epochs the weekly values of the hellogeophysical indices (Ap index of geomagnetic activity, Wolf Numbers - index of Solar activity, interplanetary magnetic field polarity) during the gametogenesis and embryo period of prenatal development. The statistical significance of the values of heliogeophysical Indices in the comparison and control groups was calculated using the statistical Wilcoxon criterion for the independent groups. It was founded that during 12-18 days of embryogenesis embryos with neural tube defects the increased geomagnetic activity is probable, comparing with the control group. Since the forming of the major part of the neural tube defects takes place during 2-3 weeks of embryo growth, the increase of geomagnetic activity during or before this stage may be one of the ecological risk factors for this pathology.
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This chapter talks about Seborrheic dermatitis, which is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by erythematous and scaling plaques, with a distinctive distribution in scalp, eyebrows, nasolabial folds, retroauricular regions, sternum, and between the shoulder blades, areas rich in sebaceous glands. There are two forms of seborrheic dermatitis: an infantile and an adult form. It discusses about incidence/prevalence, etiology/risk factors and prognosis of the seborrheic dermatitis. The chapter focusses on the effects of topical treatment, which includes some drugs namely ketoconazole and corticosteroids. It discusses about efficacy and drawbacks of these drugs. In addition, the chapter also focuses on the effects of systemic treatments and the effects of nutrients. Finally, the chapter describes about the treatment that reduces sebaceous secretions using the drugs namely retinoids and antiandrogens.
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The present study investigates the Nephroprotective effect of honey in albino rats. Assessment of renal damage induced by Gentamicin was done by using biochemical and histological parameters.
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Since decades honey was not only used as a natural sweetener but also as a healing agent. Many health-promoting and curative properties attributed to it are the basis for some traditional folk medicine treatments throughout the world today. Honey has an effective antibacterial potential to combat oral pathogens and holds promise for the treatment of periodontal diseases, mouth ulcers, and other diseases of the oral cavity. As people are realizing that modern medicine is not the soul remedy for infections today. This review article throws a light on the evolution of Apitherapy and its clinical importance in dentistry.
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On the occasion of 290th Birth Anniversary celebration of Hon’ble Erasmus Darwin, the Department of Biotechnology, MM(DU) is going to organize ‘5th Annual meeting of IAZ’ and ‘2nd International Virtual Seminar on Recent Trends in Life Sciences and Biotechnology’ on focal theme “Strategies to Combat COVID-19, Zoonoses and Other Communicable Diseases” during 12-18 December, 2021). The seminar will provide a common platform for distinguished scientists, researchers, postgraduate and undergraduate students to understand, discuss and debate over the new developments and scientific advancements that will impact future strategies to intervene with current COVID-19 pandemic, zoonoses and various communicable diseases in human beings, ranging from a mechanistic understanding to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, therapy, response monitoring and eradication. This virtual venture will give opportunity to young researchers to present their innovative ideas and finding in the form of e-oral presentation or e-poster presentation in the young scientist categories in front of the scientific community which will be more interactive during special discussion with stalwarts and eminent personalities. The invited Chief Guest, Guests of Honour, Special Guests, Invited speakrs, delegates, young scientists, research sclolars and students of about 21 countries, 25 states, and over 40 universities have showed their interest for active participation. The organizing committee feel immense pleasure to welcome one and all on this vitual venture and thankful to every one for making the event a Grand success.
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Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) belongs to the Herpesviridae family and genus simplex virus. This virus is usually acquired during childhood and is transmitted through direct mucocutaneous contact or droplet infection from infected secretions. The aim of the present study was to compare antiviral effects of honey, royal jelly, and acyclovir on herpes simplex virus-1 in an extra-somatic environment. Vero cells were cultured in the Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) along with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in 12-welled microplates. Various dilutions of honey, royal jelly, and acyclovir (5, 10, 50, 100, 2500, 500, and 800 μg/mL) were added to the Vero cells along with a 100-virus concentration of TCID50. The plaque assay technique was used to evaluate the antiviral activities. The results showed that honey, royal jelly, and acyclovir have the highest inhibitory effects on HSV-1 at concentrations of 500, 250, and 100 μg/mL, respectively. In addition, honey, royal jelly, and acyclovir decreased the viral load from 70 795 to 43.3, 30, and 0 PFU/mL at a concentration of 100 μg/mL, respectively. The results of the present study showed that honey and royal jelly, which are natural products with no reports about their deleterious effect at least in laboratory conditions, can be considered alternatives to acyclovir in the treatment of herpetic lesions. However, it should be pointed out that further studies are necessary to substantiate their efficacy because hard evidence on their effectiveness is not available at present.
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Bee products such as honey, propolis, bee pollen, royal jelly, beeswax, and bee venom constitute important pharmaceutical and cosmetic components. Each bee product is characterized by the content of the active substance, which differentiates one bee product from another, and causes that each of them is worth using for a different skin problem. In addition, flavonoids and phenolic acids play a crucial role in influencing those products on the skin. For example, honey, propolis, and pollen are used to heal burn wounds. Moreover, bee venom called apitoxin contains active peptides and amines used in the wound’s healing process. Therefore, findings connected with wound dressing containing honey, propolis, or bee venom can be applied during wound healing therapy. Furthermore, the advantages of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics based on bee products are high effectiveness with minimal side effects. Therefore, bee products may become a new strategy in skin therapy.
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The full-length chapter titled, 'A detailed study of the effect of SARS-COV-2 vaccines on HIV patients' is published in the book 'Emerging Infectious COVID-19 and Zoonotic diseases: Causes and Therapeutic approaches' as a proceeding of the International Virtual Seminar on Recent Trends in Life Sciences and Biotechnology, 5th Annual Meeting of International Association of Zoologists held from 12th to 18th December 2021.
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Honey has been widely accepted as food and medicine by all generations, traditions, and civilizations, both ancient and modern. For at least 2700 years, honey has been used by humans to treat a variety of ailments through topical application, but only recently have the antiseptic and antimicrobial properties of honey been discovered. Honey has been reported to be effective in a number of human pathologies. Clinical studies have demonstrated that application of honey to severely infected cutaneous wounds rapidly clears infection from the wound and improves tissue healing. A large number of in vitro and limited clinical studies have confirmed the broad-spectrum antimicrobial (antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antimycobacterial) properties of honey, which may be attributed to the acidity (low pH), osmotic effect, high sugar concentration, presence of bacteriostatic and bactericidal factors (hydrogen peroxide, antioxidants, lysozyme, polyphenols, phenolic acids, flavonoids, methylglyoxal, and bee peptides), and increase in cytokine release, and to immune modulating and anti-inflammatory properties of honey; the antimicrobial action involves several mechanisms. Despite a large amount of data confirming the antimicrobial activity of honey, there are no studies that support the systemic use of honey as an antibacterial agent.
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Honey is a natural product derived from the mixture of nectar from flowering plants and the upper aerodigestive tract of the honey bee, preserved in the bee hive to become concentrated. It is a viscid, golden yellow, acidic liquid with a characteristic aroma. Honey has tremendous medicinal properties. It is a natural antibiotic, revitalizing agent, aphrodisiac, anti-stressor and hygroscopic fluid with excellent tissue healing potential. In the recent past, there has been a growing interest amongst doctors, nurses, pharmacologists, researchers and apitherapists in exploring and discovering the hidden medicinal benefits of honey. When applied to the diseased mucosa with exudates, it releases local hydrogen peroxide mediated through the enzymatic effect of the glucose oxidase present in it. The anti-bacterial effect of honey in wound care is primarily due to its hydrogen peroxide production at the tissue level. Experiences from traditional and complementary medicine and current microbiological data demonstrate honey as an anti-fungal and an anti-viral agent. Though honey is a natural product commonly used as a dietary supplement for every day use, the medicinal values are yet unexplored. In many religions, civilizations, and throughout the history of mankind, honey is described as a multispectrum agent for well-being. The most popular uses of honey in medicine are observed in the management of burn wounds, diabetic trophic ulcers, infected surgical wounds and eye diseases. The usefulness of honey was recently identified in the management of infected cancer ulcers, radiation-induced ulcers and cancer treatment related mucositis. Radiation is very commonly administered to head and neck cancer patients, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, resulting in symptomatic fibrinous mucositis. In bone marrow transplantation, the conditioning therapy with high dose chemotherapy or total body irradiation also induces severe mucositis of the oropharyngeal mucosa. Honey, being a tissue revitalizing, bacteriostatic, nutrient-rich agent, could thus be a rational agent for the management of mucositis. Honey is a hygroscopic agent that dampens pain receptors from injury, releases tissular hydrogen peroxide, prevents free radical damage and interfered with many intermediary inflammatory markers of tissue injury. Cell cytoxicity assays on cancer cell lines and on implantable tumors in animal models showed anti-cancer effects of honey with topical use. Thus, pure natural honey could improve the quality of life in advanced cancer patients. Current researches on honey primarily focus on the anti-microbial effect on resistant microbes, understanding the mechanism of action in inflammation, the re-epithelization process and in healing wounds. There are numerous unidentified components of honey with medicinal value that need further characterization. Due to the paucity of research evidence, randomized clinical trials using topical honey should be conducted in developing countries where health care resources are limited. The values of pure natural honey for topical use in human diseases are illustrated in this chapter.
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The use of honey in diabetes have been highly controversial, although studies have shown that honey may be beneficial in diabetic subject because of its low glycaemic index, other researchers have disagreed, largely because it is a source of dietary carbohydrate. This study was designed to determine the hypoglycaemic effect of honey in experimentally induced-diabetic and normoglycemic Wistar rats. Fifty (50) healthy adult rats of both sexes with average weight of 180 g were used for this study. They were assigned into two groups: Diabetic and Normoglycaemic group, each group was sub grouped into five groups of five animals each. Hyperglycemia was induced in the diabetic group by single intraperitoneal injection of 150 mg/kg b w of alloxan dissolved in cold normal saline (0.9%). 72 hours later blood sample was collected and blood glucose measured using one touch glucometer. Rats with blood glucose level greater than 200 mg/dl were considered to be diabetic.
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Problems with conventional treatments for a range of dermatological disorders have led scientists to search for new compounds of therapeutic value. Efforts have included the evaluation of natural products such as honey. Manuka honey, for example, has been scientifically recognised for its anti-microbial and wound healing properties and is now used clinically as a topical treatment for wound infections. In this review, scientific evidence for the effectiveness of honey in the treatment of wounds and other skin conditions is evaluated. A plethora of in vitro studies have revealed that honeys from all over the world have potent anti-microbial activity against skin relevant microbes. Moreover, a number of in vitro studies suggest that honey is able to modulate the skin immune system. Clinical research has shown honey to be efficacious in promoting the healing of partial thickness burn wounds while its effectiveness in the treatment of non-burn acute wounds and chronic wounds is conflicted. Published research investigating the efficacy of honey in the treatment of other types of skin disorders is limited. Nevertheless, positive effects have been reported, for example, kanuka honey from New Zealand was shown to have therapeutic value in the treatment of rosacea. Anti-carcinogenic effects of honey have also been observed in vitro and in a murine model of melanoma. It can be concluded that honey is a biologically active and clinically interesting substance but more research is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of its medicinal value in dermatology.
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Honey dressings attract attention as a therapeutic alternative for wound care due to its antibacterial, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory action. To obtain better medicinal properties, the formulation of honey requires the characterization of physicochemical and mechanical properties. This chapter aims to provide an in-depth account of the value of characterizing the honey dressing. Physical tests, such as swelling capacity, water vapor transmission rate, and thermal studies, are described. Therapeutic testings of honey wound dressings and their clinical applications have been covered. Recent developments in the formulation of honey dressings are also discussed in this chapter.
Article
Introduction Dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis [SD] are similar skin conditions but have different severities. Because the current therapies are not able to completely remove dandruff, herbal extracts with better effectiveness and fewer side effects are being used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Due to the adverse effects of chemical drugs, the use of natural products and traditional medicine has sharply increased over the past few decades. Therefore, in this review, we report herbs used as anti-dandruff agents in traditional medicine around the world. Methods The review was conducted on the literature available on the medicinal utility of certain plants as antidandruff agents using PubMed and Google Scholar and the following search terms: Dandruff and Plants or Medicinal Plant and Dandruff treatment; and Essential oil and Dandruff. Results Because the current therapies are not able to completely remove dandruff, herbal extracts with better effectiveness and fewer side effects are being used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Nowadays, there are many different types of herbal antidandruff shampoo. They are effective and safe without the side effects of chemical agents. Recently, a large number of physicians have turned to herbal medicine. Clinical evidence of the therapeutic effects from herbal products has led to the study of many more herbs for their therapeutic roles. Conclusion Herbal are now accepted to act a essential role in the development of favourable therapeutics, either alone or in combination with conventional antibiotics. However, the major challenges to this include finding compounds with satisfactorily lower MICs, low toxicity, and high bioavailability for effective and safe use in humans and animals.
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Nowadays the use of hair products to modify the look has become unavoidable. Hair products like shampoos, hairstyling gels, straight iron, curling iron etc. induce damage to the hair follicle as well as the hair shaft making them brittle, dry and causing split ends. One way of treating this is to stop the use of these harmful hair products or another way is to restore hair shine and softness by replenishing the lost/damaged sebum and keratin from the hair. This can be done with the use of conditioners. In this chapter few natural sources which can be used as hair conditioners along with their chemistry are described.
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Honey is a sweet gift of nature to mankind. It is a miraculous liquid produced from the nectar of flower by the action of honeybees. Honey provides multiple nutritional and curative benefits owing to its chemical composition and physical properties which in turn depend on floral source, geographical origin, processing, and storage. Chemically, honey is a concentrated carbohydrate solution. In addition to sugars, small amounts of minerals, proteins, vitamins, acids, and antioxidants are also present that impart biological attributes to honey, i.e., antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. These biological properties are responsible for its health-promoting effects. History of honey is as old as human civilization on this earth. Several Stone Age evidence show that the practice of beekeeping and honey harvesting was performed since ever. During ancient civilization, honey was used as a sweetener in various foods, sacred products for religious offerings, eye cosmetics, ointment to treat wounds and burns as well as medicine to cure disease and disorders of the digestive system and eye ailments. In the modern era, clinical and laboratory studies have scientifically proved the traditionally claimed nutritional and medicinal attributes of honey. Recently, honey is used in various commercially available products as sweetener, wound healing ointment, food preservative, prebiotic, in skincare products, and as medicine to treat cough and eye ailments. The present chapter is intended to provide information on multiple health benefits of honey as well as its utilization in traditional and modern culture.
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Olive oil and olive extracts have been used in folk med­icine since ancient times. Romans and Greeks employed olive extracts to treat many diseases and an extract of boiled olive leaves was administered as a drink to malaria patients during the 19th century. Hence, the Mediterranean countries have cultivated the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) to produce olive oil, table olives and olive leaf extracts for centuries. At present, both olive oil and table olives are important com­ponents of the Mediterranean diet and are largely consumed throughout the world. In addition, there are many enterprises that commercialize olive leaf extracts to treat a myriad of diseases, many of them caused by microorganisms. Recently, the importance of preventive medicine has been gradually recognized in the field of orthopaedic surgery with a concept that peak bone mass should be increased in childhood as much as possible for the prevention of osteoporosis (Ohtani et al., 2009). The aim of the current study is to explore the antimicrobial activity of olive oil against microbial infections. To achieve the aim of research, the researcher applied the exploratory approach where dozens of relevant studies were reviewed and explored in order to collect the results needed to enrich the discussion within the current study. The results of study indicated the efficiency of antimicrobial activity of olive oil against microbial infections.
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The use of honey in diabetes have been highly controversial, although studies have shown that honey may be beneficial in diabetic subject because of its low glycaemic index, other researchers have disagreed, largely because it is a source of dietary carbohydrate. This study was designed to determine the hypoglycaemic effect of honey in experimentally induced-diabetic and normoglycemic Wistar rats. Fifty (50) healthy adult rats of both sexes with average weight of 180 g were used for this study. They were assigned into two groups: Diabetic and Normoglycaemic group, each group was sub grouped into five groups of five animals each. Hyperglycemia was induced in the diabetic group by single intraperitoneal injection of 150 mg/kg b w of alloxan dissolved in cold normal saline (0.9%). 72 hours later blood sample was collected and blood glucose measured using one touch glucometer. Rats with blood glucose level greater than 200 mg/dl were considered to be diabetic. Varying doses of honey (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg b w) were administered orally once daily to both groups. The result obtained showed significant decrease (p<0.05) in blood glucose levels in the diabetic animals that received all doses of honey when compared to the control animals. The results obtained in the normoglycaemic group showed no significant difference (p>0.05) in blood glucose levels between the control and the animals administered with graded doses of honey when compared. The result of this study demonstrated that honey possesses anti-hyperglycemic activities in wistar rats and can be recommended to diabetics and non diabetics for its beneficial effect on glycaemic control.
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Th e aim of this study was to describe and quantify the therapeutic value of honey in oral mucosal ulcers healing in comparison with Glyceroloxytriester (TGO). We also aimed to biochemically evaluate the healing eff ects of honey which had been collected from the Blacksea region fl ora on mucosal ulcers resulting in material loss. Th irty wistar rats (± g) were enrolled in this study. Excisional wounds were performed in all rats for animal oral mucosal ulcer model. Th ey were randomly allocated to three groups: group  was treated with Apitherapeutic agent or honey (, ml, x), group  was treated with TGO (,ml, x) locally, Group  served as the control group. Following the surgical procedure on day , biopsy specimens were taken from right buc-cal mucosa and on day  biopsy specimens were taken from left bucal mucosa in all rats. Afterwards, hydroxy pyroline levels were measured. Data were analyzed statistically.
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While seborrhoeic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disorder often observed in infants 0–3 months of age, it is also seen in adolescents with onset at the age of puberty. Occasionally, the condition is found in toddlers and school‐aged children as well. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, it is probably a combination of individual predisposition, the presence of Malassezia yeast on the skin and inflammatory response to the yeast species. Physical examination reveals mildly erythematous patches with yellowish‐white, greasy scales, typically affecting areas of the skin with increased sebum production such as the scalp, eyebrows and nasolabial folds. The prognosis is favourable and treatment options include medications with antifungal, anti‐inflammatory and keratolytic properties.
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Honey is one of the most nutritional natural products that not only provides us healthy nutrition but also has a potential to be an alternative treatment option for different pathologies from microbial infection to metabolic disease. Honey is a byproduct of flower syrup produced by honeybees and possesses an intricate chemical composition that varies with botanical sources and geographical locations. This chapter is aimed to provide readers an understanding of complex composition, biological activities, adverse effect, and therapeutic benefits of honey. Honey possesses many biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, anti-cancer, and anti-metastatic effects, suggesting potential therapeutic roles in many human pathologies. Flavonoids and polyphenols in honey are the two active ingredients, which are of therapeutic importance in many diseases. In conclusion, honey may be developed as a natural therapeutic agent for many pathologies, and extensive studies are therefore recommended.
Chapter
Honey is the material made by mixing of nectar and sweet deposits from plants and later on modified by honey bees. Honey is one of the most appreciated and valued natural products introduced to humankind since ancient times. Honey is a nutritional material that is traditionally known for its medicinal properties. Honey is used as a traditional medicine in treating various clinical ailments from wound healing to cancer apart from being used as a nutritional product. In dermatology, honey is used in the treatment of eczema, ulcers, wounds, atopic dermatitis (AD), allergies, and much more due to its antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory properties. In conclusion, honey could be considered as a natural therapeutic agent for various medicinal purposes. Sufficient evidences recommend the use of honey in the management of disease conditions especially skin- related disorders. Based on these facts, the use of honey in clinical wards is highly recommended. However, more rigorous scientific studies are needed to confirm its benefits in health care settings especially in the field of dermatology.
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Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD) is a chronic, recurring inflammatory skin disorder that manifests as erythematous macules or plaques with varying levels of scaling associated with pruritus. The condition typically occurs as an inflammatory response to Malassezia species and tends to occur on seborrheic areas, such as the scalp, face, chest, back, axilla, and groin areas. SD treatment focuses on clearing signs of the disease; ameliorating associated symptoms, such as pruritus; and maintaining remission with long-term therapy. Since the primary underlying pathogenic mechanisms comprise Malassezia proliferation and inflammation, the most commonly used treatment is topical antifungal and anti-inflammatory agents. Other broadly used therapies include lithium gluconate/succinate, coal tar, salicylic acid, selenium sulfide, sodium sulfacetamide, glycerin, benzoyl peroxide, aloe vera, mud treatment, phototherapy, among others. Alternative therapies have also been reported, such as tea tree oil, Guassia amara, and Solanum chrysotrichum. Systemic therapy is reserved only for widespread lesions or in cases that are refractory to topical treatment. Thus, in this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge on SD treatment and attempt to provide appropriate directions for future cases that dermatologists may face.
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Commercial unboiled honey was applied topically to open wounds of 12 mice. Twelve other mice served as a control group and their wounds were dressed with saline solution only. Wound healing was judged histopathologically by measuring the thickness of granulation tissue, epithelization from the periphery of the wound, and the size of the open wounds. The animals were killed 3, 6, and 9 days from the day they were wounded and treated, and their wounds were examined histopathologically. According to the three mentioned criteria, wounds of the honey-treated animals healed much faster than the wounds of the control animals (p less than 0.001). Unboiled commercial honey seems to accelerate wound healing when applied topically due to its energy-producing properties, its hygroscopic effect on the wound, and its bacteriocidic properties. Our results suggest that honey applied topically on open wounds accelerates the healing process.
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Isotretinoin is an extremely effective drug if given systemically in severe forms of seborrhoea and acne, being the only retinoid with potent sebostatic properties. Its unique activity on the sebaceous gland still remains unclear since isotretinoin barely binds to cellular retinoic-acid-binding proteins and to retinoic acid receptors. Its bioavailability is approximately 25% and can be increased by food 1.5-2 times; after 30 min, the drug is detectable in the blood and maximal concentrations are reached 2-4 h after oral intake. The major metabolites of isotretinoin in blood are 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxo-isotretinoin, while several glucuronides are detectable in the bile. 4-Oxo-isotretinoin is present in plasma in a 2- to 4-fold higher concentration 6 h after a single dose. Steady-state concentrations appear after 1 week. The half-life elimination rate of the parent compound ranges from 7 to 37 h while that of some metabolites does so from 11 to 50 h. Isotretinoin crosses the placenta and is recognized as a strong teratogenic compound. About 10-30% of the drug is metabolized via its isomer tretinoin. Excretion of isotretinoin occurs after conjugation with the faeces or after metabolization with the urine. The epidermal levels of isotretinoin are rather low and no progressive accumulation, either in serum or in the skin, is found. After discontinuation of therapy, isotretinoin disappears from serum and skin within 2-4 weeks. Isotretinoin is the most effective drug in reducing sebaceous gland size (up to 90%) by decreasing proliferation of basal sebocytes, suppressing sebum production and inhibiting sebocyte differentiation in vivo. The molecular basis for its antisebotrophic activity has not been fully elucidated. Isotretinoin also exhibits anti-inflammatory activities. Systemic isotretinoin is today the regimen of choice in severe seborrhoea, since it reduces sebocyte lipid synthesis by 75% with daily doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg after 4 weeks. Patients who have received oral isotretinoin therapy for seborrhoea do not usually experience a relapse for months or years. In severe acne, a 6- to 12-month treatment with isotretinoin 1 mg/kg/day reduced to 0.5 or 0.2 mg/kg/day according to the response is recommended (cumulative dose of > 120 mg/kg). Contraception is essential during isotretinoin treatment in women of childbearing age 1 month before, during and for 3 months after discontinuation of treatment.
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Seborrhoea and acne are exclusively human diseases and sebaceous gland differentiation is species specific. Therefore, fundamental research on human sebaceous cell function and control requires human in vitro models. The human sebocyte culture model, introduced in 1989, has been used in several studies to elucidate sebaceous gland activity and its regulation at the cellular level. Cultured human sebocytes have been shown to preserve important sebocytic characteristics, although they undergo an incomplete terminal differentiation in vitro. In vitro synthesis of free fatty acids without bacterial involvement and marked interleukin 1 alpha expression at the mRNA and protein levels with no further induction by lipopolysaccharides lead to the assumption that human sebocytes may initiate acne lesions by an intrinsic mechanism. Androgens affected sebocyte activity in vitro in a manner dependent on the localization of the sebaceous glands. In vitro stimulation of sebocyte proliferation by androgens could be completely abolished by spironolactone. Cultured sebocytes strongly expressed type 1 5 alpha-reductase and metabolized testosterone to androstenedione, 5 alpha-androstanedione, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androsterone and 5 alpha-androstanediol, whereas the levels of 5 alpha-reductase activity were probably not feedback regulated. 4,7 beta-Dimethyl-4-aza-5 alpha-cholestan-3-one, a type 1 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, induced an early, marked down-regulation of 5 alpha-reductase activity in human sebocytes in vitro, while hydrofinasteride, a type 2 inhibitor, required 10(3)-fold higher concentrations to induce similar effects. Stimulation of sebocyte proliferation by insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone and hydrocortisone indicates that the hormonal control of the sebaceous gland could be a complex mechanism. Retinoids inhibited sebocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulated lipid synthesis and sebocyte differentiation in vitro. Isotretinoin was the most potent compound. On the other hand, vitamin A was found essential for sebocyte activity and differentiation in vitro and could be partially substituted by synthetic retinoids. The inhibitory effect of isotretinoin on sebocyte proliferation was barely affected by the presence of vitamin A. The low persistent isotretinoin levels or, more likely, the considerably elevated tretinoin concentrations detected in human sebocytes after treatment with isotretinoin in vitro may be responsible for the inhibitory effect of this compound on sebocyte activity.
Article
The present study was performed to clarify the possible causes of the antimicrobial activity of honey. A sugar solution resembling honey in its high sugar content was made. The antimicrobial activities of both honey and this solution towards 21 types of bacteria and two types of fungi were examined. The results achieved by both were compared. The difference between them indicated the presence of antimicrobial substance(s) in honey. The kinds of antimicrobial substances (inhibines) in honey are discussed. Hydrogen peroxide is not the only inhibine in honey. In fact, inhibines in honey include many other substances. Two important classes of these inhibines are the flavonoids and the phenolic acids. Flavonoids have often been extracted from honey previously. In this study two phenolic acids (caffeic acid and ferulic acid) were extracted from honey for the first time.
Article
EDITORIAL COMMENT: We accepted this paper for publication because it should interest all readers, some of whom may decide they have the occasional patient suitable for this method of honey wound care. The healed wound shown in figure (d) would be cosmetically unacceptable to most women but perhaps resuture would have had a similar result. In the editor's experience, sew sanguineous discharge from a wound postoperatively invariably means dehiscence best treated by resuture once any precipitating ileus has resolved; when the skin sutures are removed the wound falls apart in these women and usually loops of bowel are adherent to the edges of the wound (figures A and B). In the case illustrated in this paper the peritoneum appears to be intact as if the problem was an infected haematoma which is an unusual cause of wound disruption in the editor's experience; yet the authors encountered 15 cases in 19 months, and quoted no case of the complete wound dehiscence referred to above! Summary: The usefulness of honey application as an alternative method of managing abdominal wound disruption was assessed. Fifteen patients whose wound disrupted after Caesarean section were treated with honey application and wound approximation by micropore tape instead of the traditional method of wound dressing with subsequent resuturing. We achieved excellent results in all the cases with complete healing within 2 weeks. Honey application is inexpensive, effective and avoids the need to resuture which also requires general anaesthesia.
Article
The antimicrobial spectrum of honey was investigated by placing two drops into each of the wells made on culture media on which pure cultures of various organisms obtained from surgical specimens were grown. The organisms were grown under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Fungal cultures of common fungi causing surgical infections or wound contaminations were mixed with 100%, 50% and 20% unprocessed honey. Growth inhibition was complete in the media containing 100%, partial in media containing 50% and no inhibition was produced by 20% honey. Unprocessed honey inhibited most of the fungi and bacteria causing wound infection and surgical infection except Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Clostridium oedematiens. Apart from Streptococcus pyogenes which is only moderately inhibited, golden syrup, a sugar syrup with similar physical properties as honey, did not inhibit any of the bacteria or fungi tested, demonstrating that honey is superior to any hypertonic sugar solution in antimicrobial activity. Honey is thus an ideal topical wound dressing agent in surgical infections, burns and wound infections.
Article
Pityrosporum ovale appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of seborrhoeic dermatitis. Ketoconazole is an antimycotic agent with a high in vitro and in vivo efficacy against P. ovale. We performed a multicentre study to investigate the efficacy of ketoconazole 2% shampoo in the treatment and prophylaxis of seborrhoeic dermatitis and dandruff. Five hundred and seventy-five patients presenting with moderate to severe seborrhoeic dermatitis and dandruff of the scalp were treated with 2% ketoconazole shampoo twice weekly for 2–4 weeks, producing an excellent response in 88%. Of those patients who responded, 312 were included in a prophylactic phase, lasting 6 months. These patients were treated with the active preparation (shampoo containing 2% ketoconazole) once-weekly, once every other week, alternating with placebo (shampoo without ketoconazole), or with placebo only once-weekly. Forty-eight (47%) patients in the placebo group experienced a relapse of seborrhoeic dermatitis, compared with 23 (19%) patients in the active treatment group, and 31 (31%) patients in the active/placebo group. The medication was well tolerated in all three groups. We conclude that ketoconazole 2% shampoo is highly effective, not only in clearing scalp seborrhoeic dermatitis and dandruff, but also in preventing relapse of the disease when used prophylactically once weekly.
Article
Malassezia furfur is important in the pathogenesis of a number of dermatologic diseases including seborrheic dermatitis in adults. It has also recently been suggested that M. furfur might be the etiologic agent in infantile seborrheic dermatitis (ISD). We studied the presence of M. furfur in 21 children with the clinical diagnosis of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. Laboratory analyses showed aberrant patterns of essential fatty acids (EFA) in serum characterized by elevated levels of 18:1w9 and 20:2w6. Samples for M. furfur were taken from the foreheads and chests of children with infantile seborrheic dermatitis at the time of diagnosis, directly after treatment to complete healing, and after 1 year with no signs of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. All the patients were treated topically with borage oil containing 25% gammalinolenic acid (GLA). No reduced growth of M. furfur was seen on contact plates prepared with borage oil. The growth of M. furfur seems not to be related to the clinical symptoms in ISD.
Article
(i) To investigate whether there is a difference in the prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis (SD) between homo- or bisexual HIV-infected patients and HIV-infected intravenous drug users, (ii) to study whether the initial CD4 T cell count at the first positive HIV test is of any significance for the prevalence of SD and furthermore to analyze whether (iii) antiretroviral treatment influences the prevalence and time course of SD. Since 1992 we have been following, within the scope of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study, a group of individuals with proven HIV infection. In this study all HIV-infected patients belonging either to the risk group of homo- or bisexuals or that of intravenous drug users were included for further analysis. We included 226 men and 51 women. The ages ranged from 17 to 68 years (mean 30.1). One hundred and forty-four were homo- or bisexual men and 133 (82 men and 51 women) were intravenous drug users. Out of these 277 HIV-infected patients, 66 (23.8%) had SD at baseline and 7 (2.5%) developed SD during the observation period (male:female = 68:5). In our study we found that (i) the risk group influences the prevalence and time course of SD, yet that (ii) neither the initial CD4 T cell count nor (iii) antiretroviral treatment is of any significance.
Article
A randomized double-blind clinical study was conducted on two groups of 30 volunteers using either a non-tar shampoo (2% salicylic acid, 0.75% piroctone olamine and 0.5% elubiol) or a 0.5% coal tar shampoo. Subjects were diagnosed as having moderate to marked dandruff. The study consisted of a 3-week washout, followed by a 4-week treatment and a 4-week posttreatment regression phase. The clinical evaluations and subject self-assessments showed that the non-tar shampoo was as effective as the tar shampoo. Both received high approval ratings (> or =70%). Biometrological methods proved to be more sensitive than clinical evaluations to assess the efficacy of the shampoos. The non-tar shampoo yielded a significantly better reduction of Malassezia spp. counts (p<0.02) during the treatment phase and reduced the spontaneous increase in squamometry values (p< 0.01) during the posttreatment phase. It is concluded that a formulation associating salicylic acid, piroctone olamine and elubiol exhibited increased beneficial effects compared to the coal tar shampoo.