Personal View: It's only teething... A report of the myths and modern approaches to teething

ArticleinBritish dental journal 191(1):4-8 · August 2001with 22 Reads
Abstract
Paediatric dentistry is not my usual field of work. I am now based almost entirely in restorative dentistry and it is five years since I worked in the dental department of a children's hospital. An essay on teething would appear to be an unusual choice of topic. With the current professional climate of 'general professional education' and 'lifelong learning' I can easily justify my time and effort studying a subject somewhat removed from my regular work. However, to be completely honest, I have reached that age when many of my friends, relatives and colleagues are enjoying the sleepless nights that accompany expanding families. Add to this the fact that I have recently married into a family of midwives, health visitors, nurses and new mothers. I was not sure that I was giving the best, most up to date advice when asked about teething. So some reading around was required. If only it were that simple. I now feel equipped to give a little more help than simply saying, "It's only teething..."
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