Article

Adolescents' Input on the Development of an HIV Risk Reduction Intervention

School of Nursing, University of Rochester, USA.
Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (Impact Factor: 1.27). 01/2002; 13(1):21-7. DOI: 10.1016/S1055-3290(06)60238-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a developmental period often associated with sexual debut as well as risk taking. Given these considerations, HIV prevention interventions need to become an important component of adolescent health care. This article describes the use of formative research to guide intervention refinement. To refine an HIV risk reduction intervention that has been used successfully with adults, the authors conducted focus groups with 30 adolescent females. These participants identified misconceptions regarding HIV-related information and factors that influence motivation to participate in risky behaviors. They also suggested strategies for recruitment and retention in a longitudinal study. Formative research such as this can be used to develop interventions that are gender specific and developmentally and culturally appropriate for adolescents.

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Available from: Dianne Morrison-Beedy, Aug 28, 2014
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    • "A basic demographic questionnaire as well as a questionnaire generated based on the previous studies[232425] were administered to both groups at two points of time as baseline and follow-up. "
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    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of a theory-based educational intervention on intension for sexual abstinence among female university students was evaluated. Female students were recruited from humanity sciences department through cluster sampling. Educational intervention was applied for four 90-min sessions and by application of cognitive theories during 4 weeks. One hundred and nine female students with mean age of 20.74 ± 1.57 years took part in the study. Despite the similarity of two groups of intervention (n = 53) and control (n = 59) at baseline, there were significant differences between the two groups in mean scores of the variables, knowledge (4.62 ± 1.38 vs. 3.53 ± 1.61), perceived susceptibility (14.05 ± 1.51 vs. 12.37 ± 2.11), and perceived benefits (28.41 ± 2.14 vs. 27.51 ± 3.05), at follow-up time after 3 months (P < 0.05). Additionally, these variables were observed with improvement over 3 months in the intervention group (P < 0.05). However, this study showed no significant effect on the behavior intention and self-efficacy. This study showed that educational intervention could improve knowledge, perceived benefits, and self-efficacy of the female students regarding HIV/AIDS.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of research in medical sciences
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    • "The HIV Index of Readiness scale was internally consistent in previous work (alpha = .87) (Morrison-Beedy et al., 2001, 2002) and had an alpha of .79 in this study. Evidence of construct and criterion validity has been established (Morrison-Beedy et al., 2001, 2002). "
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To present the preintervention data collected for a pilot HIV-prevention randomized controlled trial specifically developed for single, sexually active adolescent girls.Design: Comparative, descriptive design using confidential self-administered questionnaires.Setting: An urban family planning clinic that provided gynecologic services to adolescents.Participants: One hundred twenty-nine single, sexually active adolescent girls 15 to 19 years of age (44% minority, 34% economically disadvantaged).Main Outcome Measures: In addition to demographics and risk behaviors, the following were assessed: HIV-related information (i.e., knowledge) and motivation to reduce risk (i.e., perceived vulnerability, readiness to change HIV risk behaviors, behavioral intentions, pros and cons of condom use, and confidence in condom use).Results: Assessments revealed limited HIV-related knowledge, ambivalence regarding risk reduction, and considerable risk behaviors. Compared with girls at lower risk for HIV infection (i.e., consistent condom users), those at higher risk (i.e., inconsistent or non-condom-users) were more likely to be White and older and to have better HIV-related knowledge but less motivation to reduce risk (i.e., behavioral intentions to use condoms, condom-use confidence) than girls at lower risk.Conclusion: These data document (a) the need for HIV prevention interventions targeted to all sexually active adolescent girls and (b) the importance of including a motivational component in the intervention.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2002 · Journal of Obstetric Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2002 · Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
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Questions & Answers about this publication

  • Dianne Morrison-Beedy added an answer in In Depth Interviews:
    What is the best rationale ethically for compensation of research participants?

    I am conducting a study that involves focus group discussions, in depth interviews and developing a testing of an intervention with study participants. This will take most of their free time due to demands of the study. I feel I need to compensate them in monetary form. How best Should I do and explain this to ensure it is ethically acceptable?

    Dianne Morrison-Beedy

    Compensation is standard in a research studies because it speaks to acknowledgment of human dignity- that those who work should be compensated for time and effort in research in the same manner they are compensated for work within our nation.I have compensated young teens based on the average hourly wage  they might receive babysitting or having a part-time job in a store or restaurant and it was really important to acknowledge that they provide data/information that are criticalto understanding the problem under investigation and need to be compensated just as adults are.

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      [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
      ABSTRACT: Adolescence is a developmental period often associated with sexual debut as well as risk taking. Given these considerations, HIV prevention interventions need to become an important component of adolescent health care. This article describes the use of formative research to guide intervention refinement. To refine an HIV risk reduction intervention that has been used successfully with adults, the authors conducted focus groups with 30 adolescent females. These participants identified misconceptions regarding HIV-related information and factors that influence motivation to participate in risky behaviors. They also suggested strategies for recruitment and retention in a longitudinal study. Formative research such as this can be used to develop interventions that are gender specific and developmentally and culturally appropriate for adolescents.
      Full-text · Article · Jan 2002 · Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care

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