Article

Rotondi AJ, Chelluri L, Sirio C, et al. Patients’ recollections of stressful experiences while receiving prolonged mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
Critical Care Medicine (Impact Factor: 6.31). 04/2002; 30(4):746-52. DOI: 10.1097/00003246-200204000-00004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Subjects were more likely to remember experiences that were moderately to extremely bothersome. This might be because the more bothersome experiences were easier to recall or because most of these experiences are common and significant stressors to many of these patients. In either case, these data indicate that these patients are subject to numerous stressful experiences, which many find quite bothersome. This suggests the potential for improved symptom management, which could contribute to a less stressful intensive care unit stay and improved patient outcomes.

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    • "Further, Patak, et al., (2005) conducted a study and found that 62% of patients reported a high level of frustration in communicating their needs while being mechanically ventilated. Rotondi et al. (2002) and Tosun et al. (2009) reported the inability to communicate and the difficulty to be understood had been described as uncomfortable stressful experiences of ventilated patients. "

    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · OUSL Journal
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    • "Anxiety and dyspnoea are reported as major problems for most patients requiring a ventilator (Chlan 2009, Johnson & Sexton 1990, Kress 2006, Rotondi et al. 2002, Tsay et al. 2005). Furthermore, high levels of perceived dyspnoea with anxiety are often reported as major factors interfering with weaning trials, and lead patients to long-term respirator dependency (Korhan et al. 2011, Rotondi et al. 2002). Anxiety and dyspnoea cause increased sympathetic nervous system activation, lead to arterial and venous constriction, myocardial stimulation, bronchoconstriction, increased airway resistance, increased laboured breathing, and increased oxygen demand, thus increasing weaning patients from mechanical systems (Johnson & Sexton 1990). "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This research is an experimental study (randomized controlled) which is carried out to investigate the effect on anxiety of hand massage and acupressure therapy in patients having mechanical ventilation support.Method and material: This randomized controlled research was conducted in Intensive care units of Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Chest Diseases and Dr. Suat Seren Chest Diseases and Chest Surgery Training and Research Hospital between the dates 18 June 2007 and 3 May 2008. The research sample was comprised of a total of 70 patients who met the research criteria in the hand massage and acupressure (n=35) and control (n =35) groups. Data were collected by using Patient Information Form, Patient Record Form and Visual Analogue Scale. It was following patients in experimental and control groups during seven days. It was recorded physiological indicators of anxiety, perceived anxiety and dyspnoea of patients in control group. These patients weren’t used hand massage and acupressure therapy. The patients in experimental group weren’t used hand massage and acupressure therapy in the first and seventh days. It was recorded physiological indicators of anxiety, perceived anxiety and dyspnoea. The other days, it was used hand massage and acupressure therapy. It was recorded physiological indicators of anxiety, perceived anxiety and dyspnoea This research is an experimental study (randomized controlled) which is carried out to investigate the effect on anxiety of hand massage and acupressure therapy in patients having mechanical ventilation support. Research was conducted in Intensive care units of Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Chest Diseases and Dr. Suat Seren Chest Diseases and Chest Surgery Training and Research Hospital between the dates 18 June 2007 and 3 May 2008. The research sample was comprised of a total of 70 patients who met the research criteria in the hand massage and acupressure (n=35) and control (n =35) groups. Data were collected by using Patient Information Form, Patient Record Form and Visual Analogue Scale. It was following patients in experimental and control groups during seven days. It was recorded physiological indicators of anxiety, perceived anxiety and dyspnoea of patients in control group. These patients weren’t used hand massage and acupressure therapy. The patients in experimental group weren’t used hand massage and acupressure therapy in the first and seventh days. It was recorded physiological indicators of anxiety, perceived anxiety and dyspnoea. The other days, it was used hand massage and acupressure therapy. Hand massage and acupressure therapy was limited to 18 minutes. It was recorded physiological indicators of anxiety, perceived anxiety and dyspnoea before and after hand massage and acupressure therapy. It was calculated intensive care unit costs and determined duration in intensive care unit after discharge of patients in experimental and control groups. In the data analysis were used chi square, repeated measures analysis of variance, independent samples t test, paired samples t test, LSD (Least-Significant difference) tests.Results: According to the research findings, it wasn’t found significant as clinical which is the statistically significant difference in the physiological indicators of anxiety, perceived anxiety and dyspnoea except from oxygen saturation.Conclusion: In conclusion, our results suggest that hand massage and acupressure therapy might effectively relieve perceived dyspnoea and anxiety and reduce physiological indicators of anxiety in patients having mechanical ventilation support. The study provides a research-based intervention model for clinicians caring for MVP.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
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    • "Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a common, lifesaving and frequently employed treatment modality for a variety of medical diagnoses in intensive care units (ICU) (Besel, 2006). While this intervention itself is a life saving treatment, patients who are mechanically ventilated often face a variety of distressing situations including anxiety and agitation due to emotional distress, fear of pain or dying, fear raised from family members' previous experiences of those who have died in similar situations, discomfort, thirst, immobility, dyspnoea, confusion, and inability to relax (Dijkstra et al., 2010), pain, lack of sleep, tenseness, lack of control and loneliness, which are typically common stress and anxious reactions even when patients are sedated (Yagan et al., 2000; Rotondi et al., 2002; Thomas, 2003). Patients undergoing MV require endotracheal intubation and often have either intermittent or sustained periods of agitation because of the endotracheal tube itself. "
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    DESCRIPTION: This study provides evidence for the use of naturesound as an anxiolytic intervention
    Full-text · Research · Sep 2015
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