Article

Accuracy of radial arterial pressure measurement during surgery under controlled hypotension

Beirut University, Beyrouth, Beyrouth, Lebanon
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (Impact Factor: 2.32). 02/2002; 46(2):173-5. DOI: 10.1034/j.1399-6576.2002.460208.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Radial arterial pressure underestimates the pressure in the aorta in several clinical situations. A central-to-radial pressure gradient was attributed to intense vasodilation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of radial pressure monitoring during controlled hypotension achieved with profound arterial vasodilation.
Ten patients with ASA physical status I and II undergoing maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this prospective study. Radial and femoral arteries were cannulated and connected to a pressure monitoring system. Controlled hypotension was achieved with an infusion of nicardipine titrated to maintain MAP between 50 and 60 mmHg. Simultaneous radial and femoral systolic, mean and diastolic arterial pressures were recorded before, during and after controlled hypotension. Results were expressed as mean +/- SD. Concomitant radial and femoral pressures were compared by a paired Student's test, P < 0.05 being significant.
In all, 150 sets of arterial pressures measurement were obtained. There were no statistically significant differences between radial and femoral arterial pressures measured before, during or after controlled hypotension.
Radial arterial pressure is an accurate measure of central arterial pressure during controlled hypotension achieved with arterial vasodilation.

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    • "Increased SVRI and PVRI contributed to significant pressure gradient. It was consistent with those studies in which vasodilating therapy was beneficial to artery pressure gradient [10,11]. Normally, SVRI is seldom determined by arteries located between aorta to radial arteries. "
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the risk factors involved in radial-femoral artery pressure gradient after cardiac surgery. In this retrospective study, we reviewed 412 cardiac surgeries with both femoral artery pressure and radial artery pressure monitoring before cardiopulmonary bypass. 138 patients had radial-femoral artery pressure gradient after cardiopulmonary bypass (group P) but 263 were not (group N). Their hemodynamic data and other demographic data were analyzed. Phenylephrine usage was 1.7±1.1 mg in group N and 2.9±1.2 mg in group P (P<0.001). Total adrenaline usage was 229.2±116.9 µg in group N and 400.6±145.1 µg in group P (P<0.001). SBP gradient was -4±3, 14±9, 10±4, 0±11 mmHg in group P and -3±3, 0±1, -1±9, -6±4 mmHg in group N after induction, during discontinuation of CPB, at the end of surgery and 1 postoperative day respectively. DBP gradient was 3±3, -1±9, 4±5, 0±8 mmHg in group P and 3±3, 5±2, 7±5, 0±8 mmHg in group N after induction, during discontinuation of CPB, at the end of surgery and 1 postoperative day respectively. MAP gradient was 1±2, 4±6, 6±4, 0±8 mmHg in group P and 1±2, 3±1, 1±4, -2±5 mmHg in group N after induction, during discontinuation of CPB, at the end of surgery and 1 postoperative day respectively. Significant arterial pressure gradient emerged during discontinuation of CPB and at the end of surgery, which was more obvious in group P(P<0.01). CI was 2.0±0.3, 2.3±0.4,2.3±0.4, 2.2±0.4 L/min/m(2) in group P and 2.1±0.3, 2.8±0.5,2.8±0.5, 2.8±0.5 L/min/m(2) in group N at baseline, after discontinuation of CPB, at the end of surgery and the first postoperative day (P<0.001). Detecting the exact central artery pressure is most important when patients have artery pressure gradients after cardiac surgery. Use inotropic agents to improve cardiac output, avoiding excessive vasoconstriction might reduce artery pressure gradient.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    • "Yazigi and colleagues [20] studied normal volunteers to determine whether radial arterial pressure accurately reflects changes in blood pressure induced by nicardipine. They concluded that peripheral arterial pressure is an accurate measure of central arterial pressure in this setting, and they found no distal pulse amplification. "
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    ABSTRACT: Invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring is a common practice in intensive care units (ICUs). Accuracy of invasive blood pressure monitoring is crucial in evaluating the cardiocirculatory system and adjusting drug therapy for hemodynamic support. However, the best site for catheter insertion is controversial. Lack of definitive information in critically ill patients makes it difficult to establish guidelines for daily practice in intensive care. We hypothesize that peripheral and central mean arterial blood pressures are interchangeable in critically ill patients. This is a prospective, observational study carried out in a surgical-medical ICU in a teaching hospital. Fifty-five critically ill patients with clinical indication of invasive arterial pressure monitoring were included in the study. No interventions were made. Simultaneous measurements were registered in central (femoral) and peripheral (radial) arteries. Bias and precision between both measurements were calculated with Bland-Altman analysis for the whole group. Bias and precision were compared between patients receiving high doses of vasoactive drugs (norepinephrine or epinephrine >0.1 microg/kg/minute or dopamine >10 microg/kg/minute) and those receiving low doses (norepinephrine or epinephrine <0.1 microg/kg/minute or dopamine <10 microg/kg/minute). Central mean arterial pressure was 3 +/- 4 mmHg higher than peripheral mean arterial pressure for the whole population and there were no differences between groups (3 +/- 4 mmHg for both groups). Measurement of mean arterial blood pressure in radial or femoral arteries is clinically interchangeable. It is not mandatory to cannulate the femoral artery, even in critically ill patients receiving high doses of vasoactive drugs.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2006 · Critical care (London, England)
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract is available for this article.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2002 · Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
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