Boyd AS, Shyr Y, King LE JrBasal cell carcinoma in young women: an evaluation of the association of tanning bed use and smoking. J Am Acad Dermatol 46:706-709

ArticleinJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology 46(5):706-9 · June 2002with20 Reads
Impact Factor: 4.45 · DOI: 10.1067/mjd.2002.120467 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) typically occur in middle-aged to elderly patients but less commonly in younger ones. In our experience, most BCCs seen in patients younger than 40 years are found in women. We evaluated 30 women with biopsy-proven BCC and 30 control patients matched for sex, age, and skin type to determine potential risk factors for this population. Tanning bed visits, pack-years of cigarette smoking, recreational sun exposure, number of blistering sunburns, and use of sunscreens were determined for both groups. Among patients with a BCC, the histologic type of tumor, site of involvement, method of treatment, follow-up period, incidence of recurrence, and presence of actinic keratoses were also evaluated. Patients with a BCC had a statistically greater number of pack years of smoking (P =.045), and a greater percentage of these women had experienced blistering sunburns (P =.028). Although women with a BCC had, on average, almost twice as many tanning salon visits (152.2 vs 83.1), this was not statistically significant. Sunscreen use and amount of recreational ultraviolet light exposure were essentially equal between the two groups. Young women with a BCC are more likely to have a past or current history of cigarette smoking and blistering sunburns. Repeated exposure to tanning beds may also be a contributory factor.