Article

The use of a meditation programme for institutionalized juvenile delinquents

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Abstract

The study applied intensive-seven consecutive days meditation programme in 101 late adolescent male delinquents in Upekkha Detention Centre. All of the boys completed the programme and answered the questionnaires. All of them felt that the meditation practice had been beneficial. 70 per cent of the subjects described feelings of contentment and calm, 53 per cent requested the programme to be repeated, 52 per cent of the subjects declared a clearer undestanding in the doctrine of Karma, 44 per cent referred to improved concentration and awareness, 36 per cent felt less impulsive, 22 per cent had flashbacks of their criminal behavior and their victims. In conclusion, the boys in Upekkha Detention Centre had the willing to join and complete the intensive meditation programme. Their self assessment reports showed a positive attitude to the programme. It is possible to develop a meditation programme as an adjunctive therapy for institutionalized juvenile delinquents.

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... In one study of middle school-aged children, student feedback on a five-week programme combining Tai Chi and MBSR included the experience of well-being, calmness, relaxation, improved sleep, less reactivity, increased self-care, enhanced selfawareness and a sense of interconnection or interdependence with nature (Wall, 2005). An intensive meditation programme of seven consecutive days for 101 late-adolescent male delinquents in a Thai detention centre found that 70% reported feelings of contentment and calm, 44% referred to improved concentration and awareness, and 36% felt less impulsive (Witoonchart & Bartlet, 2002). A descriptive, qualitative study using semi-structured interviews on 10 seventh grade students who practiced transcendental meditation for one year reported increased restful alertness and improvement in self-control, self-reflection/awareness and flexibility in emotional response, as well as improved academic performance (Rosaen & Benn, 2006). ...
... The qualitative findings from this study show positive effects of student meditation in school, as reported by parents, students and teachers. The increase in calmness and relaxation and emotional/behavioural control following meditation is consistent with other studies (Wall, 2005;Witoonchart & Bartlet, 2002;Rosaen & Benn, 2006;Napoli, 2004). Such effects are important in the context of a recent Australian nationwide study of more than 10,000 students (Bernard et al, 2007) in which 40% of students reported worrying too much, 30% were stressed and 40% had difficulty in calming down. ...
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