Article

Computer-Related Anxiety: Examining the Impact of Technology-Specific Affect on the Performance of a Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment Measure

Department of Psychiatry Human Behavior, Miriam Hospital, Brown Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island 02903, USA.
Applied Neuropsychology (Impact Factor: 1.97). 02/2002; 9(4):210-8. DOI: 10.1207/S15324826AN0904_3
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to examine the effect of impairment status and computer-specific anxiety on the performance of a computerized neuropsychological assessment measure. Computer related anxiety was measured using a standardized self-report measure tapping anxiety specific to computers and technology. Outcome on this measure was compared with error scores and response timing variables on a computerized version of the Category Test (CT) in both normal individuals and individuals with neurological, psychiatric, or substance abuse histories. Multivariate analysis results, controlling for psychomotor performance, revealed significant main effects for group status and computer-related anxiety. CT performance was significantly related to the level of computer-related anxiety, in that high anxiety resulted in higher CT error scores and longer response times, and the negative impact of computer-related anxiety on computerized neuropsychological assessment performance was stronger in individuals with impairment histories. Our results suggest that as computer-related anxiety increases, performance on computer administered neuropsychological assessment measures tends to decrease. Key words: computers, anxiety, computer-based task performance, clinical neuropsychology, Category Test

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