Repeat HIV Testing Among Hispanic Men Who Have Sex With Men—A Sign Of Risk, Prevention, or Reassurance?

ArticleinAIDS Education and Prevention 15(1 Suppl A):105-16 · February 2003with15 Reads
Impact Factor: 1.59 · DOI: 10.1521/aeap.15.1.5.105.23608 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    This study examined factors associated with repeat (n > or = 3 lifetime) and regular (n > or = 2 times per year, for a minimum of 1 year) HIV testing among a community sample of 538 seronegative Hispanic men who have sex with men (MSM). Bilingual staff interviewed respondents anonymously at public venues in South Florida. We compared (a) repeat testers with nonrepeat testers and (b) regular testers with nonregular testers. Results of logistic regression analyses indicated that repeat testers were more likely to be older, more educated, have a history of sexually transmitted disease, and have more sex partners than nonrepeat testers. Regular testers were more likely to be younger, have lower HIV risk perceptions, and have intentionally taken their first HIV test than were nonregular testers. They were also more likely to engage in oral sex and to only engage in 100% protected insertive anal sex. These findings suggest the importance of studying both the frequency and regularity of HIV testing behaviors, and using them to design interventions to promote testing among Hispanic MSM who are most at risk.