Article

National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Key clinical activities for quality asthma care. Recommendations of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program

Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
MMWR. Recommendations and reports: Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control 04/2003; 52(RR-6):1-8.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

In 1997, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP), coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, published the second Expert Panel Report (EPR-2): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Expert Panel Report 2: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 1997; publication no. 97-4051. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/ asthma/asthgdln.pdf). Subsequently, the NAEPP Expert Panel identified key questions regarding asthma management that were submitted to an evidence practice center of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to conduct a systematic review of the evidence. The resulting evidence report was used by the Expert Panel to update recommendations for clinical practice on selected topics. These recommendations (EPR-Update 2002) were published in 2002. (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma--update on selected topics 2002. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2002;110[November 2002, part 2]. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/asthma/index.htm). To improve the implementation of these guidelines, a working group of the Professional Education Subcommittee of the NAEPP extracted key clinical activities that should be considered as essential for quality asthma care in accordance with the EPR-2 guidelines and the EPR-Update 2002. The purpose was to develop a report that would help purchasers and planners of health care define the activities that are important to quality asthma care, particularly in reducing symptoms and preventing exacerbations, and subsequently reducing the overall national burden of illness and death from asthma. This report is intended to help employer health benefits managers and other health-care planners make decisions regarding delivery of health care for persons with asthma. Although this report is based on information directed to clinicians; it is not intended to substitute for recommended clinical practices for caring for persons with asthma, nor is it intended to replace the clinical decision-making required to meet individual patient needs. Readers are referred to the EPR-2 for the full asthma guidelines regarding diagnosis and management of asthma or to the abstracted Practical Guide (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Practical guide for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Bethesda MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 1997; publication no. 97-4053. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/practgde.htm) and to the EPR-Update 2002. The 1997 EPR-2 guidelines and EPR-Update 2002 were derived from a consensus of leading asthma researchers from academic, clinical, federal and voluntary institutions and based on scientific evidence supported by the literature. The 10 key activities highlighted here correspond to the four recommended-as-essential components of asthma management: assessment and monitoring, control of factors contributing to asthma severity, pharmacotherapy and education for a partnership in care. The key clinical activities are not intended for acute or hospital management of patients with asthma but rather for the preventive aspects of managing asthma long term. This report was developed as a collaborative activity between CDC and the NAEPP.

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    • "Asthma is a chronic lower airways inflammatory disorder that results from genetic factors and environmental exposure to allergens and irritants characterized by episodic and reversible airways obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness.[1] With effective treatment and avoiding allergens and irritants, the majority of patients have a controlled disease.[2] The treatment protocol for asthma is designed to control symptoms and airways inflammation; airways hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling were usually forgotten.[34] "
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    ABSTRACT: Routine protocol of asthma treatment has been focused on symptom suppression but severity of inflammation and spirometry findings may be neglected. We investigated the efficacy of full dose treatment protocol on patients with mild asthma symptoms with normal spirometry. A before-after clinical trial study was conducted on patients with asthma symptoms (dyspnea, cough, and wheezing), while they had a near to normal pulmonary function test. Full dose treatment protocol (prednisolone 1 mg/kg for 5 days then fluticasone spray 250 mg four puffs daily plus salmeterol spray 25 mg four puffs daily), which was routinely used for severe asthma, was administrated and patients were followed up for 2 months. Sixty-eight patients (mean age (±SD) = 43.77 ± 10.70 years, female/male ratio; 47/53%) finally finished the study. At the baseline, mean forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were 91 ± 12% and 87 ± 11% of the predicted value, respectively. Two months after treatment, the mean FEV1 and FVC were 105 ± 14% and 97 ± 10%, respectively, which both improved compared with the baseline, significantly (P < 0.001). Frequencies of cough and dyspnea were significantly decreased (P = 0.041 and 0.034, respectively). Our result declared that full dose treatment can improve spirometry amounts and frequency of symptoms in patients with near to normal spirometry and obvious asthmatic symptoms. Routine treatment protocol of mild asthma recommends sole short-acting b2 receptor agonist, but it seems that pulmonary function and volume can be increased with more aggressive treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Journal of research in medical sciences
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    • "Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are widely accepted as the first line of treatment for the suppression of airway inflammation of asthma [1,2]. Although it is well known that ICS cause dose-related adrenocortical suppression, it is less known that they can lead to iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (CS) [3-5]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Current guidelines recommend the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for suppression of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Although it is well known that ICS cause dose-related adrenocortical suppression, it is less known that they can lead to iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (CS). Fluticasone propionate (FP) is an ICS more potent than beclomethasone and budesonide. FP is metabolized as mediated by cytochrome P450 3A4 in the liver and the gut. Systemic bioactivity of FP can increase with the use of drugs that affect the cytochrome P450. Herein, we report the rapid development of iatrogenic CS in a patient receiving paroxetine and mirtazepine for 12 weeks in addition to inhaled FP.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012
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    • "Spirometry was performed on patients who received no drugs at least 24 hours before attendance. In all patients, the treatment was adjusted according to the level of severity (15). All patients were treated with an inhalation of Short-acting beta2-agonists for symptom control, along with high dose Fluticasone / salmeterol (250 µg-50 µg) 2 inhalations twice daily, and a short course of oral prednisone (40 -60 mg daily). "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Due to current controversies regarding the effect of age on response to treatment in asthmatic patient, the present study was performed on patients referred with acute asthma attack for further evaluation of this matter. Materials and Methods In this study 138 patients with severe persistent asthma were enrolled and divided into two categories of young (age ≤35 yrs; 82 cases, mean age = 25.2±7.3 years) and elderly subjects (≥50 yrs; 56 cases, mean age 57.4±6.4 years). Response to treatment was determined by pulmonary function tests. Results The mean percentage change of FEV1 from baseline in male and female patients of young and old age was 75.05±46.61 and 71.39±41.30%, (P = 0.721) and 100.79±51.34% and 69±37.39% (P = 0.015), respectively. The mean percentage of possible improvement of FEV1 among male and female patients of young and old age was 62.81±25.67% and 54.46±23.82% (P = 0.148), and 78±24.04% and 63.58±41.24% (P = 0.087); respectively. Conclusion Response to treatment was significant in both young and old age groups suffering from acute asthmatic attack except for young female patients in which, percentage change of FEV1 increased compared to older patients. Among other patients this value and percentage of possible improvement of FEV1 between the 2 groups did not change significantly and age did not play a significant role in assessing the response to treatment in acute asthmatic attack.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Tanaffos
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