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Abstract

EOPs are an important component of public health emergency preparedness. EOPs are developed according to an "all-hazard approach". These EOPs include a basic plan, functional annexes, hazard-specific appendices and SOPs.
... Irrespective of the space dimensions, it would be useful to consider the basic PHEOC layout approaches including the Boardroom, Mission Control, Marketplace, Bull's-Eye or Virtual models. The underlying philosophy of any lay out should be ease of function of an PHEOC-ease of communication (technological and in person), easy assembly or convening of multidisciplinary teams, ease of sharing coordination information, and concentrate command structure activities in a visibly manageable location [8,14,[29][30][31]For example, if watch functions, logistics, and field operations are accommodated in independent buildings or floors or separated by divisions, coordination can take longer time than if it was in the same space. The layout of the PHEOC room may take the form of a boardroom, mission control, marketplace or Bull's eye design. ...
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