Article

Acute care nurse practitioner education: enhancing performance through the use of clinical simulation

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, School of Nursing, 14214, USA.
AACN Clinical Issues Advanced Practice in Acute and Critical Care 09/2003; 14(3):331-41.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Full-body patient simulators have been used for a number of years to educate nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologists. These lifelike mannequins operate from a sophisticated computerized system with the ability to generate multiple physiologic events and respond to numerous pharmacologic stimuli. The authors recently integrated the use of the patient simulator into the curriculum to educate their acute care nurse practitioner students. The learning process was divided into three steps: the presimulation experience, the simulation experience, and the postsimulation experience. These steps are described as well as important principles that need to be integrated into each phase of the process. A case scenario on respiratory failure provides an example of the simulation experience. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of this teaching method, as identified by faculty and students, are discussed.

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    • "Critical thinking and problemsolving skills are encouraged and developed using realistic simulated learning environments [22]. Simulation-based training improves recall in authentic clinical situations [23], as well as familiarization with medications, instruments, and medical equipment during simulations, which enhances trainee performance [24]. Simulation promotes teamwork skills [25] and improves communication skills [26] "
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    ABSTRACT: Human lives depend on the performance of our trainees; thus, the educational methodology used to transform our learners into experts are of paramount importance. Effective use of simulation requires educators explore and apply educational theory as they discover who the learner is, how the learner learns, what the learning needs are, and which planned learning experiences are best suited to meet the learner's specialized needs. The purpose of this article is to portray simulation as an educational strategy in the context of a curriculum, to explore emerging theories from educational psychology, and to provide concrete examples of their application in simulation-based education.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2009 · Journal of critical care
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    ABSTRACT: The confidence to perform a skill (self-efficacy) is affected by multiple factors (ability, personality, self-estimate of ability, locus of control, and motivation). Sixty beginning nursing students (freshman and early sophomores) were studied as to their self-efficacy and locus of control in the acquisition of basic nursing skills in two simulated educational methods. Students were randomly assigned to the human-patient simulator (HPS) a computerized life-size mannequin, or to the standardized patient (SP) an actor trained to simulate a patient. Educational simulations share essential attributes: 1) they imitate but do not duplicate reality, 2) they offer chances to ‘make an error’ and 3) they provide feedback. These characteristics make simulations important in nursing practice thus allowing the student to learn from their mistakes without causing any harm and provide objective feedback (McGuire, 1999). Data was collected using pre and post self efficacy and locus of control questionnaires from students who received 80% or greater on performance of nursing skills such as: measuring blood pressure and pulse. Analysis of the data suggests a significant (p<0.001) increase in self-efficacy from pre to post score and a non-significant change towards an internal locus of control. Implications for healthcare and for nursing programs are discussed.
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