Article

Protein components of the isolated myofibrils

Biochemical Journal (Impact Factor: 4.4). 09/1953; 55(1):114-22. DOI: 10.1042/bj0550114
Source: PubMed
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    Preview · Article · Aug 1954 · Biochemical Journal
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    Preview · Article · Aug 1954 · Biochemical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The chapter discusses the fish proteins. Fishes are the only vertebrates able to split thiamine. Thiaminase occurs in the muscles and viscera of many fishes and in some invertebrates. The occurrence of at least two thiaminases differing in pH optimum and in activity in presence of heavy metals has been established by comparing fresh-water, brackish-water, and salt-water fishes. The other enzymatic reactions found in fish seem to be common to all vertebrates. Study of these reactions has been mainly directed toward the biochemical changes occurring post-mortem in fish muscle, the so-called “internal” factors of fish spoilage, which have involved investigations in glycolysis, lipolysis, and proteolysis. It has been stated that osmotic pressure measurements of animal plasmas have shown that an incontestable correlation exists between the protein concentration of the plasma and the position occupied by the animal in the scale of zoological classification. This rule, at least to some extent, may also be applicable to certain classes of vertebrates. Numerous determinations on lower vertebrates indicate that fish plasmas are usually poorer in protein than those of higher vertebrates. The comparative electrophoretic study of plasmas, which was at first confined to mammals and birds, was later extended to fish. Few proteins have attracted as much interest as fish protamines. This is due to several factors: (1) their low molecular weight and simple chemical composition, (2) their importance in the study of heredity, (3) their use as precipitants in preparative protein chemistry, and (4) their pharmacological action. These proteins are prepared from the cell nuclei of spermatozoa, which are easily isolated from the milt.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1955 · Advances in protein chemistry
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