Project

come_IN Computerclubs

Goal: Das Projekt come_IN untersucht das gemeinsame Lernen verschiedener Kulturen und Generationen. Als eine besonders aktive und bewusste Form von Integration kann dieses Lernen durch die Nutzung moderner Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie unterstützt werden. Im Rahmen des Projektes werden die Erfahrungen eines interkulturellen Computerclubs an einer Grundschule untersucht und auf ihre Übertragbarkeit überprüft. Darüberhinaus wird untersucht, welche Themen besonders geeignet für das gemeinsame Lernen von Kindern und Eltern unterschiedlicher Herkunft sind. Ein Beispiel stellt die Beschäftigung mit der eigenen gemeinsamen, aber auch unterschiedlichen Geschichte der Menschen dar. Moderne Technologien wie tragbare Geräte ("mobile devices") können zu einer Neuentdeckung des eigenen Lebensraumes eingesetzt werden. So kann nicht nur ein neuer Typus von Museum gestaltet werden, sondern sich auch ein neues Verständnis eigener Geschichte entwickeln und eine neue Identität entstehen.

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Project log

Konstantin Aal
added a research item
This case study describes the establishment of an educational ICT-intervention, a Computer Club, in the High Atlas, Morocco. We will first give an overview of the general approach and the first intervention. Then, we go into depth of the following trip, 15 months after the opening of the Computer Club. We describe the concerns to address and activities planned in advance based on the knowledge we acquired during the first intervention as well as on the insights we gained during this trip and discuss how much has changed. Reflections of these experiences discuss the importance of involving local partners, mitigating the power dynamics to build a trustful relationship and the impact of the intervention on the valley. We conclude with the most recent developments which involved a visit of the local partners to Germany to create a common understanding of the club approach. CCS CONCEPTS • Human-centered computing~Empirical studies in HCI • Human-centered computing~Empirical studies in collaborative and social computing
Konstantin Aal
added a research item
Zusammenfassung | Der wissenschaftliche Diskurs um die Relevanz gleichberechtigten Zugangs zu moderner Kommunikationstechnologie für gute soziale und wirtschaftliche Entwicklungschancen hat mit der ‚digitalen Kluft‘ ein eindrückliches Bild, das infolge unterschiedlich ausgeprägter Nutzung von Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien (IKT) entstehende Wissensklüfte verdeutlicht. Mit der rasanten (Weiter-)Entwicklung moderner Technologien und der Verbreitung sozialer Medien sind die konkreten Ausprägungen dieser Klüfte in der interkulturellen Stadtgesellschaft in stetem Wandel begriffen. Die qualitative Studie untersucht die positiven sowie negativen Ausprägungen des ‚Digital Divide‘ unter älteren Migrantinnen am Beispiel einer mittleren Großstadt in Deutschland und diskutiert soziale Strukturen, die auf lokaler, nachbarschaftlicher Ebene als ausgleichende Faktoren wirken können. Schlüsselworte | Migrantinnen, Alter, IKT, Digital Divide, Digitale Spaltung, Deutschland
Jennifer Booker
added a research item
While unquestionably research on CSE education is centered in the SIGCSE conference, other venues such as the International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (Ubicomp), and the Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI), and the Conference on Interaction Design and Children (ICD) explore CS education focusing on educational play and novel off the desktop techniques for CS education. Unfortunately, this literature remains isolated from the mainstream CSE literature, and this lightning talk attempts to help contribute to rectifying this by presenting a core recent educational theory "Computational Making" and discuss its contributions to CSE.
Konstantin Aal
added a research item
This study explores the combination of tangible artifacts and digital storytelling as an enabling means for women from educationally disadvantaged communities to have their voices heard in (local) public discourse, and at the same time gain in eloquence with regard to speech and technology and media use. Results show how representative, yet personally meaningful tangible artifacts helped participants to voice experiences, develop computer skills and position themselves with regard to similarities and differences of their migration backgrounds and the host society.
Thomas von Rekowski
added 3 research items
Underprivileged communities, though might have access to computers and the Internet, are facing the second digital divide. One reason for this seems to be the missing insight of why there is an actual need in user created content and its presentation in virtual collaborative places online. Splatch is an offline framework, supporting users in generating and orchestrating their own content before the background of commonly shared places they feel familiar with. By doing so, we hope to help users in experiencing the actual need of gaining social capital in an online environment by promoting user created content.
Former immigrant workers from Turkey have settled down in Germany. They have established communities within German cities. However, they are confronted with unequal opportunities. Differences in access and appropriation of computer technology may amplify the gap between the German Turkish minority and the mainstream society. We have tackled this problem by creating an intercultural computer club. This paper presents results from this action research project in which we engaged children of an elementary school and their parents. We conclude that the application of ICT in the club has to be analyzed carefully with regard to the differing needs of its members. When applying ICT in order to produce artifacts in cross-cultural project teams, specific roles emerge, which are mainly defined by sub-group affiliation. Since Turkish women face serious challenges in finding their socio- cultural identity, we have extended the club's concept by adding a women's group.
The spread of the Internet has led to a change from a TV-childhood to a computer-childhood. We investigate how this shift towards networked forms of communication is reflected in constructionist learning environments and elaborate the concept of objects-to-think-with-together in the context of using computers as tool and social medium at the same time. In doing so, we propose four design aspects that should be considered in the context of socially-oriented constructionist learning environments: providing an integrated platform for construction and socializing, supporting re-mixing and re-using as well as self-expression and appreciation, allowing collaborative projects of non-collocated learners, and supporting enculturation and team-building.
Konstantin Aal
added a research item
In this paper we explore the appropriateness of e-textiles for teaching programming to mixed gender groups ages 8-12, allowing children to construct maker identities around technology. Our findings demonstrate the potential of e-textiles to promote girls' and boys' computational literacy, and the required craft and programming skills for making that can disrupt binary gender roles. We argue it allows both girls and boys to demonstrate technical mastery as well as to explore and construct a spectrum of gendered sociotechnical identities that might otherwise be obscured by conventional masculinist attitudes towards technology.
Konstantin Aal
added 3 research items
This demo focuses supplements our paper "From Computational Thinking to Computation Making" to allow visitors to interact with the various technologies the children in our club created, including an interactive monster. Additionally, to make the demo interactive and to encourage conference attendees to discuss their experience of "making" we will have a Monster Making contest.
From the arts and craft movement (Dormer 1997) to today's DIY (Tanenbaum et al. 2013); from theoretical thinking about the significance of craft in relation to the making of art (Whittick 1984) and everyday design artifacts (Bean & Rosner 2012); crafting as innovation (Yair et al 2001), and crafting as remodeling and repairing (Tinari 2010): crafting and the creation of things has been in the focus of researchers for many years, spanning multiple disciplines. This includes the CHI and CSCW community, where the relation of computing and craft has moved to the fore in recent years (e.g. Buechley et al. 2009; Mellis et al. 2013). Two lines of discourse have evolved. The first is concerned with craft and its significance for the development of the individual (e.g. Bardzell et al 2012, Treadaway 2009). Here, special attention is paid to the creative moment involved (Do & Gross 2007). The second line of research approaches the concept of craft from a decidedly interdisciplinary point of view, seeking to fundamentally explore and understand its influence on design in HCI (e.g. Wright et al 2006). Whereas other works focus particularly on crafting as a type of activity or on its influence for informing design practice, we seek to explore the potential of craft for community-building processes. Our study is based on a network of computer clubs in socially and culturally diverse neighborhoods in Germany. Providing open and yet guided access to modern information- and computer technology in an after school setting for both children and adults, these clubs seek to contribute to the bridging of the so-called 'digital divide' - the disproportionate access of immigrant communities as compared to mainstream society to computer infrastructure (e.g. Norris 2001; Wagner et al 2002; Whitte & Mannon 2010). In bridging this divide, the computer clubs aim to foster cross-cultural understanding and respect in the diverse local neighborhood settings (Schubert et al 2011; Stevens et al 2005). In our comparative study of three craft-based interventions, we seek to understand how craft can be employed as a means to trigger and foster the cross-cultural and technological identity exploration which fosters community-building in socially and culturally diverse societal contexts.
Computational thinking is considered best practice for teaching computing and more broadly to solve problems and design systems, however as computing extends beyond the desktop (for instance increased integration of ubicomp technologies) so too must our educational methods. Exposure to ubicomp technologies is most accessible through the maker movement. With this in mind we argue we must move from computational thinking to computational making as an educational framework. Here we present a case study of children's making to support our vision for a broader conception of computational making.
Konstantin Aal
added 3 research items
We work with a multinational network of computer clubs for families and children called come IN. In two such clubs (located in Palestinian refugee camps in the West Bank), we worked with children on playful approaches concerning 3D modeling and 3D printing within a five-week, qualitative field study. Based on this study, we report on the achievements as well as on the difficulties of digital fabrication and of " Making " in developmental and educational contexts. The benefits are related to an overarching theme of self-expression where the main focus was on dimensions as playfulness, approachable complexity, individualization, immediacy and physicality and collaboration as well as motivation. The problematic aspects were mostly related to socio-technical limitations concerning the themes of orientation and camera control, the lack of coordination and collaboration features, usability and UX issues as well as the construction and limitations of current 3D printers. Based on those findings, we have derived implications for the design and the appropriation of future systems for digital fabrication with children, especially in developmental / educational settings, such as improvements of their collaboration support or better feedback mechanisms regarding the system status towards the end user.
The study explores paper from an ethnographic perspective. It focuses on paper as a material that facilitates the production and retention of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering Arts, and Maths) knowledge in children. In an after-school activity with elementary and secondary school children in Germany, a paper project was conducted that revealed how the crafting of paper circuits promotes both creative craft skills, as well as technical ability. Identifying key structural elements of the projects, we argue that the process of using, creating and questioning through, with and for the technology inherent to the paper project activities permitted the children to gain both access to STEAM knowledge and thereby build creative agency and technical self-efficacy.
This poster describes the research around computer clubs in Palestinian refugee camps and the various lessons learned during the establishment of this intervention such the importance of the physical infrastructure (e.g. clean room, working hardware), soft technologies (e.g. knowledge transfer through workshops), social infrastructure (e.g. reliable partners in the refugee camp, partner from the university) and social capital (e.g. shared vision and values of all stakeholders). These important insights can be transferred on other interventions in similar unstable environments.
Oliver Stickel
added 6 research items
We work with a multinational network of computer clubs for families and children called come IN. In two such clubs (located in Palestinian refugee camps in the West Bank), we worked with children on playful approaches concerning 3D modeling and 3D printing within a five-week, qualitative field study. Based on this study, we report on the achievements as well as on the difficulties of digital fabrication and of " Making " in developmental and educational contexts. The benefits are related to an overarching theme of self-expression where the main focus was on dimensions as playfulness, approachable complexity, individualization, immediacy and physicality and collaboration as well as motivation. The problematic aspects were mostly related to socio-technical limitations concerning the themes of orientation and camera control, the lack of coordination and collaboration features, usability and UX issues as well as the construction and limitations of current 3D printers. Based on those findings, we have derived implications for the design and the appropriation of future systems for digital fabrication with children, especially in developmental / educational settings, such as improvements of their collaboration support or better feedback mechanisms regarding the system status towards the end user.
This thesis covers Making@Palestine, a project in which my colleague Dominik Hornung and myself introduced marginalized Palestinian children in two refugee camps in the West Bank to playful 3D modeling and 3D printing. The goal was to investigate into the potential of Making and digital fabrication in the framing of the research project come_IN which aims at socio-cultural empowerment in developmental settings through constructionist, informal learning processes and associated learning spaces (so called come_IN computer clubs). By way of a five-week empiric field study grounded in a situated, participatory and practice-based understanding of Human Computer Interaction and the development of Information and Communication Technology, we were able to uncover benefits and chances but also limiting factors of 3D printing and Making in developmental settings: The benefits related to an overarching theme of self-expression with the central dimensions playfulness, approachable complexity, individualization, immediacy and physicality} and collaboration as well as motivation responsible for the success. The problematic aspects mostly related to the limitations of current digital fabrication systems along the themes of orientation and camera control, lack of coordination and collaboration features, usability and UX issues as well as the construction and limits of current 3D printers. Based on those empirical findings, I derive implications for the design as well as for scaffolding the introduction and appropriation process of future systems for digital fabrication in ICT4D settings.
In this contribution, we detail Making@Palestine, a five-week qualitative field study in which we introduced Palestinian refugee children in the West Bank to playful 3D modelling and 3D printing. We analyse 3D printing on a technology as well as an artifact level and identify its potential for participation and empowerment in developmental contexts along such themes as self-expression or physicality & taking things home. There seems to be considerable potential in 3D printing and other digital fabrication technologies for the empowerment of marginalized population along such themes. However, we also found that the available, consumer-focused 3D printing technologies do not support appropriation as well as they should, preventing especially novice, untrained users from reaching their complete potential. We draw on our fieldwork to outline some of the breaking points in regards to appropriation.
Konstantin Aal
added a research item
The study explores the positive impact for girls and young women from engaging in computer clubs, with regard to their vocational preparation as well as to their social empowerment. Our comparative study focuses on gender related barriers in a Palestinian refugee camp as well as an intercultural neighborhood in Germany and discusses how the computer club can contribute to overcoming these. Findings indicate a positive impact of open and collaborative working and learning structures; in Palestine and Germany alike.
Konstantin Aal
added a project reference
Konstantin Aal
added a project goal
Das Projekt come_IN untersucht das gemeinsame Lernen verschiedener Kulturen und Generationen. Als eine besonders aktive und bewusste Form von Integration kann dieses Lernen durch die Nutzung moderner Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie unterstützt werden. Im Rahmen des Projektes werden die Erfahrungen eines interkulturellen Computerclubs an einer Grundschule untersucht und auf ihre Übertragbarkeit überprüft. Darüberhinaus wird untersucht, welche Themen besonders geeignet für das gemeinsame Lernen von Kindern und Eltern unterschiedlicher Herkunft sind. Ein Beispiel stellt die Beschäftigung mit der eigenen gemeinsamen, aber auch unterschiedlichen Geschichte der Menschen dar. Moderne Technologien wie tragbare Geräte ("mobile devices") können zu einer Neuentdeckung des eigenen Lebensraumes eingesetzt werden. So kann nicht nur ein neuer Typus von Museum gestaltet werden, sondern sich auch ein neues Verständnis eigener Geschichte entwickeln und eine neue Identität entstehen.