Project

Youth employment partnerSHIP - evaluation studies in Spain, Hungary, Italy and Poland

Goal: The project will evaluate two set of initiatives: outreach activities of Public Employment Services (PES) and job trials/job subsidies to different job contracts offered to youth, with a particular attention paid to gender dimension of policy targeting and outcomes.

Date: 1 October 2018 - 1 September 2021

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Project log

Marta Palczyńska
added an update
We are happy to invite you to our "Youth employment policy" Conference on the 8th of June 2022.
Dr Max Uebe, Head of Unit Future of Work, Youth Employment in DG Employment will give the opening speech.
 
Agota Scharle
added a research item
One of the prime objectives of the Youth Guarantee is to convince young persons not in education or employment to register as jobseekers. This is done such that they can benefit from the services that the YG provides, which is especially important for those with a vulnerable background. However, as we show in this report based on Labour Force Survey data, the Public Employment Services in Hungary have not been particularly successful in raising registration rates, and this is only partly due to having to work with young persons who are less motivated to search for a job. What is more, we show, based on matched administrative, as well as large-sample survey data, that there were large regional differences in registration rates of NEETs. This is especially salient when looking at registration rates at the level of local PES offices. While youth in more developed areas seem to need the services of the PES less, thanks to better labour market, there is considerable variation in the propensity to register as jobseeker across micro-regions. Relying on a survey of local PES offices, we also find that outreach efforts seem to be modest, and that commitment towards getting NEETs from a vulnerable background to register as jobseeker is mixed. In particular, building active links to a variety of local stakeholders working with youth is restricted, and a considerable portion of local PES do not think that it is their role to attract these youngsters. This is compounded by the lack of time and well-trained personnel in local PES offices.
Marta Palczyńska
added a research item
This paper compares the relative effectiveness of selected active labour market policies available to young unemployed people in Poland in the years 2015-2016. We use rich administrative data and propensity score matching techniques to control for the non-random selection of unemployed individuals into alternative interventions. We find large negative employment effects of participating in public works programmes, particularly among disadvantaged individuals. The differences in effectiveness between other interventions are rather small, and most become insignificant over time. We also show that vouchers that allow unemployed individuals find on-the-job training providers themselves are more effective than on-the-job training schemes in which the unemployed individuals are directed to the training providers by the public employment services (PES).
Mateusz Smoter
added an update
This paper compares the relative effectiveness of selected active labour market policies available to young unemployed people in Poland in the years 2015-2016. We use rich administrative data and propensity score matching techniques to control for the non-random selection of unemployed individuals into alternative interventions. We find large negative employment effects of participating in public works programmes, particularly among disadvantaged individuals. The differences in effectiveness between other interventions are rather small, and most become insignificant over time. We also show that vouchers that allow unemployed individuals find on-the-job training providers themselves are more effective than on-the-job training schemes in which the unemployed individuals are directed to the training providers by the public employment services (PES).
 
Agota Scharle
added a research item
In this paper, we perform a counterfactual evaluation of a publicly funded short-term hiring subsidy designed for young jobseekers in Hungary: namely, the 90-day job trial programme, which was introduced in 2015 a part of the Youth Guarantee scheme. The analysis is based on a linked administrative dataset of PES registers and social security records. We rely on propensity score matching for causal inference and compare job trial participants and participants in public works and classroom training programmes. Our estimates indicate that compared to participation in the public works programme, participation in the 90-day job trial improved employment prospects of young people: job trial participants spent 14-23 days more in employment within six months after the programme ended, the probability of being employed is higher by 4-7.7% six months after the programme on the whole sample. The difference is lower compared to the training participants: job trial participants spent 7.5-12 days more in employment status. The impact is weaker on the 12-month horizon compared to both control groups. It is the most employable young jobseekers who participate in the 90-day job trial subsidy: they have higher levels of education, live in more developed regions, spent less time in the NEET (not in employment, education, or training) status, and have more work experience than the pool of eligible jobseekers. These findings suggest that the programme did not reach disadvantaged and vulnerable groups, who needed help the most. We complement this analysis with a preliminary evaluation of the whole Youth Guarantee programme. We use an alternative identification strategy by exploiting the fact that in the Central Hungarian region, the programme started nine months later than in other parts of the country for administrative reasons. We apply a difference-indifferences framework to estimate the effect of the Youth Guarantee on eligible jobseekers' outcomes, and find a modest positive effect on employment in the 7-12 months after entering the register.
Agota Scharle
added a research item
This guide provides a step-by-step introduction to the counterfactual evaluation of labour market policies for youth with a focus on the use of administrative data. The main issues are illustrated by the practical problems encountered in evaluating hiring subsidies for youth in the four countries of the Youth Employment PartnerSHIP project (Spain, Hungary, Italy, and Poland). However, the guide can be applied to evaluating other programmes as well. The purpose of this guide is to provide a practical toolkit for researchers and managers of institutions carrying out evaluations (research, ministries, public employment services) who plan to initiate and coordinate youth employment programme evaluations. The guide summarises and illustrates common practical issues and problems that are specific to the counterfactual evaluation of policies designed for youth employment.
Claudia Villosio
added a research item
Italian younger workers – and women in particular – risk to be hit hard by the measures adopted to contrast Covid-19 epidemic
Mateusz Smoter
added a research item
Although labour market conditions are favourable, 750,000 young people in Poland are not in education, employment or training (NEET). Long-term unemployment at a young age may have negative social and economic consequences. Increasing the level of employment is desirable for demographic reasons. Activating this group of people represents a public policy challenge, since most of them are not looking for employment, and therefore do not receive support from labour market institutions. Most women in this group do not search for jobs because of family and childcare responsibilities, while the main reasons for men are poor health or disability. Improving access to nurseries, kindergartens and other forms of childcare, enabling part-time employment as well as removing architectural and transport barriers could facilitate entry in the labour market for those currently economically inactive who would like to work. This group may be assisted also through policies targeted at those who are unemployed or economically inactive but not registered at employment offices.
Marta Palczyńska
added an update
We are looking for a PhD student or a young researcher from ES, HU or IT for a short-term research stay at IBS (1-3 months). The person would be involved in the tasks related to the Youth Employment PartnerSHIP project. More details: http://yepartnership.ibs.org.pl/internship-at-ibs-in-warsaw
 
Iga Magda
added a project goal
The project will evaluate two set of initiatives: outreach activities of Public Employment Services (PES) and job trials/job subsidies to different job contracts offered to youth, with a particular attention paid to gender dimension of policy targeting and outcomes.