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Yoga Research

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Farah Shroff
added 3 research items
This paper explores yogic approaches to women's sexuality. Acknowledging that sexualized violence against women is a harsh and pernicious reality for women all over the world, the paper adopts an inclusive perspective on women's sexuality that focuses on pleasure. A basic introduction to yoga prefaces a discussion of prana (life force) and concepts of unity and oneness. These concepts provide a framework for yogic concepts of the body, with an emphasis on sexuality. Specific breathing exercises, meditations, poses, locks and seals are mentioned. The experience of one of Canada's most accomplished yoga teachers is also depicted. The paper concludes by affirming that women's positive experiences of sexuality may be heightened through yogic practices that assist in living in the body more fully. Given the vacuum of scholarly work in this area, this paper is a small step toward understanding the common ground between the vast subjects of yoga and women's sexual empowerment.
www.bridgew.edu/soas/jiws/May07/Schroff.pdf Abstract3 This paper explores yogic approaches to women's sexuality. Acknowledging that sexualized violence against women is a harsh and pernicious reality for women all over the world, the paper adopts an inclusive perspective on women's sexuality that focuses on pleasure. A basic introduction to yoga prefaces a discussion of prana (life force) and concepts of unity and oneness. These concepts provide a framework for yogic concepts of the body, with an emphasis on sexuality. Specific breathing exercises, meditations, poses, locks and seals are mentioned. The experience of one of Canada's most accomplished yoga teachers is also depicted. The paper concludes by affirming that women‟s positive experiences of sexuality may be heightened through yogic practices that assist in living in the body more fully. Given the vacuum of scholarly work in this area, this paper is a small step toward understanding the common ground between the vast subjects of yoga and women's sexual empowerment. Keywords: yoga, women‟s sexual empowerment, oppressive social structures
Eyes closed, back tall, legs folded, we connected—strangers yesterday, friends today. We‟re All One! Each member of the human family is a variation of the one. In yoga we know the teachings about this unity of all life forms and after traveling for one and a half years it means so much more to me. The lessons of yoga, profound and beautiful, were illustrated in each yoga class in many parts of the world. Our family of two adults and two kids traveled the world for 18 months recently and I taught yoga to many new friends along the way--in the Republic of Georgia, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Turkiye, Cyprus, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, India, Bulgaria and elsewhere. As we visited many places where yoga was unknown, I was often people‟s first yoga teacher. What an honor, to be the ambassador of this beautiful practise and witness the sweet tranquility that yoga brings to people‟s faces and bodies. I am continually in awe of yoga‟s ability to reach people at a deep level, even without shared (verbal) language. I was teaching people whose language was Arabic, Georgian, Mahrati, Turkish and so on, and these are not languages I speak.
Farah Shroff
added a research item
The need for effective population mental health promotion approaches is urgent as mental health concerns are escalating globally and current allopathic treatment regimens are insufficient to bring people towards the state of mental well-being (citation). Successfully alleviating stress has the potential to promote wellbeing and prevent illness. Worldwide, yoga is gaining popularity as an accessible, acceptable and cost-effective practice for mind and body. People are turning to yoga for mental health improvement because of preferences for: self-treatment as opposed to clinical intervention; perceived greater efficacy than medication; fewer side effects; lack of response to medication. Yoga has minimal side effects and is cost-effective in comparison with pharmacological treatments and psychotherapy. Yoga’s added benefit is that it improves physical fitness and encourages self-reliance. In this brief article we discuss the evidence for yoga as a form of mental health promotion, illness prevention and treatment for depression.