Project

Voice and Land Dispossession

Goal: Indigenous research into voice and land dispossession; women; narrative research; feminist research

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Project log

Robin Throne
added a research item
This chapter presents the results of a systematic review to analyze the current research since 2019 for voice dispossession as attributional accommodation among women in higher education leadership. The authors sought to quantify and categorize these attributes to better identify the verbal and nonverbal ac-commodations made by women in higher education leadership to extend prior critical review of gender parity and equity for these leaders. Study findings may inform higher educational leadership to better understand voice dispossession among female leaders and the resulting attributional accommodations made to improve gender equity and parity for leadership roles in higher education.
Robin Throne
added a research item
This chapter presents findings from a critical arts-based autoethnographic study of Iowa digital maps and historical archival data of the Iowa territory (1838-1846) for Indigenous Nations with previous land tenure. Researchers have noted land and voice dispossession for these Indigenous Nations resulting from forced removal followed by decades of intentional cultural erosion, forced assimilation, loss of language, and religious discrimination and persecution into the latter 20th century. Current research highlights the resultant damage of these historical losses on living descendants of Indigenous land-based cultures. Agency of self was explored from a socialized perspective of a descendant of Scandinavian immigrants who acquired dispossessed land within the Iowa territory. This was contrasted with a cultural perspective of land as capital wealth vs. the principles and tenets of land-based culture whereby agency may be strengthened via Indigenous knowledge rooted in land-based connections and environmental sensitivities. Data representation involved poetic excerpts of land as agency.
Robin Throne
added a research item
This critical review explored the current scholarship of the experiences and challenges faced by Gullah Geechee midlife women heirs’ property owners along the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor. Past researchers have noted these women often experience invisibility due to the concurrent burdens of management of jointly-owned property along the Corridor in addition to legacy experiences of cultural isolation, land dispossession, voice dispossession, and ancestry enslavement. Past researchers have called for ongoing collaborative research by both non-indigenous and indigenous researchers as a gap continues for gendered perspectives for current Corridor heirs’ property challenges and land dispossession with respect to power, trauma, economic impact, Gullah Geechee ways of knowing, land-based cultural values, heritage tourism, governmental dispossession, and the legacy of enslavement for critical inquiry from the transformative paradigm.
Robin Throne
added a research item
This chapter presents results of a heuristic and arts-based research critical inquiry and ongoing critical review of continued research into Lowcountry heirs’ property ownership and the recurrent generational challenges, governmental influences, and tourism impact on land dispossession and retention along the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor. Comparisons are explored across oceans and decades to illustrate the cyclical nature of research and attention into the phenomenon of land dispossession with the lens of Leavy’s concept of coherence to assess the paucity of contemporaneous narratives of voices of women landowners. Land tenure, voice and land dispossession, freedom as ownership, and the culture of home/place are also explored as well as the legacy of the African diaspora specifically among women landowners. A comparison/contrast is offered of the two critical qualitative data representations: a scholarly journal article and an arts-based research allegorical novella.
Robin Throne
added a research item
Indigenous cultures meticulously protect and preserve their traditions. Those traditions often have deep connections to the homelands of indigenous peoples, thus forming strong relationships between culture, land, and communities. Social justice research and the principles of indigenous research among other approaches can help shed new light on the nature and complexity of these relationships. Indigenous Research of Land, Self, and Spirit is a collection of innovative research that focuses on the ties between indigenous cultures and the constructs of land as self and agency. It also covers historical, critical, intersectional, feminist, social justice, and heuristic inquiries across a variety of indigenous peoples and cultures. Highlighting a broad range of topics including environmental studies, land rights, and storytelling, this book is ideally designed for policymakers, academicians, students, and researchers in the fields of sociology, diversity, anthropology, environmentalism, and history.
Robin Throne
added a research item
Postsecondary organizational statistics show women remain limited and underrepresented within presidential and provost appointments and progress has slowed into the 21st century. This chapter presents a critical review of the current scholarship of gender parity among higher education executive leadership specifically for a construct of voice dispossession. In past work, the authors have discussed voice dispossession occurs among a dominant past culture and imbalanced power domains amid hierarchical structures for evolving organizational cultures as women often adopt a filtered voice or make attributional accommodations amidst challenges within these power and gendered organizational structures. This chapter extends the conversation by examining this focus within the larger body of research into women in higher education executive leadership to reveal limits of access and career success. While these power domains have historically been predominant across North America, parallels exist among other continents.
Robin Throne
added a research item
This chapter presents findings from a critical arts-based autoethnographic study of Iowa digital maps and historical archival data of the Iowa territory (1838-1846) for Indigenous Nations with previous land tenure. Researchers have noted land and voice dispossession for these Indigenous Nations resulting from forced removal followed by decades of intentional cultural erosion, forced assimilation, loss of language, and religious discrimination and persecution into the latter 20th century. Current research highlights the resultant damage of these historical losses on living descendants of Indigenous land-based cultures. Agency of self was explored from a socialized perspective of a descendant of Scandinavian immigrants who acquired dispossessed land within the Iowa territory. This was contrasted with a cultural perspective of land as capital wealth vs. the principles and tenets of land-based culture whereby agency may be strengthened via Indigenous knowledge rooted in land-based connections and environmental sensitivities. Data representation involved poetic excerpts of land as agency. Keywords: Arts-Based Research, Capital Wealth, Indian Removal Act, Indigenous, Land Dispossession, Place-Thought, Self, Voice Dispossession
Robin Throne
added a research item
Postsecondary organizational statistics show women remain limited and underrepresented within presidential and provost appointments and progress has slowed into the 21st century. This chapter presents a critical review of the current scholarship of gender parity among higher education executive leadership specifically for a construct of voice dispossession. In past work, the authors have discussed voice dispossession occurs among a dominant past culture and imbalanced power domains amid hierarchical structures for evolving organizational cultures as women often adopt a filtered voice or make attributional accommodations amidst challenges within these power and gendered organizational structures. This chapter extends the conversation by examining this focus within the larger research conversation to consider research into women in higher education executive leadership for limits of access and career success. While these power domains have historically been predominant across North America, parallels exist among other continents.
Robin Throne
added a research item
FIFTH ANNIVERSARY EDITION An alternate retelling of the Sac & Fox relocation and settlement of the Iowa territory
Robin Throne
added a research item
An arts-based research allegorical novella Who owns a life? Roman civil law was the basis for eighteenth century South Carolina slavery legislation, and partus sequitur ventrem meant literally "that which is brought forth follows the womb," meaning a child was born a slave if the mother was a slave, free if the mother was free. This sparse yet dense tale captures the centuries-long emotional battle for seed, life, and land proffered, then repossessed as parcels of Lowcountry heirs' property. Along the African Gold Coast, deceased spirits often gathered at the waterside to prepare for the souls' return from whence they came; amidst Sea Island coastal views and tourism ridden over forgotten slave cemeteries, this detached narrative echoes three women who still hover there. Whisper. Drifting. May you stumble upon this allegoric account of captains, traders, planters, soldiers, and cotton and listen just long enough to hear these murmurings from this oceanside graveyard, the aching ancestral chatter above the din of tourism development.
Robin Throne
added 6 research items
On November 7, 1861, the U.S. Union Army occupied the Sea Islands following an invasion of the Port Royal Sound that left some 10,000 former slaves to be cared for and 80,000 confiscated acres of Sea Island plantation property to be cultivated (Hazzard, 2012; Ochiai, 2001; Rose, 1964; Rowland, Moore, & Rogers, 1996). A historical, economic, and cultural view of the Sea Islands and low country, a culturally and ecologically unique 250-mile stretch along the coast of South Carolina and Georgia (Brabec & Richardson, 2007; Rowland et al., 1996), is not complete without consideration of the Sea Island’s cotton economy (Ochiai, 2001; Porcher & Wick, 2005; Sink, 2010) and the particular strain of Sea Island cotton, the lucrative “silky staple” that sold for a premium at US$2 per pound, and was meticulously refined by seed selection, fertilization (saltmarsh mulch and oyster shells), cultivation, and gin techniques (Porcher & Wick, 2005; Sink, 2010). However, the harvest of the 90,000 pounds of this zenith and lucrative 1861 cotton crop, seized by the Union Army in the Port Royal occupation was difficult, if not impossible, without the free labor acquired via the experiment in the first year of the war (Hazzard, 2012; Ochiai, 2001; Porcher & Wick, 2005; Rose, 1964), which resulted in a US$500,000 profit for the U.S. treasury (Ochiai, 2001).
This paper uses the conventions of autoethnography, narrative research, writing as inquiry, and the artistic license of creative nonfiction to present a comparison of women’s narratives from the patrilineal Thunder Clan, the indigenous nation Sauk who were relocated from their summer home of Saukenuk, near the sacred confluence of the Mississippi and Sinnissippi (Rock) Rivers (N 41° 28.872 W 090° 36.945), to the Iowa Territory in 1825 and again to a sovereign reserve in Stroud, OK, and Gullah/Geechee nation Sea island heirs’ property owners. Leavy’s coherence is used as a framework to assess the paucity of contemporaneous narratives of women as landowners and women dispossessed of property. The culture of home/place and the construct of freedom are also explored among two distinct land cultures amid a turbulent 19th century of U.S. land dispossession.
Robin Throne
added a project goal
Indigenous research into voice and land dispossession; women; narrative research; feminist research