Archived project

Values and identities of the Visegrad countries' capitals

Goal: This project focuses on values and identities connected to the concept of a nation in the V4 capitals. Capitals are perceived as centres of national pride (Therborn 2006) and at the same time they are multicultural environments where diverse people interact daily. Voting behaviour in V4 capitals differs from the remaining populations where they vote significantly less for parties that use nationalist rhetoric (see SPD (CZ), Fidesz, Jobbik (HUN), ĽS-NS (SVK), PiS (POL)). This indicates that the nationalistic rhetoric is not so efficient in these places. The goal of the project is to moderate the extreme use of national identities topics in public, both through accelerating discussion and public education. The project is based on the idea of plurality of identity (Parekh 2009; Shokev & Erez 2008). Within this, we want to focus on national and EU identity, nationalism, social affiliation, political commitment, solidarity and trust, crisis phenomena and security sentiment, political alienation, radicalization, marginalization and civic awareness. This project 1. updates knowledge of national identity and associated values (after the African and Middle-East immigration wave); 2. deepens knowledge of the formation and expression of national identities and values in the capitals; 3. based on the findings, provides information on how to deal with the public narratives and problems linked to national identity to moderate its extreme impacts.

The project is co-financed by the Governments of Czechia, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia through Visegrad Grants from International Visegrad Fund. The mission of the fund is to advance ideas for sustainable regional cooperation in Central Europe.

Date: 1 February 2019 - 31 May 2020

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Project log

Ivan Jarabinský
added an update
Piscová, Magdalena. 2022. Identity and perception of capital cities by the city elites. The case of the Visegrad countries. Geografický časopis, 74(1), pp. 75-94. Available at: https://doi.org/10.31577/geogrcas.2022.74.1.04
 
Ivan Jarabinský
added an update
Csepeli, György, Örkény, Antal and Zsigó, T. Ferenc. 2020. Közép-Európai fővárosok mentális térképei. In: A.Gergely, András; Kapitány, Ágnes; Kapitány, Gábor; Kovács, Éva; Paksi, Veronika (ed.). Kultúra, közösség és társadalom. Budapest: Társadalomtudományi Kutatóközpont; Magyar Szociológiai Társaság, pp. 56-74. Available at: https://szociologia.tk.hu/uploads/files/2020/5_CsepeliGy_OrkenyA_ZsigoT.pdf
 
Ivan Jarabinský
added an update
Topolewska-Siedzik, Ewa and Cieciuch, Jan. 2020. Kołowy Model Sposobów Kształtowania się Tożsamości: założenia teoretyczne i empiryczna weryfikacja, Psychologia Rozwojowa, 25(3), pp. 13-32. Available at: https://www.ejournals.eu/Psychologia-Rozwojowa/2020/Numer-3-2020/art/18402/
 
Ivan Jarabinský
added a research item
Due to the recent attempts to divide Czech society based on the antagonism between Prague and the countryside, this study researches some of the aspects of this division—basic human values and the national identity of the inhabitants of Prague. These very basic level sources of the antagonism are researched via a combination of ISSP (National identity III module) and ESS (Round 8) surveys and two focus groups with Prague inhabitants. The results show that there are no real, or wrongly interpreted, differences between Praguers and people in the countryside with respect to both basic human values and Czech national identity. Regarding the basic human values of the two groups, only the conservation value dimension is stronger outside Prague. However, this value dimension is inherently ambiguous because its value of security is stronger within Prague, which is in contrast to values of conformity and tradition that are stronger outside Prague. In addition to this, conservation is still the stronger dimension within Prague compared with the openness to change value dimension. Praguers are rather compelled to be open and they are capable of adapting, even if their values are more conservative. The same values prevail among people within and outside Prague, which has been confirmed in the focus groups. There are also more similarities between the two groups in their national identities, e.g., when they are less nationalistic than patriotic. Both groups are of similar strength for patriotism and nationalism. The sources of national pride among the two groups are very similar and Praguers are those who can be labeled as being prouder in a few of the aspects of the Czech nation. The division between Praguers and non-Praguers seems to be rather artificial and based on inaccurate perceptions and/or interpretations.
Ivan Jarabinský
added an update
As part of our project, we just released popularizing video communicating some of our findings with the Central European societies...
Video available here: https://youtu.be/jf0vKa_46OU
 
Ivan Jarabinský
added an update
Feel free to join our conference on the values and identities of the Visegrad countries' capitals on 14. January 2020 in Prague. Registration is free of charge and highly recommended. More in the invitation attached.
 
Ivan Jarabinský
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The project is supported by the International Visegrad Fund.
 
Ivan Jarabinský
added a project goal
This project focuses on values and identities connected to the concept of a nation in the V4 capitals. Capitals are perceived as centres of national pride (Therborn 2006) and at the same time they are multicultural environments where diverse people interact daily. Voting behaviour in V4 capitals differs from the remaining populations where they vote significantly less for parties that use nationalist rhetoric (see SPD (CZ), Fidesz, Jobbik (HUN), ĽS-NS (SVK), PiS (POL)). This indicates that the nationalistic rhetoric is not so efficient in these places. The goal of the project is to moderate the extreme use of national identities topics in public, both through accelerating discussion and public education. The project is based on the idea of plurality of identity (Parekh 2009; Shokev & Erez 2008). Within this, we want to focus on national and EU identity, nationalism, social affiliation, political commitment, solidarity and trust, crisis phenomena and security sentiment, political alienation, radicalization, marginalization and civic awareness. This project 1. updates knowledge of national identity and associated values (after the African and Middle-East immigration wave); 2. deepens knowledge of the formation and expression of national identities and values in the capitals; 3. based on the findings, provides information on how to deal with the public narratives and problems linked to national identity to moderate its extreme impacts.
The project is co-financed by the Governments of Czechia, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia through Visegrad Grants from International Visegrad Fund. The mission of the fund is to advance ideas for sustainable regional cooperation in Central Europe.