Project

VISCED-20

Goal: This short project (June-August 2020) aims to provide better quality information to schools across Europe trying to cope with the situation of school closure and public lockdown. Even when (starting this work) the first wave of Covid-19 is “past the peak”, there is likely to be a second wave, and we have all learned that pandemics do occur nowadays in the West/North of the world. Moreover, other parts of the world tell us that pandemics are not the only crisis that schools have to cope with – earthquakes and hurricanes all too common..

The project has a focus on schools. This is because our expert opinion is that schools on the whole have not coped well with moving curriculum and teaching online whereas universities have done much better.

The project is named after the EU VISCED project which studied such issues 8 years ago - 2011-12.

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Project log

Paul Bacsich
added an update
On Monday 10 May 2021 Dualversity is holding the first Learning Resilience Network Symposium, covering best practice from lessons learned during the Covid-19 pandemic.
The purpose of the Learning Resilience Network is to bring together global virtual schools and colleges in a relatable forum.
The network itself is global and therefore we benefit from drawing experience on this transnational level.
Our speakers will share their experiences of best practice in emergency situations such as Covid-19.
Running order:
  • 4:30pm Introduction from our Chair: Michelle Selinger, CEO, ConsultEdu
  • 4:40pm Session 1: Jacqueline Daniell, CEO, Wey Education plc
  • 5:00pm Session 2: Santosh Kumar, CEO and Founder, 21K School
  • 5:20pm Session 3: Paul Bacsich, CEO, Dualversity
  • 5:40pm Q&A Facilitated by Michelle Selinger and Charlotte Doody (VISCED-20 project manager)
 
Paul Bacsich
added an update
Our first project at Dualversity is a short study looking at virtual schools across Europe, in the context of a selection of similar schools in other relevant countries (e.g. Canada, Australia, New Zealand, a few in US) to gain an up to date view of pedagogic and technological best practice and how it can apply to place-based schools, and in particular aiming to capture the extent to which virtual schools have contributed directly or indirectly to the resilience of schooling in the target countries during the period when place-based schooling was ceased or shrunk. The research period runs from now till end October.
For details see attached file. We shall be making questionnaires available and carrying out interviews with institutions and experts. We are working from the 2012 EU knowledge base from the VISCED project at augmented by more recent smaller studies; in particular if your school is NOT on the list of virtual schools on http://www.virtualeducation.wiki please get in touch directly with us. Paul Bacsich at #dualversity
 
Paul Bacsich
added an update
This short project (June-August 2020) aims to provide better quality information to schools across Europe trying to cope with the situation of school closure and public lockdown. Even when (at the time of writing this proposal) this phase of Covid-19 is “past the peak”, there is likely to be a second wave, during or before the “new normal” many talk about, and we have all learned the hard way that pandemics do occur nowadays in the West/North of the world. Moreover, other parts of the world tell us that pandemics are not the only crisis that schools have to cope with – earthquakes (as in New Zealand) and hurricanes (as in Caribbean) all too common.
The paper has a focus on schools. This is because our expert opinion is that schools have not coped well with moving curriculum and teaching online whereas universities have.
In more detail, universities have put much teaching on to the internet and while there have been many criticisms (often by e-learning gurus) of what they have done, by and large they seem to have coped – and they had a deadline to achieve. Of course it helped that many universities had relatively little teaching to do in the post-Easter weeks. It also helped that many universities had already installed Virtual Learning Environments (even if they were not using them much), that many do some online distance learning (even if just in a few small departments), that most make some attempt at blended learning, and that the European Associations (EADTU, EDEN and also ICDE) have made good progress in providing general advice including leveraging on their members (such as open universities) with substantial long-term experience with online distance learning
In contrast, the situation with schools is far less satisfactory. By and large none of the above factors are in play for them.
The situation described in 2011 in a series of VISCED reports for the European Commission (http://www.virtualeducation.wiki/index.php/VISCED) still apply:
* most place-based schools have ICT too limited to cope with fast moves to fully online working (the years of austerity in state budgets since the 2008 crash have not helped)
* virtual schools in many European countries remain small in number and lacking in influence even within their host nation
* there is no cross-over of knowledge from virtual schools to face-to-face schools
* virtual schools are not active in any European Associations that focus on ICT and that place-based schools belong to.
This project aims to plug that gap. It is to be based on
i) a series of consultations with a selection of existing virtual schools in Europe, placed in a wider context of virtual schools outside Europe,
ii) correlated with what some advanced place-based schools in Europe are doing when they were fortunate enough to have already made heavy use of ICT and
iii) augmented by interviews with HE e-learning experts on the applicability of university e-learning approaches to schools (especially senior secondary schools).
It will also look at the value of setting up a European Network of Virtual Schools to be a lobby group and advisory body to government departments.
 
Paul Bacsich
added a project goal
This short project (June-August 2020) aims to provide better quality information to schools across Europe trying to cope with the situation of school closure and public lockdown. Even when (starting this work) the first wave of Covid-19 is “past the peak”, there is likely to be a second wave, and we have all learned that pandemics do occur nowadays in the West/North of the world. Moreover, other parts of the world tell us that pandemics are not the only crisis that schools have to cope with – earthquakes and hurricanes all too common..
The project has a focus on schools. This is because our expert opinion is that schools on the whole have not coped well with moving curriculum and teaching online whereas universities have done much better.
The project is named after the EU VISCED project which studied such issues 8 years ago - 2011-12.