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UCL Institute of Archaeology Bronze Age Landscapes of Bodmin Moor Project

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Project log

Sue Hamilton
added a research item
Preliminary report on some of the results of the first season of work at Leskernick Hill, Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. Cornish Archaeology 34
Mike Seager Thomas
added an update
I have now started to upload the previously unpublished Leskernick diaries (that is diaries written for the project by participants other than the Project Directors). These can be found at https://archive.org/details/@haggis_the_cat
 
Mike Seager Thomas
added a research item
Over five seasons, the archaeology team of the UCL Bodmin Moor Bronze Age Landscapes Project, under the direction of Professor (then Dr) Sue Hamilton, conducted excavations on a number of still upstanding prehistoric structures on and below Leskernick Hill, Bodmin Moor (Bender, Hamilton & Tilley, 2007). Fraught with difficulties both because of the upstanding nature of the site itself and the peculiar pedological and geomorphological conditions prevailing on the moor (peculiar that is to an excavator used to working on truncated lowland sites), these excavations, many directly supervised by or overseen by the writer, represented a major interpretative challenge to the project. The present paper outlines the nature of that challenge, the lessons we learned from it as excavators, and, by applying these to the record from a second Bronze Age settlement (nearby Stannon Down), its relevance to the Bronze Age archaeology of the southwest and to excavation and excavators generally. This article was submitted for publication once—to the journal Geoarchaeology—and was robustly rejected by its US editor on the grounds of its style, which he considered better suited to a personal chronicle, because it includes no analytical data, because he considered it had nothing new to say, and because, he said, it breached all academic protocols. It is not a great article but I think he rather missed the point. Or perhaps not. Maybe it was a wilfully destructive response to to an alternative approach and point of view. Either way, this is the effect it had, for after a second such rejection from Geoarchaeology—both sent on Christmas Eve—I more or less stopped writing archaeology for journal publication.