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Tradução de Paradise Lost, de John Milton

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Fabiano Seixas Fernandes
added 2 research items
The present article aims at undertaking an analysis of the argumentative component of a passage from John Milton’s Paradise Lost, which is intended to shed light on some compositional aspects of the epic’s protagonist, Lucifer/Satan. The passage selected for analysis is the one in which Satan convinces Eve to eat of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. Its analysis was undertaken using an adapted version of the theoretical framework proposed by Douglas Walton (2008)
A fama internacional de John Milton (1608-74) se deve a seu épico Paradise Lost (1667; 2.ed.1674), cujo explícito objetivo é “justificar aos homens os proce- dimentos de Deus” (01.26), ou seja: promover uma justificativa da queda, responsabilizando a humani- dade por sua ruína, isentando a divina providência e lhe confirmando a misericórdia. O artigo propõe que se pense Paradise Lost como um experimento mental centrado no conceito de livre-arbítrio: a estratégia de Milton consistiria em manipular ou inserir episódios nas possíveis lacunas do básico enredo bíblico que lhe serve de base, que preenchessem as condições necessárias para se dizer que as personagens agem de modo consciente e suficientemente racional para que sejam responsabilizadas por suas infelizes escolhas. Milton ofereceria, assim, uma solução narrativa a um problema filosófico. John Milton’s (1608-74) international fame is due to his epic poem, Paradise Lost (1667; 2nd.ed.1674). The poem’s explicit goal is to “justify the ways of God to men” (01.26), that is: to promote a justification of the Fall, which would hold humanity responsible for its own demise while redeeming Divine Providence and confirming its mercy. This article proposes that Paradise Lost be conceived as a thought experiment: Milton’s strategy would be to manipulate or insert episodes in the possible gaps found in its underlying biblical narrative, so that they would fulfil the necessary conditions for the characters to be shown as conscious and satisfactorily rational agents, who could be held accountable for their unhappy choices. Milton would have thus offered a narrative solution for a philosophical problem.