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Tracking Growth of Data Protection Globally

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David Banisar
added an update
I have updated the global map of data protection laws and initiatives. It now includes China, Belarus, Ecuador, Zambia and the British Virgin Islands. Current count is 138 jurisdictions now have comprehensive data protection laws (118 UN Member States) and another 30 with bills.
 
David Banisar
added a research item
Approximately 100 countries around the world have adopted national right to information laws or national ordinances/regulations. This map shows all the countries that have adopted laws, regulations or have pending efforts. Updated March 2013.
David Banisar
added a research item
Nearly 140 countries and independently governed jurisdictions and territories around the world have now adopted comprehensive data protection/privacy laws to protect personal data held by private and public bodies. Another 30 countries and jurisdictions including India, Mongolia, Nigeria, Iran, and Indonesia have pending bills or initiatives. The laws in these countries apply to personal information held in both electronic and physical form and to all or nearly all subject areas. In nearly all of the countries, the laws apply to personal information held by private bodies and by governments. In nearly all of the countries, an independent data protection or information commission oversees and enforces the laws. Most laws have also included specific exemptions for the media while a few also specifically refer to national right to information laws. This map shows which jurisdictions have adopted laws or have pending initiatives. This update includes new countries which adopted laws in the last year including China, Belarus, Ecuador, Zambia, and the British Virgin Islands.
David Banisar
added an update
10 new countries have adopted laws in the last 2 years including Algeria, Brazil, Lebanon, Panama, Tajikistan, Uganda, and Uzbekistan. There are pending bills in Kenya, Nigeria, Iran, and Indonesia.
 
David Banisar
added a research item
National Right to Information Laws, Regulations and Initiatives 2017 Nearly 120 countries around the world have adopted national right to information laws or national ordinances/regulations. This map shows all the countries that have adopted laws, regulations or have pending efforts. Updated September 2017 to include Kenya, Tanzania, East Timor, Monaco and others.
David Banisar
added 5 research items
Privacy is a fundamental human right recognized in all major international treaties and agreements on human rights. Nearly every country in the world recognizes privacy as a fundamental human right in their constitution, either explicitly or implicitly. Most recently drafted constitutions include specific rights to access and control one's personal information. There is a growing trend towards the enactment of comprehensive privacy and data protection acts around the world. Currently over 40 countries and jurisdictions have or are in the process of enacting such laws. Countries are adopting these laws in many cases to address past governmental abuses (such as in former East Bloc countries), to promote electronic commerce, or to ensure compatibility with international standards developed by the European Union, the Council of Europe, and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Many countries have also adopted Freedom of Information laws. This paper provides details of the state of privacy in over fifty countries around the world. It outlines the constitutional and legal conditions of privacy protection, and summarizes important issues and events relating to privacy and surveillance.
The right to privacy and the right to information are both essential human rights in the modern information society. For the most part, these two rights complement each other in holding governments accountable to individuals. But there is a potential conflict between these rights when there is a demand for access to personal information held by government bodies. Where the two rights overlap, states need to develop mechanisms for identifying core issues to limit conflicts and for balancing the rights.This paper examines legislative and structural means to better define and balance the rights to privacy and information.
Over 90 countries and jurisdictions around the world have adopted comprehensive data protection/privacy laws to protect personal data held by both governments and private companies. This map shows which countries have adopted laws or have pending initiatives to adopt one. The new version now includes small jurisdictions and island states. Note: This map has been updated- see National Comprehensive Data Protection/Privacy Laws and Bills 2021. https://ssrn.com/abstract=1951416