Project

Time Research Community

Goal: The Time Research Community was born out of the burgeoning interest in researching time and temporality in organizations. We aim to establish and maintain a platform for exchange, discussion, and development on time and organization by bringing together scholars from several areas of research and teaching, including organization studies, entrepreneurship, innovation studies, business history, strategy, management and leadership and technology studies. We would like to encourage novel and exciting studies of the role of time, moving beyond the current reification of “clock time” to understanding time and temporality as key to understanding how emergence, continuity and change of any organizational actors or form takes place in the flow of time.
In particular, we will encourage activities being developed, such as:
- Paper presentations and track organizing at prestigious academic conferences,
- Seminar series and workshops,
- Reading groups, and
- Networking.

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Project log

Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Centre for Organization and Time (COT) invites you to the next @bout time seminar. This time we teamed up with CHRONOS. Prof. Elena Giovannoni will give a talk on "Travelling to Mars and beyond: time, (in)calculability and performance measurements". Time and Date: May 19th 2022, 10.00 - 12.00 Location: Room: Ks71, Copenhagen Business School, Kilevej 14 A, 2000 Frederiksberg or online Please register through this link: https://lnkd.in/dyBM-w6K
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
Tor Hernes has published a new book on "Organization & Time" that may be of interest to many of you.
Please join us for the launch of the new book on April 26, 2022 at 15:30
at Kilevej 14A, 2000 Frederiksberg, Room Ks54 OR online.
Please sign up through this link: https://lnkd.in/eTvauG4D
Link to the book: https://lnkd.in/eeN7QPcR
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
We are delighted to invite you to our 3rd @bout time seminar this Spring with Prof. Tammar Zilber
on "Maintaining the Institutional Order throughout a Crisis: Reconstructions of Place, Time and Emotions in Israeli High-Tech 2001-4".
Time: May 2. 2020 - 14.30 to 16.30
Location: Kilevej 14A, 2000 Frederiksberg, Room K 150 OR online
Please sign up through this link: https://lnkd.in/e5qv_fxm
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
We are delighted to invite you to our next bout time seminar with Prof. Jochen Koch on "Path, pace, pattern: time and temporality in self-reinforcing processes".
Time: April 25 - 14:00 to 16:00
Location: Kilevej 14A, 2000 Frederiksberg, Room K146 OR online
Please sign up here: https://cbs.nemtilmeld.dk/411/
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Special Issue of Strategic Organization on “Temporal Work: The Strategic Organization of Time” edited by Tima Bansal, Juliane Reinecke, Roy Suddaby, and Ann Langley is now out: https://journals.sagepub.com/toc/soqa/current
Many interesting articles in this issue - and you can currently download them paywall-free.
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Centre for Organization and Time (COT) is delighted to announce the first @bout time seminar in 2022. Prof. Mikkel Flyverbom will give a presentation on the very timely topic of ”Anticipation and Organizing: Seeing, knowing and governing futures”.
Time and Date
March 16th 2021 14.00 – 16.00
Location Copenhagen Business School, Kilevej 14 A, 2000 Frederiksberg
Please register using the following link: https://cbs.nemtilmeld.dk/382/
We are working on a hybrid concept for this event. If you would like to join online, please send a mail to Vera (vcs.ioa@cbs.dk)
We hope you can join us!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
For those .who are attending this year's EGOS in Vienna, please have a look at the PDW 01: Theorizing Desirable Futures convened by Ali Aslan Gümüsay, Juliane Reinecke, and Tor Hernes
This PDW will open up the conversation about what a new future-oriented research agenda might look like, with the aim to develop new ways of theorizing desirable futures.
Application: Please submit – via the EGOS website – by April 30, 2022 a single document of application (.docx or .pdf file) that includes the following information:
  • A short summary (0.5–1 page) of a proposed or current project explaining the project and the relation to the PDW theme. Please include full details of name, affiliation, and email address.
  • Indication of preference for the roundtables.
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
Dear all,
We would like to draw your attention to the Call for Short Papers of the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) 01. The fourth sub-theme of the SWG 01 will concern Organization and Time: Time as X and X as Time.
Convenors:
Blagoy Blagoev
Technical University Dresden, Germany
Melissa A. Mazmanian
University of California, Irvine, USA
Mar Pérezts
emlyon business school & OCE Research Center, France
Questions related to time and temporality have moved from the periphery to the core of organization studies. Scholars are increasingly drawing on a temporal lens as to examine a wide range of organizational phenomena, including strategy, innovation, routine dynamics, sustainability, identity, as well as work and occupations, to name but a few. This development is indicative of a profound and ongoing shift in how we think about time in organization studies: scholars are increasingly moving away from considering time either in terms of longitudinal studies (time as a background continuum) or as a phenomenon separate from organizing (time as an independent variable). Instead, they are beginning to study organizational phenomena as temporal(ized), i.e., as constituted in and through time.
This ongoing shift has inspired us, in this fourth sub-theme of the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) 01, to push the boundaries of how we think about organization and time, how we conceptualize their interconnections, and how we explore them empirically. We aim to do so by opening up the possibilities with “Time as X and X as Time”, where our understanding of ‘X’ is enhanced by viewing it through a temporal theoretical and/or empirical lens, and conversely, where our understanding of time can, in turn, be enriched by what ‘X’ brings to the conversation. For example, one could imagine generative papers taking the perspective of “Power as Time and Time as Power;” “Time as Structure and Structure as Time;” “Time as History and History as Time;” or “Time as Affect and Affect as Time.” That said, we are interested in all papers that take expansive and empirical perspectives on time in and around organizations.
Overall, we expect papers in this sub-theme to showcase the centrality of time across a wide range of organization theories (i.e., how time can become a more central element in organizational studies as a whole) and phenomena (i.e., what is gained by temporalizing our understanding of organization and organizing). In addition to pursuing the established scholarly work on the importance of time in well-trodden areas such as strategic change (e.g., Kunisch et al., 2017), process perspectives (e.g., Hernes, 2014), totalizing work regimes and overwork (Perlow, 1999; Blagoev & Schreyögg, 2019; Beckman & Mazmanian, 2020), we would welcome novel and less common lenses. We particularly value and encourage submissions that tackle unconventional, provocative, and challenging questions or approaches, in order to bring a whiff of fresh air while reflecting on time down ‘roads less travelled by’, to echo Robert Frost’s poem.
Topics and questions that we look forward to discussing during this sub-theme could include, but are not limited to the following:
  • Time use as a signal of identity, power, and performance in organizations (Feldman et. al., 2020).
  • Specific facets or manifestations of time, such as speed, acceleration (Rosa, 2015; Rosa & Scheuerman, 2008), instantaneity, slowness, deceleration.
  • The ongoing negotiation of past-present-future connections, not least in and through history (e.g., Suddaby, 2016; Mills et al. 2016; Wadhwani et al. 2018), events (e.g. Badiou, 2011; Hussenot & Missonier, 2016), or memory (e.g., Blagoev et al.,  2018).
  • Tensions between the near and the distant future (e.g., Hernes & Schultz, 2020) and the performative effects of imagined futures in the present (e.g., Augustine et al., 2019).
  • Issues of temporal patterning and temporal structuring (e.g., Orlikowski & Yates, 2002), in particular in complex and dynamic work settings (e.g., Kremser & Blagoev, 2021).
  • The subjective (Shipp & Jansen, 2021) and affective dimensions of time, e.g., as related to boredom, ennui, spleen, alienation (for example, during the lockdown periods amidst the Covid-19 pandemic).
  • Time and crisis management in relation to, e.g., pandemics, refugee crises, climate change and other ‘urgent’ grand challenges (e.g., Reinecke & Ansari, 2015; Slawinski & Bansal, 2015; Kim et al., 2019).
  • Time and digitization, including big data, algorithms, surveillance capitalism, and real-time sociomaterial interactions.
  • Time and materiality, including bodies, embodiment, and the senses as well as space and (de-)spatialization (e.g., Rodrigues Araujo, 2008; Steyaert, 2015; Hernes et al., 2020)
  • Time-based control tools or processes: Just-in-time manufacturing, high-frequency trading, slow vs. fast food, artificial intelligence and predictive algorithms, real-time omnipresent surveillance, and generally to explore forms of “numericalization” (e.g. Pérezts, Andersson & Lindebaum, 2021) of time (even beyond clock-time) and time-based reifications.
References
  • Augustine, G., Soderstrom, S., Milner, D., & Weber, K. (2019): “Constructing a distant future: Imaginaries in geoengineering.” Academy of Management Journal, 62 (6), 1930–1960.
  • Badiou, A. (2011): Being and Event. London: Continuum.
  • Beckman, C., & Mazmanian, M.A. (2020): Dreams of the Overworked. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
  • Blagoev, B., Felten, S., & Kahn, R. (2018): “The career of a catalogue: Organizational memory, materiality and the dual nature of the past at the British Museum (1970–today).” Organization Studies, 39 (12), 1757–1783.
  • Blagoev, B., & Schreyögg, G. (2019): “Why do extreme work hours persist? Temporal uncoupling as a new way of seeing.” Academy of Management Journal, 62 (6), 1818–1847.
  • Feldman, E, Reid, E., & Mazmanian, M. (2020): “Signs of our time: Time-use as dedication, performance, identity, and power in contemporary workplaces.” Academy of Management Annals, 14 (2), 598–626.
  • Hernes, T. (2014): A Process Theory of Organization. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Hernes, T., & Schultz, M. (2020): “Translating the distant into the present: How actors address distant past and future events through situated activity.” Organization Theory, 1 (1), 1–20.
  • Hussenot, A., & Missonier, S. (2016): “Encompassing novelty and stability: An events-based approach.” Organization Studies, 37 (4), 523–546.
  • Kim, A., Bansal, P., & Haugh, H. (2019): “No time like the present: How a present time perspective can foster sustainable development.” Academy of Management Journal, 62 (2), 607–634.
  • Kremser, W., & Blagoev, B. (2021): “The dynamics of prioritizing: How actors temporally pattern complex role–routine ecologies.” Administrative Science Quarterly, 66 (2), 339–379.
  • Kunisch, S., Bartunek, J.M., Mueller, J., & Huy, Q.N. (2017): “Time in strategic change research.” Academy of Management Annals, 11 (2), 1005–1064.
  • Mills, A.J., Suddaby, R., Foster, W.M., & Durepos, G. (2016): “Re-visiting the historic turn 10 years later: current debates in management and organizational history – an introduction.” Management & Organizational History, 11 (2), 67–76.
  • Orlikowski, W.J., & Yates, J. (2002): “It’s about time: Temporal structuring in organizations.” Organization Science, 13 (6), 684–700.
  • Pérezts, M., Andersson, L., & Lindebaum, D. (2021): “Numbers and Organization Studies: Book Review Symposium Editorial.” Organization Studies, 42 (8), 1351–1356.
  • Perlow, L. A. (1999): “The time famine: Toward a sociology of work time.” Administrative Science Quarterly, 44 (1), 57–81.
  • Reinecke, J., & Ansari, S. (2015): “When times collide: Temporal brokerage at the intersection of markets and developments.” Academy of Management Journal, 58 (2), 618–648.
  • Rodrigues Araujo, E. (2008): “Technology, gender and time: a contribution to the debate.” Gender, Work & Organization, 15 (5), 477–503.
  • Rosa, H. (2015): Social Acceleration: A New Theory of Modernity. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Rosa, H. & Scheuerman, W.E. (eds.) (2008): High-speed Society: Social Acceleration, Power and Modernity. University Park: Penn State University Press.
  • Shipp, A.J., & Jansen, K.J. (2021): “The ‘other’ time: A review of the subjective experience of time in organizations.” Academy of Management Annals, 15 (1), 299–334.
  • Slawinski, N., & Bansal, P. (2015): “Short on time: Intertemporal tensions in business sustainability.” Organization Science, 26 (2), 531–549.
  • Steyaert, C. (2015): “Three Women. A Kiss. A life. On the queer writing of time in organization.” Gender Work & Organizations, 22 (2), 163–178.
  • Suddaby, R. (2016): “Toward a historical consciousness: Following the historic turn in management thought.” M@n@gement, 1(1), 46–60.
  • Wadhwani, R.D., Suddaby, R., Mordhorst, M., & Popp, A. (2018): “History as organizing: Uses of the past in Organization Studies.” Organization Studies, 39 (12), 1663–1683.
The deadline for submission of short papers is Tuesday, January 11, 2022, 23:59:59 CET.
Your short paper should comprise 3,000 words (incl. references, all appendices and other material).
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
This year the EGOS standing working group on Organization & Time organized the sub-theme The Situated Activity of Time Enactment convened by Tor Hernes, Joanna Karmowska and Claus Rerup.
The sub-theme’s contributions focused on the situated, on-going activity of time enactment in organizations. ”The on-going time enactment is crucial for understanding a host of issues, including the very agency of the moment, the roles of temporal structures, and the on-going interplay between evoked pasts and projected futures.” (Hernes, Karmowska, & Rerup. 2021) Hence, this year’s sessions spanned from Historical Horizons over Values and Emotions, Sustainable Development, Temporal Structures, Temporal Multiplicity to Futurizing.
Big thanks to everyone for fantastic papers, insightful comments, and engaging discussions, and special thanks to the convenors for making this year’s sub-theme a great success!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
Hello from Prof. Abbie Shipp who shared with us the following great initiative:
As you may have seen today, the program for the 2021 Academy of Management annual conference has been released. Click here to log in to the 2021 AOM program (you must be registered for the conference): https://2021.aom.org/login
Abbie has created an open spreadsheet in Google Sheets where you can add interesting papers, symposia, and the like—anything related to time, temporal issues, dynamism, change, etc. Please click here to view and add to the list of time-related sessions: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ZVBbcVbcM5noIkWvvG8dg2UPitOxn8V8beyYSnwNuSQ/edit#gid=0
Thanks in advance for sharing the interesting sessions you find!
We are looking forward to seeing you in August!
 
Tor Hernes
added a research item
This is the opening part of my forthcoming book Organization and Time. Observed through a temporal lens, organizational life fluctuates among moments of instantaneity, enduring continuity, and imagination of distant times. This movement stems from the fact that actors are continually faced with multiple intersecting temporalities, obliging them to make choices about what to do in the present, how to understand the past they emerge from, and how to stake out a possible future. Although scholars have widely recognized actors’ multitemporal reality, it remains to be more fully theorized into an integrative framework. In this book, Tor Hernes takes up this challenge by combining foundational ideas from philosophy, sociology, and organization theory into an integrative theoretical framework of organizational time. Based on a review of the literature, his definition of time includes four dimensions: experience, events, resource, and practice. He provides examples of how these four dimensions evolve through mutual interplay and how they are underpinned by what he calls narrative trajectory. He then discusses implications for key topics in organizational research, including materiality, leadership and continuity and change. Organization and Time is for scholars and advanced students of organization studies, management studies, technology studies, and sociology.
Majken Schultz
added 5 research items
The organic and hence perishable nature of food makes it particularly useful for understanding how the temporal dimension of materiality influences organizing and innovation. We present, as our main theoretical contribution, the concept of ‘material temporality’ to account for the transformation of materials in time and their imagined states at different moments across time, which we label processual and epochal temporality, respectively. Our empirical study shows how two organizations in the beer and dairy industries searched for novel solutions in their past and future. We show how the organizations’ potential for more consequential innovation was greater when they engaged distant past or future epochal temporalities. However, distant epochal temporality may also become uncertain and contested through the lens of ongoing processual temporality. We discuss the implications of material temporality for industries other than food and for organizing in relation to the natural environment.
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Centre for Organization and Time is delighted to announce the next @bout time webinar. This time Prof. Abbie Shipp will give a presentation on "The ‘Other’ Time: Insights and Unresolved Questions about Subjective Time in Organizations". She will discuss insights from a review of the subjective time research in organizations, with a particular emphasis on unresolved questions that remain for future research.
Time and Date
June 8th 2021 15.00– 16.30 CEST
Format
Webinar on Microsoft Teams.
Presentation by Abbie Shipp followed by a joint discussion.
Registration
Please email sls.ioa@cbs.dk to receive the Teams invitation link
We hope you can join us! We are looking forward to an interesting debate on time and temporality!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
This Friday the Routines Research Community holds another meeting that might also be of interest for some of you. Thank you Conor Horan for forwarding the info! Looking forward to a great debate.
Routines Research Community Meeting 9th April 2020 NOTE: All times are BST Dublin, London, Lisbon. 11 AM – 12:00 PM Introduction to Routine Dynamics & Process Based Research - PhD/New Researcher Session co-facilitated by Katharina Dittrich & Luciana D’Adderio. This introductory session is for PhD students and new researchers to Routine Dynamics. A Q&A session is included. To attend this please email conor.horan@tudublin.ie and a Zoom link will be circulated beforehand. The facilitators have asked that you review the following; The Preface & Chapter 1 of the Cambridge Handbook of Routine Dynamics. These can be found at: https://www.researchgate.net/project/RoutinesResearchCommunity/update/5f92f332e66b860001aaa00f Please read 1 of the following papers; Dittrich, Katharina; Guérard, Stéphane; Seidl, David (2016): Talking About Routines. The Role of Reflective Talk in Routine Change. In Organization Science 27 (3), pp. 678–697. DOI: 10.1287/orsc.2015.1024. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/289556339_Talking_About_Routines_The_Role_of_Reflective_Talk_in_Routine_Change D’Adderio, L. (2014). The Replication Dilemma Unravelled: How Organizations Enact Multiple Goals in Routine Transfer. Organization Science, 25(5), 1325-1350. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263132331_The_Replication_Dilemma_Unravelled_How_Organizations_Enact_Multiple_Goals_in_Routine_Transfer To attend this session lease email conor.horan@tudublin.ie VIRTUAL LUNCH 1 PM – 2PM Keynote Speaker: Prof Haridimos Tsoukas on the Developments in Process Based Research Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID : 820 2799 2402 | Passcode 691025 https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82027992402?pwd=ajBTNmZ3eGw0ODROcWlzL25rNExOQT09 2 PM – 2:45 PM 3 Concurrent Roundtable Session(s) – 45minutes Roles & Routines Hosts: Blagoy Blagoev, Jeannette Eberhard, Waldemar Kremser & Virginia Rosales-Orquera Routines are a concept that helps us theorize how people ‘get things done’ in organizations. But organizations are more than tools for ‘getting things done.’ They are also webs of social relations among people, where ‘getting along with each other’ – usually theorized through the concept of roles – is at least as important as ‘getting things done.’ In this roundtable, we will explore how roles enriched our research on routines and invite participants to do the same. We will contrast the dynamics and patterning of roles and routines, and discuss how their interplay enables us to shed new light on small and large phenomena in and around organizations. Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 857 7817 4948 | Kenncode: 2 https://radbouduniversity.zoom.us/j/85778174948?pwd=dHhvWE92c0VIQ1hobVJpRS8zQVdlQT09 The Paradox of Temporary Organising Hosts: Simon Addyman, Susanna Hedborg Bengtsson Projects, as forms of temporary organising, in industries such as construction and infrastructure, are seen as the appropriate organisational form for capital expenditure. Yet when we bring together the literature on temporary organisations and organisational routines we observe a paradoxical situation. Organisational routines are defined as “repetitive, recognisable patterns of interdependent actions, carried out by multiple participants” (Feldman and Pentland, 2003:95) and hence carry an underlying assumption that the organisation ‘already exists’ in the ‘ongoing present’, capable of routine re-creation. Projects, as temporary organisations, carry an underlying assumption that the organisation does not exist in the ‘ongoing present’ until ‘created anew’ and given, ex-ante, a time delimited life cycle (Lundin and Söderholm, 1995). This ‘newness’ characteristic of temporary organisations suggests a lack of ‘repeatable and recognisable patterns of action’, making them potentially unstable arrangements until participants have exchanged information, reduced uncertainty and routines are (re)created". Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 971 0830 0954 |Passcode 114259 https://ucl.zoom.us/j/97108300954?pwd=cVMvTENPYmN2U2NQbGdjMmhuTWFRZz09 Bodies and Routines Hosts: Charlotte Blanche & Martha Feldman This roundtable sheds light on bodies in the dynamics of routines. Though the body has just begun to be theorized in Routine Dynamics research, the body is, nonetheless, pervasive. We show how ubiquitous the bodies are in Routine Dynamics research by documenting the embodied orientation “to” and “from” performing, “to” and “from” patterns, and “to” and “from” situation or materiality in 13 reference articles. By exploring one of these articles in more depth, we show how theorizing the body more explicitly has potential for deepening our understanding of the processual mechanisms of routine. Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 814 8265 6099 |Passcode 743797 https://hecmontreal.zoom.us/j/81482656099?pwd=YW1UT0lZdUdZYjlnT3VjYnBsOGprQT09 2:45 PM – 3:30 PM Open Governance Session
Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 830 2102 3169 |Passcode 365238 https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83021023169?pwd=UTh0UWZScDZicldlSEVURjJaRlh3dz09
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Centre for Organization and Time (CBS) would like to invite you to an @bout time webinar Natalie Slawinski . We are delighted that Natalie will give us some insights on TEMPORAL AMBIDEXTERITY: How Organizations Navigate Temporal Paradoxes. She will discuss key insights from a study of the social enterprise Shorefast, along with implications for research on temporality and paradox.
Time and Date
April 21st 2021 14.00– 15.30 CET
Format
Webinar on Microsoft Teams.
Presentation by Natalie Slawinski followed by a joint discussion.
Registration
Please email sls.ioa@cbs.dk to receive the Teams invitation link
We hope you can join us! We are looking forward to a timely discussion!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Centre for Organizational Time (CBS) would like to invite you to the first @bout time webinar in 2021. We are delighted that Innan Sasaki will give a talk on Reflections from using time in research: Past, present, and future. More information on the talk you will find below.
Time and Date
March 17th 2021
13.00– 15.00 CET
Format Webinar on Microsoft Teams.
Presentation by Innan Sasaki followed by a joint discussion.
Registration
Please email sls.ioa@cbs.dk to receive the Teams invitation link
We hope you can join us!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
We, from the Centre for Organization and Time at Copenhagen Business School, are happy to invite applications for 3 postdoc positions in the field of organizational analysis, innovation and climate change. Expected starting dates are to be agreed upon.
The postdoc positions have a duration of three years (including one year of teaching responsibility). They are part of a project funded by the Novo Nordisk Foundation entitled Making ‘Distant Futures Actionable – Innovating for a Zero-Carbon Future’. The project is managed by Professor Majken Schultz and Professor Tor Hernes at the Centre for Organization and Time at the Department of Organization.
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
Dear all,
We would like to draw your attention to the Call for Short Papers of the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) 01. The third sub-theme of the SWG 01 will concern the more situated, on-going activity of time enactment in organizations.
Convenors:
Tor Hernes
Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Joanna Karmowska
Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom
Claus Rerup
Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, Germany
The on-going time enactment is crucial for understanding a host of issues, including the very agency of the moment, the roles of temporal structures, and the on-going interplay between evoked pasts and projected futures. It will lend focus to temporal structure, including routines, practices and materiality, through which time is enacted in organizations. It will connect the situated time enactment to different variations and combinations of near and distant pasts and futures, while considering factors such as agency, emotions and aesthetics. The empirical focus invites, but not exclusively, papers on topics such as digitalisation, creative organizations and start-ups.
This sub-theme is intended to provide the opportunity for organizational scholars to appreciate the temporal qualities of their research phenomena and to position their work within the broader studies on time and organizations. We are open to variety of approaches to studying organization and time as we strive to identify and build more comprehensive theoretical frameworks on the subject. Our goal is to build an inclusive conversation that appeals to many theories and methods within organizational theory and practice.
In keeping with the EGOS Colloquium 2021 theme, we are particularly interested in the temporal aspects that contribute to insights and understanding with a focus on organizing for an inclusive society. Studies across industries and markets are invited at micro- as well as macro-levels of analysis, but with a particular emphasis on the present. We invite diverse philosophical methods and concepts as well as methods of enquiry that permit the temporal nature of organizational processes and practices to be captured. Both conceptual and empirical contributions are welcome.
Papers may address, but are not limited to the following themes:
  • Situated time enactment through, for example, practices, routines and materiality, including how practices, routines or materiality in bringing together pasts and futures
  • Interplay between near and distant pasts and/or futures in the present: challenges of temporal sustainability
  • Dynamics of temporal structures; their emergence, endurance and change
  • How the temporal rhythms of emotions and aesthetics are played out through on-going activity
  • Dynamics, enactment and change of time horizons through situated activity
  • Philosophical/theoretical concepts for studying the temporal present and the interplay with pasts and futures
  • Methods and approaches for studying situated activity as it takes place through time
Please note:
  • The 37th EGOS Colloquium 2021 will take place Online.
  • Submission ends on Tuesday, January 12, 2021, 23:59:59 CET [Central European Time]
  • Your short paper should comprise 3,000 words (incl. references, all appendices and other material).
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Centre for Organizational Time would like to invite you to another thought-provoking webinar. We are excited that Daniel Geiger will give a talk on temporality and routine coordination. In particular, he will give us some novel insights on the enactment of time and the way temporal autonomy may be achieved.
Time and Date December 7th 2020 13.00– 15.00 CET
Format Webinar on Microsoft Teams. Presentation by Daniel Geiger followed by a joint discussion.
Registration Please email sls.ioa@cbs.dk to receive the Teams invitation link
We hope that you can join us!
This will be the last talk this year. We wish you all a wonderful winter season and are very much looking forward to continuing the discussion next year!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
We are more than happy to invite you to the next @bout time webinar hosted by the Centre for Organizational Time at Copenhagen Business School. We are delighted that Prof. Nicolas Bencherki will give us his insights on “It’s about time:” Observing The Weaving of Time in Strategizing Talk. More information on the talk you will find below.
Time and Date
November 26th 2020
14.00– 16.00 CET
Format
Webinar on Microsoft Teams.
Presentation by Nicolas Bencherki followed by a joint discussion.
Registration
Please email sls.ioa@cbs.dk to receive the Teams invitation link
We are looking forward to see you on the 26th of November!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The Centre of Organizational Time from the Copenhagen Business School regularly hosts seminars with renowned international scholars who give talks on different topics of time. Due to CO-VID 19, we have converted the @bout time seminars into online seminars – which gives you the opportunity to participate.
We are delighted to invite you to a thought-provoking webinar with Professor Jonatan Pinkse from the University of Manchester. More information on the talk you will find below.
Titel
Folding into temporary dyadic tensions: How organizational actors make sense of multiple interrelated tensions
Time and Date November 3rd 2020
13.00– 15.00 CET
Format
Webinar on Microsoft Teams. Presentation by Jonatan Pinkse followed by a joint discussion.
Registration
Please email sls.ioa@cbs.dk to receive the Teams invitation link
We hope you can join us!
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
This year the EGOS standing working group on Organization & Time organized the sub-theme Understanding the Past (and Future) in the Present convened by David Chandler, Majken Schultz, and Roy Suddaby.
Although taking place online, with the help of the highly engaged participants and the very thoroughly planned and executed organization of the sub-theme by the conveners and session chairs the sub-theme build an interesting series of inclusive conversations about different theories and methods addressing time and temporality in organization research. Thanks to everyone who made this track a success!
We are very much looking forward to continuing the discussions throughout the year at different events in person or online and are specifically looking forward to meeting you all at EGOS 2021 in Amsterdam.
 
Tor Hernes
added a research item
Although strategy and identity are recognized as exhibiting different temporalities, research has yet to show how their temporal differences influence their mutual interplay. Based on a longitudinal case study, we make three contributions to understanding how temporal differences influence the interplay between strategy and identity. First, we articulate their temporal differences as differences in temporal structures, defined as the ordering of their past and future time horizons and the temporal depth between those horizons. Second, we show how different combinations of temporal structures lead to different modes of interplay, which we label “punctuated,” “subsumed,” and “sustained.” Third, we show how sustained interplay happens when strategy includes multiple horizons and greater temporal depth, while identity has more defined horizons and a temporal depth spanning the distant past and future. In a sustained mode of interplay, strategy is meaningfully framed by identity, while strategy serves to enact identity. These findings, we argue, have major implications for how organizations can comply with short-term business cycles while addressing long-term concerns.
Brad Aeon
added an update
RESEARCH ARTICLES
1. How is time perspective related to burnout and job satisfaction? A conservation of resources perspective
A balanced temporal focus profile is associated with lower burnout and higher job satisfaction
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2. The Impact of Time‐Keeping Direction on Compensatory Consumption: The Role of Perceived Resource Deficiency
This one might be interesting for those who study time valuation: downward time-keeping (e.g., using a countdown timer) leads to perceived resource scarcity, which leads people to choose high-calorie foods. This is quite interesting as the direction of time-keeping influence our perception of scarcity in domains that have nothing to do with time (e.g., food consumption).
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IN THE MEDIA
1. Childcare service goes 24x7 as parents work for foreign markets
As parents work longer and more irregular hours, daycare services are adapting by offering round-the-clock opening hours. This might be interesting to scholars studying social time compression and/or the outsourced self.
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2. Mum puts children to bed wearing next day's clothes and says it 'works wonders'
In other, lighter news, a mother of two sends her kids to bed wearing next clothes for the next day to save time. Anecdotal but potentially reflective of an increasingly problematic sense of time pressure.
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That's all for this week. Enjoy your weekend!
Brad Aeon.
 
Brad Aeon
added an update
RESEARCH ARTICLES
1. Subjective Time in Organizations: Conceptual Clarification, Integration, and Implications for Future Research
Shi Tang, Andreas Richter, and the late Sucheta Nadkarni reviewed 29 temporal constructs (e.g., temporal focus, temporal depth) to clarify the concept of subjective time. The authors organize temporal constructs along two dimensions: trait/state and individual/collective. In the appendix you'll find a very useful list of temporal constructs with their definition and references.
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2. Pardon the interruption: An integrative review and future research agenda for research on work interruptions
For those interested in task-switching/attention residue (cf. Leroy, 2009), this paper reviews 247 studies to offer an integration of what we know and don't know about interruptions in the workplace.
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Thank you, and have yourself a great weekend!
Brad Aeon.
 
Brad Aeon
added an update
RESEARCH
1. Top management team time horizon blending and organizational ambidexterity
The average time horizon (or temporal depth) as well as the temporal diversity of a top management team influence organizational ambidexterity (i.e., ability to simultaneously exploit and explore opportunities). The relationship is moderated by CEO temporal leadership.
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2. Time use of millennials and nonmillennials
New findings from the American Time-Use Survey about millennials' time use patterns. In a nutshell: millennials work more, sleep more, and socialize more than previous generations.
That's all for this week. If you've come across new time-related papers please feel free to share.
Thank you and have yourself a great week,
Brad Aeon.
 
Brad Aeon
added an update
RESEARCH ARTICLES
Future Orientation as a Universal Feature of Wellbeing: Leveraging Big Data for Cross-cultural Research
Future focus is associated with health and well-being in samples living in stable, developed countries. But what about the rest of the world? This study uses big data to show that the link between future focus and beneficial outcomes seems to be relatively universal.
Your everyday life up for sale: How time-saving services undermine intrinsic motivation
Really interesting new PhD thesis by U of Texas graduate Haesung Jung on how time-saving devices and services (e.g., online grocery shopping) are convenient but ultimately reduce the enjoyment of activities as well as their perceived value.
A shorter working week for everyone: How much paid work is needed for mental health and well-being?
Time spent at work is said to be necessary for mental health and well-being (cf. studies on how work offers a certain time structure that helps people, and when that structure vanishes because of unemployment, people get depressed). This new study quantitatively assesses how many hours of work are necessary for people to enjoy well-being. 8 hours a week are more than sufficient. The wellbeing of employees is similar regardless of the length of the working week up to 48.
The Impact of Consumers’ Time Constraint and Conspicuous Consumption Behavior on the Throwaway Society
We're all pressed for time and strive to be more productive. This empirical study shows that time constraints partly explain why people contribute to the "throwaway society" by favoring disposal over reuse.
IN THE MEDIA
For those interested in employer-enforced productivity techniques/workplace surveillance, two news items:
  • THE GUARDIAN: The Domino’s ‘pizza checker’ is just the beginning – workplace surveillance is coming for you
  • WIRED: At an Outback Steakhouse Franchise, Surveillance Blooms
That's it for now, have a great week!
 
Brad Aeon
added an update
RESEARCH ARTICLES
  • A new model of work-life balance based on the idea that people actively strive to restore perceive imbalances between work, life, and personal domains
  • For those interested in Sahlin's original affluent society theory, i.e., that hunter gatherers had more leisure time than modern, agriculturalist human beings. This paper adds empirical evidence to the theory. Note, also, that women's work time does not seem to change from one society structure to another (they do unpaid work no matter what) while men work less in hunter-gatherer societies.
  • Very nice paper on how thinking about work while not working influences well-being. Interestingly, not thinking at all about work while not working is not as strongly associated with well-being as thinking positively about work while not working.
  • Time pressure at work can contribute to your sense of achievement, but not when that time pressure is related to tasks deemed unnecessary (i.e., hindrances).
  • Further counterintuitive evidence that time pressure makes people act in prosocial ways (the underlying mechanism is the desire to present oneself favorably).
That's all for this week. I'm trying to get out of Santiago, Chile, alive despite the rising violence and political unrest. (There's a state of emergency currently enforced and all planes are grounded.) Once back in Montreal I'll be able to work on the format of this weekly roundup.
Thank you and have a great week,
Brad Aeon.
 
Brad Aeon
added an update
RESEARCH ARTICLES
  • A new time-use study on how people allocated their time during the Great Recession. Findings suggest that non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. used their time differently compared to ethnic minorities.
  • Reviews the multiple factors, on multiple levels, that affect quality of sleep. Overall, disadvantaged statuses and poor social environment predict unhealthy sleep duration and poor sleep quality.
ON THE MEDIA
New York Times: How to Succeed When You’re Marginalized or Discriminated Against at Work.
Great piece on productivity/time management and social inclusion/oppression
QSR Magazine: Fast-Food Drive Thrus Got 20 Seconds Slower in 2019
For those who study issues of social acceleration (e.g., Rosa; Wajcman), drive-thrus are a great example of how our obsession with efficiency has become commonplace.
FUN FACTS
Esquire: Watchmaking company Timex releases "Time Is Money" watch.
Could be an interesting illustration/piece of trivia for those who do research on the time-is-money mindset.
Have a great week,
Brad Aeon.
 
Brad Aeon
added an update
Hi everyone,
I talked to a moderator of this project who kindly accepted my offer to post weekly time-related research news. These weekly roundups will provide time-oriented researchers with a quick overview of cutting-edge insights in management and other fields, including marketing, sociology, psychology, gender studies, anthropology, neuroscience, history, demographics, and economics. I believe that a weekly frequency can provide timely updates without overwhelming you with constant notifications. Hope you'll like it.
So without further ado, here's the first Research Weekly News:
  • Results: The findings of this study demonstrate that occupational exposure to physical, verbal or sexual violence is associated with sleep problems.
  • Interesting for those researching time, money, leisure (and the productivity of leisure through increasing money invested in leisure). Results: Given the observed increase in leisure expenditures relative to leisure time and the complementarity of these inputs in leisure technology, we infer a significant increase in the average productivity of time spent on leisure.
  • Interesting for those investigating biological time. Title is pretty self-explanatory.
  • Super interesting study on how donating time is seen as morally superior to donating money.
  • New study by Ashley Whillans and colleagues on the well-being outcomes of valuing time over money.
  • Future focus facilitates creativity
  • Not extremely new (published in mid-August) but potentially valuable for those studying time from a strategic management perspective. It's on how organizational structure affects the time it takes employees to adjust to organizational restructuring
  • A review piece by Susan Mohammed and Jacqueline Marhefka on measurement of time perspective.
Apologies for the layout, I still have to learn how to make the format more visually appealing.
Have a great week,
Brad Aeon.
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
Dear all,
Exiting news: The details of all sub-themes of the EGOS Colloquium 2020 are out. Submission period: September 16, 2019 until January 14, 2020. The [SWG] Organization & Time will focus 2020 on Understanding the Past (and Future) in the Present.
Convenors:
David Chandler
University of Colorado Denver, USA
Majken Schultz
Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Roy Suddaby
University of Victoria, Canada, & University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
Contemporary organizations operate increasingly according to a logic of speed and instantaneity, while at the same time increasing their temporal spans to either draw upon their histories or to cope with distant future challenges (Schultz & Hernes, 2013). Within widely varying “temporal depths” (Bluedorn, 2002), different organizational actors carve out wide combinations of temporal structures (Ancona et al., 2001) and trajectories (Lawrence et al., 2001) that shape the organizations themselves and their relationships with other organizational actors. Recent work in organization theory has begun the search for ways to analytically and empirically handle the temporal complexity that organizational actors face (Hussenot & Missonier, 2016). This sub-theme aims to extend this work through joint inquiry.
Within organization theory, many of the actions and outcomes we study are the result of processes that occur over long periods of time (Bluedorn & Denhardt, 1988; Goodman et al., 2001; Lee & Liebenau, 1999). These processes reach into the distant past, but also stretch into the unknown future. In spite of this, within much macro-level research, temporal issues are rarely theorized rigorously. As such, we seek to host a discussion among colleagues from across the range of organization theories to (a) more comprehensively theorize the past, present, and future in relation to organizations and organizing, and (b) stimulate work on theories of time itself (Pierson, 2004). This discussion, we believe, will have profound implications for our understanding of organizations and how they evolve. In particular, this sub-theme builds on the first sub-theme of the SWG (in 2019) to focus on the various ways the past are used in organizations and enacted in the present. We also include topics related to how expectations for the future intersect with uses of the past. Organizations draw upon their own past across widely different timespans, which may extend from a few days to centuries; they also draw upon past practices and symbols from craft, traditions, regions, or myths (e.g., Dacin et al., 2018; Schultz & Hernes, 2013).
Our goal for this sub-theme, therefore, is twofold – to more comprehensively theorize the past, present, and future in relation to organizations and organizing (e.g., fostering more complete analyses of complex temporal processes), but also to stimulate theory about the past, present, and future in a phenomenological sense. We seek to build an inclusive conversation that appeals to many theories and methods within organization theory. For example, we are not simply interested in understanding long periods of time as path-dependent processes, but in understanding things like temporal trajectories, time as a social construct, the past as a resource in the present, and the cumulative evolution of institutions and their underlying values.
The resulting discussion presents the opportunity for an exciting avenue of research that includes, but is not limited, to the following:
  • To explore the effects of “ancestry” and “legacy” on the founding, evolution, and dissolution of descendent organizations (Walsh & Bartunek, 2011).
  • To understand the role of rhetoric in constructing history that serves as a source of competitive advantage for organizations (Suddaby et al., 2010).
  • To focus on the nature of the distant past, exploring how organizations draw on historical artifacts and narratives to build authenticity and shape identity (Hatch & Schultz, 2017).
  • To understand how organizations and other social actors use history strategically to foster identification with key stakeholders (Suddaby et al., 2015).
  • To study character and values as historically-accreted commitments that create meaning for individuals within institutional contexts (Chandler, 2014; Kraatz & Flores, 2015).
  • To conceptualize how distant pasts and distant futures connect, in the present (Chandler & Foster, 2015; Schultz & Hernes, forthcoming). Distant pasts can be evoked in the present, but in a processual or pragmatist view any evoking of the past has a future orientation.
In this spirit, researchers across the range of organization theories are encouraged to apply for this sub-theme to help place the past, present, and future on a firmer theoretical footing. Our goal is to foster discussions that encompass theory (e.g., path dependence, sedimentation) and methodology (e.g., qualitative analysis, rhetorical analysis) to enable the more effective theorization and empirical study of the essential role of the past, present, and future in understanding organizations and organizing processes.
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
One month later, we are still full of good EGOS impressions. How about you? A big thank you to all participants!
The EGOS standing working group on Organization & Time (2019-2022) started this year with the sub-theme on Organizing in the Nexus between Short and Distant Futures convened by Tima Bansal, Tor Hernes, and Joanna Karmowska.
In line with the EGOS main theme on ‘Enlightening the Future’ Tor started the three days of collective, vivid, and open discussions on the role of time in organizing with an inspiring talk on the short and the extremely distant futures, we are dealing with in regards to for example nuclear security.
Two papers reviewing the literature on certain perspectives on time and temporality followed the introductory talk. While one paper argued for addressing and examining temporal tensions, the other discussed methodological challenges in researching organizational temporality The papers set a basis for the follow-up discussions in the sub-theme.
The papers in the following parallel streams focused on temporality in sustainable development – in NGO partnerships, in the finance sector and in design foresight activities – and on temporal work and organizational performance in regards to genetics networks, organizational learning, and entrepreneurial growth.
The next day started as well with parallel streams whereby within the first stream papers talked about different temporalities and how to conceptualize them (i.e. referring to Luhmann’s system theory) and how to empirically research it in grants and universities and in nuclear security. The second stream focused on organizational values and identity.
Within the next two parallel streams papers addressed speed and pacing in routine dynamics and sustainability challenges as well as introduced different theoretical approaches from practice theory and process philosophy in the research context of education and career.
The day ended with a lively plenary session discussing new approaches towards temporality such as the concept of situated temporality, the value of worktime in organizational change, and boredom as a facilitator of organizational transformation.
The last day of the conference included papers discussing organizational narratives as an agent of change as well as tensions in sensemaking introducing a Shakesperian view on sensemaking, accounting for a justifying perspective, and in sensemaking and strategy making in the context of poverty alleviation.
The closing session reflected on the past discussions within the sub-theme and at the same time building future avenues with the help of three papers focusing on temporality in institutions and organizations.
The sub-theme intended to provide the opportunity for organizational scholars to appreciate the temporal qualities of their research phenomena and to position their work within the broader studies on time and organizations. With a variety of papers using different approaches to studying organization and time, discussions were stimulated helping us in identifying and building more comprehensive theoretical frameworks on the subject – across industries and markets, micro- as well as macro-levels of analysis, philosophical methods and concepts as well as methods of inquiry that permit the temporal nature of organizational processes and practices to be captured.
We are looking forward to continue the discussions throughout the year at different events and/or online and are specifically looking forward to see you all at EGOS 2020 in Hamburg, where we will focus on Organization and Time: Understanding the Past (and Future) in the Present.
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
The PDW on ‘The Challenges of Writing about Emergence and Temporality in Empirical Studies of Time and Process’ at EGOS 2019 convened by Tima Bansal, Kätlin Pulk, Line Revsbæk and Viviane Sergi and facilitated by Barbara Simpson, Tor Hernes and Anthony Hussenot was intended to start a discussion on the multiple challenges of writing about and presenting studies influenced by process thinking and dealing with issues of temporality. For the first time the Standing Working Groups of ‘Doing Process Research’ and ‘Organization and Time’ met recognizing the strong synergies between these two research interests. Together we explored the questions in regards to how we present time, temporality, emergence, transformation and relationality in research accounts, creatively writing, and writing from a within perspective. The PDW was, thereby, split in three parts that can be captioned as expert talk on process and temporality studies, reflecting on our experiences, and drawing on inspirational material. We had some inspiring conversations in all three parts – nice work was being done there – that we would like to share with you:
1. Expert talk on process and temporality studies
Tor Hernes and Barbara Simpson gave us an overview on how they define process (differentiating between studying processes and process as ontology), the different authors they draw on (e.g. Mead, Whitehead) and their differences, why this perspective is of interest in organization studies by referring i.a. to Karl Weick’s work, and shared with us insights associated with presenting empirical studies researching process and temporality.
2. Reflecting on our own experiences
The challenges that we face when writing about process and temporality were diverse and depended on the study, research question, but also the background of the workshop participants. In sum, the different challenges referred to the vocabulary, the structure of the text, the balance between abstract and detailed writing, the visualizing of the findings, and the processual and temporal nature of the studied phenomena.
3. Drawing on inspirational material
The inspirational material that workshop participants brought to the workshop was as diverse as the participants were. Whereas some participants showed us texts about creative writing, others brought text examples of writing differently. Many of the participants have found their inspirations in the art world cultural objects such as drawings, paintings, installations, tapestries, montages, movies or fictional literature. Furthermore, it has been discussed that writing differently comes also with reading differently or reading different texts; writing is not an isolated practice. This makes texts as the following inspirational in developing the habit of writing differently (or even emerging methodology differently):
  • Spivak, G. C. (2014). Readings. Seagull Books.
  • Jackson, A. Y., & Mazzei, L. A. (2017). Thinking with theory: A new analytic for qualitative inquiry. The Sage handbook of qualitative research, 717-727. / Jackson, A. Y., & Mazzei, L. (2011). Thinking with theory in qualitative research: Viewing data across multiple perspectives. Routledge.
  • Joas, H. (1996). The creativity of action. University of Chicago Press.
Other inspirations were:
Writing differently: écriture feminine (e.g. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1350507618811027), Annemarie Mol’s book The Body Multiple: ontology in medical practice
Books and authors: “Invisible Citites” (Italo Calvino), Virginia Woolf, Marcel Proust
Installation: Richard Serra’s ’The matter of time’ in the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao (https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/21794)
Tapestries: The Queen’s Tapestries at Christiansborg Palace (different frames and symbols)
Static images of a dynamic process: tapestry (little stitches adding up to running water); metamorphosis drawing; picture of a conveyor belt (static image of a dynamic process); Jason Shulman photographs: films condensed into a single frame
Further inspirational material can be found in the enclosed presentation. And please feel free to add your inspirational material in the comments.
These are just a few impressions of the PDW. We are curious in how these discussions and sharing of inspirational material will result in texts written differently and maybe breaking the rules.
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
Dear all,
Please find enclosed the CFP to the 3rd International AGORAS Conference Governing risks beyond the “here and now”. It will be held from 23rd to 25th October 2019 at Cité des Congrès in Nantes (France) and will close the eponymous research project.
This event is intended above all to be a forum for exchange and dialogue between actors from the academic, industrial, institutional and political worlds, with different disciplines and affiliations, who are interested in risk governance, not limited to nuclear risks. This conference aims at discussing risk governance processes and practices in the light of two key notions: boundaries and temporalities.
Confirmed Keynote Speakers
Sonja Schmid, Virgina Tech, USA
Brian Wynne, Lancaster Univerity, UK
Online Registration
Conference entry is free for all (limited number of places available)
 
Miriam Feuls
added an update
Dear all,
We are looking forward to meeting you at the EGOS Colloquium in Edinburgh this summer.
1½ weeks to go until the deadline for the PDW submissions. If you are thinking about taking part in a PDW, we highly recommend the following one:
PDW 01: The Challenges of Writing about Emergence and Temporality in Empirical Studies of Time and Process.
Convenors: Tima Bansal, Ivey Business School, Western University, Canada Kätlin Pulk, Estonian Business School, Estonia Line Revsbæk, Aalborg University, Denmark Viviane Sergi, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Canada
Facilitators: Tor Hernes, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark Anthony Hussenot, Université Côte d’Azur, France Barbara Simpson, University of Strathclyde, United Kingdom
The purpose of this Pre-Colloquium Development Workshop (PDW) is to discuss the multiple challenges of writing about and presenting studies influenced by process thinking and dealing with issues of temporality. It is offered as a joint venture between the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) 01 on ‘Doing Process Research’ and SWG 10 on ‘Time and Temporality’, recognizing the strong synergies between these two groups.
This PDW is mainly designed to help PhD students and early career researchers, although it will not be closed to more experienced scholars. Based on feedback collected after previous workshops, we realize that researchers often struggle with writing up their studies and with presenting their data in a convincing way, and may feel isolated in their struggle. Our workshop aims to frankly discuss these issues, and to develop a sense of community amongst early career researchers who share an interest in studying temporality and process.
Format: Generally speaking, the PDW will alternate between exercises and discussions in small groups and collective reflection. Prior to the workshop, the participants will receive a few instructions on how to prepare for the workshop.
Application: Please submit – via the EGOS website – by April 2, 2019 a single document of application (.doc, .docx or .pdf file) that includes the following information: A short letter explaining why you would like to participate in this PDW and describing briefly the empirical work you are currently pursuing (1 full page maximum) A short text (3 full pages maximum) presenting a short excerpt of a current presentation of empirical material from a process study or study of time, in which you identify and reflect on the challenges you are currently facing in terms of the writing and presentation of process and time
In addition, participants are asked to bring an inspirational text, example, a visual or an artifact that guides them or serves as inspiration in their efforts to develop ways of presenting process and time. – We will accept a maximum of 30 people.
 
Miriam Feuls
added a project goal
The Time Research Community was born out of the burgeoning interest in researching time and temporality in organizations. We aim to establish and maintain a platform for exchange, discussion, and development on time and organization by bringing together scholars from several areas of research and teaching, including organization studies, entrepreneurship, innovation studies, business history, strategy, management and leadership and technology studies. We would like to encourage novel and exciting studies of the role of time, moving beyond the current reification of “clock time” to understanding time and temporality as key to understanding how emergence, continuity and change of any organizational actors or form takes place in the flow of time.
In particular, we will encourage activities being developed, such as:
- Paper presentations and track organizing at prestigious academic conferences,
- Seminar series and workshops,
- Reading groups, and
- Networking.