Project

The characterisation and utilisation of an equine model of joint inflammation in order to investigate the utility of novel nano therapeutics.

Goal: Aim 1: Characterisation of inflammatory gene expression profile, biochemical, lipidomic and proteomic parameters in an equine model of joint inflammation.

Aim 2: Investigating the utility of novel nanoparticle based therapeutics in an equine model of joint inflammation.

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Project log

David J Brayden
added a research item
Polyelectrolyte nanoparticle constructs (NPs) comprising salmon calcitonin (sCT), chitosan (CS), and hyaluronic acid (HA) were previously established as having anti-inflammatory potential when injected via the intra-articular (i.a.) route to a mouse model. We attempted to translate the formulation to a large animal model, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated equine model of joint inflammation. The aim was to manufacture under aseptic conditions to produce sterile pyrogen-free NPs, to confirm physicochemical characteristics, and to test toxicity and efficacy in a pilot study. NP dispersions were successfully formulated using pharmaceutical-grade source materials and were aseptically manufactured under GMP-simulated conditions in a grade A modular aseptic processing workstation. The NP formulation had no detectable pathogen or endotoxin contamination. NPs were then tested versus a lactated Ringer's solution control following single i.a. injections to the radiocarpal joints of two groups of four horses pre-treated with LPS, followed by arthrocentesis at set intervals over 1 week. There was no evidence of treatment-related toxicity over the period. While there were no differences between clinical read-outs of the NP and the control, two synovial fluid-derived biomarkers associated with cartilage turnover revealed a beneficial effect of NPs. In conclusion, NPs comprising well-known materials were manufactured for an equine i.a.-injectable pilot study and yielded no NP-attributable toxicity. Evidence of NP-associated benefit at the level of secondary endpoints was detected as a result of decreases in synovial fluid inflammatory biomarkers.
David J Brayden
added a research item
For inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment, local delivery of molecules loaded in nanoparticles to the inflamed colon could be a promising strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate how drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles target the site of inflammation and to analyse the influence of different colon-specific delivery strategies. Three different polymeric nanoparticles were formulated using ovalbumin (OVA) as a model drug. pH-sensitive nanoparticles were made with Eudragit(®) S100. Mucoadhesive nanoparticles were created with trimethylchitosan (TMC). A mix of polymers, PLGA, PEG-PLGA and PEG-PCL, were used to obtain a sustained drug delivery. Furthermore, ligands targeting immune cells (i.e. mannose) or the inflamed colon (i.e. a specific peptide) were grafted on the PEG chain of PCL. Interaction of nanoparticles with the intestinal epithelium was explored using Caco-2 monolayers designed to mimic an inflamed epithelium and then visualized using confocal laser microscopy. TMC nanoparticles had the highest apparent permeability for OVA in the untreated model. However, in the inflamed model, there were no difference between TMC, PLGA-based and Eudragit(®) nanoparticles. The uptake of nanoparticles in the inflamed mouse colon was assessed in a horizontal diffusion chamber. Mannose-grafted PLGA nanoparticles showed the highest accumulation of OVA in inflamed colon. Based on these results, active targeting of macrophages and dendritic cells may be a promising approach for targeting the colon in IBD.
David J Brayden
added 2 research items
Prolonged inappropriate inflammatory responses contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to aspects of osteoarthritis (OA). The orphan nuclear receptor, NR4A2, is a key regulator and potential biomarker for inflammation and represents a potentially valuable therapeutic target. Both salmon calcitonin (sCT) and hyaluronic acid (HA) attenuated activated mRNA expression of NR4A1, NR4A2, NR4A3, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 1, 3 and 13 in three human cell lines: SW1353 chondrocytes, U937 and THP-1 monocytes. Ad-mixtures of sCT and HA further down-regulated expression of NR4A2 compared to either agent alone at specific concentrations, hence the rationale for their formulation in nanocomplexes (NP) using chitosan. The sCT released from NP stimulated cAMP production in human T47D breast cancer cells expressing sCT receptors. When NP were injected by the intra-articular (I.A.) route to the mouse knee during on-going inflammatory arthritis of the K/BxN serum transfer model, joint inflammation was reduced together with NR4A2 expression, and local bone architecture was preserved. These data highlight remarkable anti-inflammatory effects of sCT and HA at the level of reducing NR4A2 mRNA expression in vitro. Combining them in NP elicits anti-arthritic effects in vivo following I. A. delivery.
Calcitonin is used as a second line treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, but widespread acceptance is somewhat limited by subcutaneous and intranasal routes of delivery. This study attempted to enable intestinal sCT absorption in rats using the mild surfactant, tetradecyl maltoside (TDM) as an intestinal permeation enhancer. Human Caco-2 and HT29-MTX-E12 mucus-covered intestinal epithelial monolayers were used for permeation studies. Rat in situ intestinal instillation studies were conducted to evaluate the absorption of sCT with and without 0.1% w/v TDM in jejunum, ileum and colon. TDM significantly enhanced sCT permeation across intestinal epithelial monolayers, most likely due to combined paracellular and transcellular actions. In situ, TDM caused an increased absolute bioavailability of sCT in rat colon from 1.0% to 4.6%, whereas no enhancement increase was observed in ileal and jejunal instillations. Histological analysis suggested mild perturbation of colonic epithelia in segments instilled with sCT and TDM. These data suggest that the membrane composition of the colon is different to the small intestine and that it is more amenable to permeation enhancement. Thus, formulations designed to release payload in the colon could be advantageous for systemic delivery of poorly permeable molecules.
David J Brayden
added 2 research items
Delivery of biologically active agents to animals is often perceived to be the poor relation of human drug delivery. Yet this field has a long and successful history of species-specific device and formulation development, ranging from simple approaches and devices used in production animals to more sophisticated formulations and approaches for a wide range of species. While several technologies using biodegradable polymers have been successfully marketed in a range of veterinary and human products, the transfer of delivery technologies has not been similarly applied across species. This may be due to a combination of specific technical requirements for use of devices in different species, inter-species pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and physiological differences, and distinct market drivers for drug classes used in companion and food-producing animals. This chapter reviews selected commercialised and research-based parenteral and non-parenteral veterinary drug delivery technologies in selected domestic species. Emphasis is also placed on the impact of endogenous drug transporters on drug distribution characteristics in different species. In vitro models used to investigate carrier-dependent transport are reviewed. Species-specific expression of transporters in several tissues can account for inter-animal or inter-species pharmacokinetic variability, lack of predictability of drug efficacy, and potential drug-drug interactions.
Fluxes of the anti-parasitic agents, [(3)H]-ivermectin, [(3)H]-selamectin and [(3)H]-moxidectin were studied across non-transfected and transfected canine kidney epithelial monolayers, MDCK II/wt, MDCK II-MDR1, MDCK II-MRP1 and MDCK II-MRP2. All four lines surprisingly expressed significant levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), coded for by MDR1, but MDCK II-MDR1 expressed increased levels compared to the other lines. MDCK II-MRP1 and MDCK II-MRP2 expressed increased levels of MRP1 and MRP2 respectively. Fluxes of [(3)H]-ivermectin, [(3)H]-selamectin, [(3)H]-moxidectin, and the P-gp substrates, rhodamine-123 and DiOC(2), were polarized in the basolateral-to-apical (secretory) direction across the four lines. Selected MRP inhibitors used in relevant pharmacological concentrations did not block the secretory fluxes of either [(3)H]-ivermectin or [(3)H]-selamectin in either the non-transfected or MRP-transfected lines. In contrast, secretory fluxes of ivermectin and selamectin were inhibited in all four lines by the P-gp inhibitor, verapamil. These data confirm that ivermectin and selamectin are substrates for P-gp in four additional cell lines, but suggest that they are not significant substrates for MRP1 or MRP2 where there is background expression of P-gp. Since this pattern of expression also pertains on the blood-brain barrier, it is unlikely that MRP1 and MRP2 play a significant role in ivermectin and selamectin blood: brain distribution in vivo.
Hugh Giffney
added a project goal
Aim 1: Characterisation of inflammatory gene expression profile, biochemical, lipidomic and proteomic parameters in an equine model of joint inflammation.
Aim 2: Investigating the utility of novel nanoparticle based therapeutics in an equine model of joint inflammation.