Project

The War In Ukraine

Goal: We are pleased to introduce a new initiative by the Ghent Insitute for International and European Studies (GIES): the GIES Occasional Papers.

Taken aback at the shocking acts of aggression by the Russian authorities in Ukraine, our research group aimed to look inwards and build on our expertise to shine a light on the crisis. Starting today, we will publish contributions by our researchers on a daily basis.

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144

Project log

Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
In the last contribution to our Occasional Paper series, our Huanyu Zhao and Jing Yu map the official Chinese position towards Russia's war against Ukraine.
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
This contribution by Mattias Vermeiren analyses the freezing of Russia's Central Bank reserves: the cause of the collapse of the ruble and of increasing global financial fragmentation, or much ado about nothing?
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
While history never repeats itself completely, is it possible to draw some parallels between Germany's treatment after World War I and Russia after the Cold War? In this contribution, Goedele De Keersmaeker argues that not taking an old enemy seriously - either as a partner in a post-war settlement or later as a re-emerged threat - can undermine security.
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
In this contribution, Dries Lesage, Emin Daskin and Hasan Yar look at both historical antecedents and societal dimension to explain Turkey's reaction to Russia’s 2022 aggression against Ukraine.
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
Karolina Kluczewska was doing field research in Tajikistan when Russia attacked Ukraine. In a country where people usually are not concerned about world affairs, the war suddenly became a frequent topic of discussion, and a major preoccupation of many people whose livelihoods depend on Russia. This post-Soviet Central Asian country is tied to Russia in many ways: historically, politically and, most importantly, economically. In this paper Karolina sketches how the first weeks of the war in Ukraine affected Tajikistan.
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
“We feel like a part of Europe, but may look like a part of Russia. With our thoughts, we are in the West. With our sins, we are in the East”. In the fourth contribution to our paper, Louise Amoris breaks down the perceptions and self-perception of Ukraine and Ukrainian identity.
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
The 3rd paper in our Paper series argues how Moscow & Beijing actually contribute to the creation of a multipolar world. Sven Biscop, Bart Dessein & Jasper Roctus write that great powers should compartmentalize relations based on self-interest.
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
It is still said here and there, even in academic circles: we must understand the Russian president. This contribution by Hendrik Vos and Klaas Wauters looks at Putin, the history of the Soviet Union and the strength of the European Project.
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added an update
In our first contribution, Ferdi De Ville explains how the war in Ukraine may entail "The End of Globalisation as We Know It". Https://www.ugent.be/ps/politiekewetenschappen/gies/en/gies_papers/2022-ukraine/the-end-of-globalisation-as-we-know-it
 
Tim Haesebrouck
added a project goal
We are pleased to introduce a new initiative by the Ghent Insitute for International and European Studies (GIES): the GIES Occasional Papers.
Taken aback at the shocking acts of aggression by the Russian authorities in Ukraine, our research group aimed to look inwards and build on our expertise to shine a light on the crisis. Starting today, we will publish contributions by our researchers on a daily basis.