Archived project

The Literary Universals Project (http://literary-universals.uconn.edu)

Goal: This is a site to foster interaction and collaboration on the study of cross-cultural patterns in literature and orature. The patterns range from story genres to narrational techniques, emplotment to prosody. The site encourages the development, exploration, and refinement of hypotheses about what literary universals there are and how they might be explained--whether through biology, group dynamics, contingent features of development that recur cross-culturally, aspects of human-environment interaction, or other factors. Visitors to the site are welcome to send suggestions or to submit articles to be refereed for publication on the site.

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Project log

Patrick Hogan
added a research item
https://literary-universals.uconn.edu/2018/06/22/impossible-love-a-sub-genre-of-romantic-stories/
Patrick Hogan
added 6 research items
“This marvelous book reconnects the study of literature to the themes that have made it eternally fascinating, and connects it for the first time to the sciences of mind and brain. It is a landmark in modern intellectual life, heralding an exciting new integration of the sciences and humanities.” Steven Pinker, Johnstone Professor of Psychology, Harvard University “With painstaking scholarship and subtle theorizing, Patrick Colm Hogan marshals a compelling case for the transcultural reach of narrative forms. He shows in rich detail how plot structures recurring across world literature express emotional universals. The Mind and Its Stories is stimulating on several levels. It contributes a nuanced conception of universals to the philosophical debate. It offers cognitive scientists a remarkable occasion for rethinking the relation of emotion to culture and to human nature. And by providing enormously wide-ranging evidence for narrative universals, Hogan may touch off nothing short of a revolution in literary studies.” David Bordwell, Jacques Ledoux Professor of Film Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison “The Mind and Its Stories is in the forefront of the scientific study of literature as a product of the capacities of the human mind. Patrick Colm Hogan shows how human cognitive processes of story lie at the center of both cognitive science and the study of verbal art.” Mark Turner, Distinguished University Professor, The University of Maryland, and Associate Director, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences
"From his groundbreaking work on how the mind's stories resonate with themes that occur all around the world, Patrick Hogan takes on the question of how minds make stories. His answer is that it is by the same sort of imagination that we humans use to know each other. Hogan ranges cogently through examples from William Shakespeare's Hamlet and Jane Austen's Emma to Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis. He ends with an afterword, inspired by Italo Calvino, of a kind you won't find in any other academic book. Marvelous.” Keith Oatley, University of Toronto "Patrick Hogan's provocative discussion of the role of simulation in literary composition demystifies literary narration by relating it to familiar mechanisms of reasoning and simulation. More important, he makes explicit cognitivist attempts at explanation so that we can try to evaluate how far cognitive approaches to narrative just provide an alternative vocabulary, and how far they offer additional explanatory power. As Hogan models the processes that underlie the creation of literary works, he outlines a valuable program for poetics." Jonathan Culler, Cornell University
http://literary-universals.uconn.edu/2017/02/06/comments-on-zheng-ying-chinese-and-western-drama-tragi-comedy-and-tragedy/
Patrick Hogan
added a project goal
This is a site to foster interaction and collaboration on the study of cross-cultural patterns in literature and orature. The patterns range from story genres to narrational techniques, emplotment to prosody. The site encourages the development, exploration, and refinement of hypotheses about what literary universals there are and how they might be explained--whether through biology, group dynamics, contingent features of development that recur cross-culturally, aspects of human-environment interaction, or other factors. Visitors to the site are welcome to send suggestions or to submit articles to be refereed for publication on the site.