Project

The Emotional Rollercoaster of Language Teaching

Goal: At any time, language teaching can be quite an emotional experience. I'm honoured to have a chapter in the book by this title and I hope that it might be particularly useful during this difficult time as teachers adapt to instructing online.

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Simon Humphries
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This is the link:
This was my first invited interview on a podcast. I really enjoyed talking about my chapter in the forthcoming book "The Emotional Rollercoaster of Language Teaching" (edited by Christina Gkonou, Jean-Marc Dewaele, and Jim King).
 
Simon Humphries
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Please see the attached flyer for details.
 
Simon Humphries
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This final version of this book chapter will be published 31 May 2020 by Multilingual Matters (In "The Emotional Rollercoaster of Language Teaching". Edited by: Christina Gkonou, Jean-Marc Dewaele, Jim King) http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?K=9781788928359 Introduction: Despite the messiness that is often involved in fieldwork (Naveed et al., 2017), published studies tend to contain data that can be categorised and generalised. The unusable data remain unreported. However, we can learn a great deal from when things go wrong. Focusing on interviewing, Prior (2016: 156) says ‘I hope that we fail more often and that we fail in unexpected ways’. He notes that researchers can learn from challenging situations and calls for greater reflexivity into the emotional work that goes into research and the interactions between researcher and participants. This chapter returns to an earlier study (Humphries, 2014; Humphries & Burns, 2015), where four male Japanese teachers of English (JTEs) struggled to use communicative language teaching (CLT) textbooks in an engineering college. Data from one teacher seemed largely unusable, due to his unpredictable behaviour during interviews and classroom observations. It was difficult to categorise and compare him with other JTEs using the constant comparison framework (Corbin & Strauss, 2008) that underlay the original study. Moreover, my presence in the classroom appeared to provoke some disruption and my interview questions may have stimulated some anxiety for him. In turn, this caused stress for me and I frequently considered halting his part of the study to avoid causing him emotional strain. Therefore, this chapter re-analyses this intrinsic case (Stake, 1995) from a post-hoc self-reflexive emotional labour perspective. In other words, readers of this Emotional Rollercoaster volume can see how the process of data collection has emotional consequences for both the participant and the researcher.
Simon Humphries
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At any time, language teaching can be quite an emotional experience. I'm honoured to have a chapter in the book by this title and I hope that it might be particularly useful during this difficult time as teachers adapt to instructing online.