Project

The Australian Temperament Project

Goal: Commencing in 1983, the Australian Temperament Project (ATP) is an ongoing longitudinal study that has followed the development of a large group of Victorian children from infancy to adulthood, and is now following their children. With detailed information collected from 16 waves of data collection, the ATP is one of the longest running studies of its kind in Australia, and one of only a few in the world with information on three generations of family members (i.e., the young people, their parents, and now the young people's children).

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Project log

Suzanne Vassallo
added 2 research items
This study identified factors that protected (a) adolescent bullies from becoming antisocial young adults, and (b) adolescent victims of bullying from subsequent depression. Data were drawn from the Australian Temperament Project, a population birth cohort study that has followed participants since 1983. Systematic examination of potential risk modifiers (protective factors) was conducted within a regression framework. Low negative reactivity was found to protect bullies from later antisocial outcomes and higher parental monitoring moderated (ameliorated) the risk relation between bullying and antisocial behavior. High social skills and understanding schoolwork protected victims from later depression, but high attachment to peers intensified the risk relation between victimization and later depression. Preventive interventions targeting interpersonal skills and parent and peer relationships may be effective in reducing adverse outcomes of bullying.
Suzanne Vassallo
added 2 research items
This study examined the stability of risky driving behaviour from late adolescence to early adulthood among 823 young Australian drivers participating in an ongoing longitudinal study. This issue was explored by examining the stability of risky driving between the ages of 19-20 and 23-24 years (1) across the cohort and (2) among individuals. Focusing on cohort-wide trends, a modest reduction in the occurrence of speeding was observed across the sample between 19-20 and 23-24 years. However, drink-driving increased markedly over this period, and driving without a seatbelt or helmet for part of a trip also rose. Rates of other risky driving behaviours remained relatively unchanged. With regard to trends among individuals, while a decrease was evident in the risky driving propensities of many who had been classified as moderate or high risky drivers at age 19-20, 48% of the former group, and 77% of the latter group, still exhibited risky driving tendencies at 23-24 years. Together, these findings suggest a fair degree of stability in risky driving from late adolescence to early adulthood among this sample of Australian youth, highlighting the continuing need for road safety initiatives targeting young drivers beyond their first years of licensure.
In 2013, the Australian Temperament Project (ATP) longitudinal study celebrated its 30th anniversary. This article provides a brief overview of the ATP, and highlights some key findings that have emerged over the past three decades. From amongst the many research areas explored in the ATP, topics covered here include temperament, learning problems, mental health, risk-taking, bullying, positive development, and relationships with parents in adulthood. Future plans for the study are also presented, including the new ATP Generation 3 Study which commenced in 2011 - a unique longitudinal study of the children of the ATP participants.
Suzanne Vassallo
added an update
The attached article provides an overview of the Australian Temperament Project (ATP) and some key learnings from the first 30 years of the study
 
Suzanne Vassallo
added a project goal
Commencing in 1983, the Australian Temperament Project (ATP) is an ongoing longitudinal study that has followed the development of a large group of Victorian children from infancy to adulthood, and is now following their children. With detailed information collected from 16 waves of data collection, the ATP is one of the longest running studies of its kind in Australia, and one of only a few in the world with information on three generations of family members (i.e., the young people, their parents, and now the young people's children).