Project

Tangled tales, entangled ales: Examining ‘recursive islandness’ through themes of place in Newfoundland craft beer

Goal: With islands understood as generative sites of relational entanglement, and craft beer itself described as a zone of entanglement and meaning-building, it should come as no surprise that Newfoundland’s craft beer brands are brimming with richly entangled themes of place. But what does that look like?
This creative thesis project examines themes of place in the burgeoning craft beer community on the island of Newfoundland. Engaging Patchwork ontologies and traditional textile practices, these themes will be mapped onto an existing (literal) patchwork quilt. In doing so, the patchwork itself becomes a site of generative ‘becoming’ and the project reveals itself as a figure of recursive islandness.
When the intangible becomes tangible, knowledge is able to be shared in accessible, relatable ways. This project seeks to highlight the richness – and fun! – of relational approaches and tangled tales, opening up opportunities for alternative forms of thought and practice in Island Studies and the broader Anthropocene

Date: 1 March 2019

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Project log

Maggie J Whitten Henry
added a research item
(VIDEO: https://maggiejwhittenhenry.wordpress.com/thesis/) With islands understood as generative sites of relational entanglement, and craft beer itself described as a zone of entanglement and meaning-building, it should come as no surprise that Newfoundland’s craft beer brands are brimming with richly entangled themes of place. But what does that *look* like? In this presentation, Maggie Henry discusses her ongoing creative thesis project which examines themes of place in the burgeoning craft beer community on the island of Newfoundland. Engaging Patchwork ontologies and traditional textile practices, these themes will be mapped onto an existing (literal) patchwork quilt. In doing so, the patchwork itself becomes a site of generative ‘becoming’ and the project reveals itself as a figure of recursive islandness. When the intangible becomes tangible, knowledge is able to be shared in accessible, relatable ways. This project seeks to highlight the richness – and fun! – of relational approaches and tangled tales, opening up opportunities for alternative forms of thought and practice in Island Studies and the broader Anthropocene.
Maggie J Whitten Henry
added an update
I was honoured to have the opportunity to speak about my work as part of the #R2R2020 'Passport to Research' session this week, where a panel of emerging rural researchers discussed their projects, purpose, and challenges as part of the Rural Talks to Rural 2020 virtual conference. For those who weren't able to attend live, the session was recorded and will be available to stream at http://www.ruralcreativity.org/r2r-conference
More info: The LIBRO CREDIT UNION Passport to Research brings together a new crowd of researchers from across Canada who are working on exciting new rural research initiatives. Moderated by University of Guelph’s Libro Professor for Regional Economic Development, Ryan Gibson, he will facilitate connections between emerging researchers and our rural communities. Featuring: Abdul-Rahim Abdulai (University of Guelph), Cameron Gunton (Simon Fraser University), Louis Helps (University of Guelph), and Maggie Henry (University of Prince Edward Island).
 
Maggie J Whitten Henry
added a project goal
With islands understood as generative sites of relational entanglement, and craft beer itself described as a zone of entanglement and meaning-building, it should come as no surprise that Newfoundland’s craft beer brands are brimming with richly entangled themes of place. But what does that look like?
This creative thesis project examines themes of place in the burgeoning craft beer community on the island of Newfoundland. Engaging Patchwork ontologies and traditional textile practices, these themes will be mapped onto an existing (literal) patchwork quilt. In doing so, the patchwork itself becomes a site of generative ‘becoming’ and the project reveals itself as a figure of recursive islandness.
When the intangible becomes tangible, knowledge is able to be shared in accessible, relatable ways. This project seeks to highlight the richness – and fun! – of relational approaches and tangled tales, opening up opportunities for alternative forms of thought and practice in Island Studies and the broader Anthropocene