Project

Supervision in Psychological Professions - building a personalised model

Goal: Working with Mary Watts and Sarah Corrie just published Supervision in the Psychological Professions through Open University Press - Has been an interesting project bringing together practitioners across the world to look at how they use supervision in their context and then bringing together a framework to build personalised models

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Project log

David Lane
added a research item
This chapter provides an overview of the role of supervision in psychological practice
David Lane
added a research item
Since its introduction to clinical psychology regulation in 1969, formula-tion has become a defining skill of applied psychology. Different forms of pro-fessional psychology define the term in dif-ferent ways, and the extent to which formulation has a scientific basis and is drawn directly from psychological theory varies between disciplines (see Lane & Corrie, 2006). Nonetheless, there is fairly broad agreement that the ability to construct formulations is central to applied psychology practice (British Psychological Society, 2005; Corrie & Lane, 2006; Johnstone & Dallos, 2006) and much time, during initial training and subsequent professional development, will be spent in the service of acquiring and refining this complex skill. However, the role that formulation should play in the emerging discipline and profession of coaching psychology is yet to be adequately considered. In this paper, we argue for the centrality of formulation in coaching psychology and propose that the quality of coaching practice can be signifi-cantly enhanced by elevating formulation to the heart of the coach-client partnership. In order to contextualise our argument, we begin with an overview of the way in which formulation has been conceptualised in the literature more broadly, and consider some of the debates concerning its role in practice. We then examine some of the fac-tors that may have led this to being a rela-tively neglected topic in coaching psychology and consider ways in which elevating formu-lation to the heart of coaching psychology might contribute to the development of high quality practice. Finally, we propose an approach to formulation that can help coaches achieve a more rigorous and system-atic approach regardless of their theoretical preferences. This approach is, we believe, relevant regardless of whether the coaching journey is undertaken with an individual seeking personal guidance, a team seeking higher levels of performance, or an organi-sation seeking a strategic change of direc-tion. Coaching is very broadly based and the formulation process happens at different
David Lane
added a research item
Supervision and being Supervised: preparing, undertaking, refining and enhancing our experience Supervision has now become accepted practice not just for trainees but throughout our careers in many areas of coaching and psychology. This raises questions about what as supervisors (or supervises) we do to prepare for and undertake supervision. However, the wider contexts for supervision also raises questions about how we refine our practice in the light of the different issues of power, diversity, resistance and rupture that are entailed. Finally we have to address how we develop our practice through enhancing our competence to deal with ethical dilemmas, changing demands and the impact of our work on our own needs as professionals. A brief overview of a model for thinking about these issues will be outlined.
David Lane
added a project goal
Working with Mary Watts and Sarah Corrie just published Supervision in the Psychological Professions through Open University Press - Has been an interesting project bringing together practitioners across the world to look at how they use supervision in their context and then bringing together a framework to build personalised models