Project

Spatio-temporal dynamics of urban growth in the greater Houston area: 1997-2017

Goal: The Houston-Galveston metropolitan area has experienced extraordinary growth over the past two decades. While census data provides a unique insight into the nature of that growth, its sparse temporal frequency limits its application for assessing fine-grained change. This study takes a different approach to quantifying how the greater Houston area is changing, agnostic to ground sampled data on development and population growth. Instead, this research leverages over twenty years of satellite observation to synoptically characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of land cover change on an annual basis from 1997-2017. Driven by a demand for spatio-temporal accuracy and consistency, we employ 262 Landsat images across three space-borne observation platforms to classify land cover change using a three-part algorithmic procedure: automated training data selection of NLCD cover using Automatic Adaptive Signature Generalization (AASG), random forests image classification, and a series of spatio-temporal filters, which allow for an annual, spectrally-based classification of the NLCD’s Developed - Open class, otherwise classified using non-spectral, decadal, ancillary data. The classification time series is validated using accuracy comparison with NLCD products from 2001, 2006, and 2011, as well as independent high resolution satellite data from Ikonos, Quickbird, and Worldview sensors . Results include detailed change maps, conversion time series, uncertainty maps, and a categorization of urbanization morphologies in the Houston area. In addition to its methodological innovations in the field of remote sensing, these results confirm that extraordinary scale of urbanization in Houston, especially in floodplains and ecologically sensitive areas. https://chrishakkenberg.wixsite.com/home/featured-projects

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Christopher R Hakkenberg
added a research item
Urbanization results in increasing impervious surfaces with the potential to threaten fragile environments and heighten flood risks. In the United States, research on the social processes driving urbanization has tended to focus on the twenty-first century, but less is known about how temporal trends arose from the spatial layout of developed land upon which this growth was founded. To address this gap, we present a novel interdisciplinary synthesis using neighborhood-level census data in tandem with a satellite-derived annual land cover change time series to assess the role of race, affluence, and socioeconomic status in shaping spatio-temporal urbanization in the Houston metropolitan area from 1997-2016. Results from cross-sectional and temporal regression models indicate that while social dynamics associated with historical versus recent urbanization are related, they are not identical. Thus, while temporal change in urbanization is driven primarily by socioeconomic status, the social dynamics associated with spatial disparities in urbanization relate primarily to race, regardless of socioeconomic status. The results are noteworthy as urbanization in Houston does not fully comport with existing theoretical perspectives or with empirical findings nationally. Instead, we suggest these findings reflect the city's politics and culture surrounding land use. Thus, beyond its important social and environmental implications, this study affirms the utility of fusing socio-demographic data with satellite remote sensing of urban growth, and highlights the value of the socioenvironmental succession framework for characterizing urbanization as a recursive process in space and time.
Christopher R Hakkenberg
added a research item
The characterization of fine temporal-resolution land surface dynamics from broadband optical satellite sensors is constrained by sparse acquisitions of high-quality imagery; interscene variation in radiometric, phenological, atmospheric, and illumination conditions; and subpixel variability in heterogeneous environments. In this letter, we address these concerns by developing and testing the automatic adaptive signature generalization and regression (AASGr) algorithm. Provided a robust reference map corresponding to the date of one image, AASGr automates the prediction of continuous fields maps from imagery time series that is adaptive to the spectral and radiometric characteristics of each target image and thereby requires neither atmospheric correction nor data normalization. We tested AASGr on a 22-year Landsat time series to quantify subannual impervious fractional cover dynamics in Houston, TX--an area characterized by a high degree of spatial heterogeneity in surface cover and high frequency in land cover change. The map time series achieved high accuracy in a three-part validation procedure and reveals spatio-temporal dynamics of urban intensification and extensification at a level of detail previously elusive in discrete classifications or coarse temporal-resolution map products. The automation of continuous fields time series is enabling a new generation of land surface products capable of characterizing precise morphologies along a continuum of spatio-temporal change. While AASGr was applied here to predict subpixel impervious fractional cover from Landsat imagery, the method is generalizable to a range of imagery and applications requiring dense continuous fields time series with uncertainty estimates of geophysical and biochemical characteristics, such as leaf area index, biomass, and albedo.
Christopher R Hakkenberg
added a research item
In 2017, Hurricane Harvey caused substantial loss of life and property in the swiftly urbanizing region of Houston, TX. Now in its wake, researchers are tasked with investigating how to plan for and mitigate the impact of similar events in the future, despite expectations of increased storm intensity and frequency as well as accelerating urbanization trends. Critical to this task is the development of automated workflows for producing accurate and consistent land cover maps of sufficiently fine spatio-temporal resolution over large areas and long timespans. In this study, we developed an innovative automated classification algorithm that overcomes some of the traditional trade-offs between fine spatio-temporal resolution and extent – to produce a multi-scene, 30m annual land cover time series characterizing 21 years of land cover dynamics in the 35,000 km2 Greater Houston area. The ensemble algorithm takes advantage of the synergistic value of employing all acceptable Landsat imagery in a given year, using aggregate votes from the posterior predictive distributions of multiple image composites to mitigate against misclassifications in any one image, and fill gaps due to missing and contaminated data, such as those from clouds and cloud shadows. The procedure is fully automated, combining adaptive signature generalization and spatio-temporal stabilization for consistency across sensors and scenes. The land cover time series is validated using independent, multi-temporal fine-resolution imagery, achieving crisp overall accuracies between 78–86% and fuzzy overall accuracies between 91–94%. Validated maps and corresponding areal cover estimates corroborate what census and economic data from the Greater Houston area likewise indicate: rapid growth from 1997–2017, demonstrated by the conversion of 2,040 km² (± 400 km²) to developed land cover, 14% of which resulted from the conversion of wetlands. Beyond its implications for urbanization trends in Greater Houston, this study demonstrates the potential for automated approaches to quantifying large extent, fine resolution land cover change, as well as the added value of temporally-dense time series for characterizing higher-order spatio-temporal dynamics of land cover, including periodicity, abrupt transitions, and time lags from underlying demographic and socio-economic trends.
Christopher R Hakkenberg
added an update
Monitoring Greater Houston from space: twenty years of dramatic land cover change
The Houston-Galveston metropolitan area has experienced extraordinary growth over the past two decades. While census data provides a unique insight into the nature of that growth, its sparse temporal frequency limits its application for assessing fine-grained change. This study takes a different approach to quantifying how the greater Houston area is changing, agnostic to ground sampled data on development and population growth. Instead, this research leverages over twenty years of satellite observation to synoptically characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of land cover change on an annual basis from 1997-2017. Driven by a demand for spatio-temporal accuracy and consistency, we employ 262 Landsat images across three space-borne observation platforms to classify land cover change using a three-part algorithmic procedure: automated training data selection of NLCD cover using Automatic Adaptive Signature Generalization (AASG), random forests image classification, and a series of spatio-temporal filters, which allow for an annual, spectrally-based classification of the NLCD’s Developed - Open class, otherwise classified using non-spectral, decadal, ancillary data. The classification time series is validated using accuracy comparison with NLCD products from 2001, 2006, and 2011, as well as independent high resolution satellite data from Ikonos, Quickbird, and Worldview sensors . Results include detailed change maps, conversion time series, uncertainty maps, and a categorization of urbanization morphologies in the Houston area. In addition to its methodological innovations in the field of remote sensing, these results confirm that extraordinary scale of urbanization in Houston, especially in floodplains and ecologically sensitive areas.
 
Christopher R Hakkenberg
added a project goal
The Houston-Galveston metropolitan area has experienced extraordinary growth over the past two decades. While census data provides a unique insight into the nature of that growth, its sparse temporal frequency limits its application for assessing fine-grained change. This study takes a different approach to quantifying how the greater Houston area is changing, agnostic to ground sampled data on development and population growth. Instead, this research leverages over twenty years of satellite observation to synoptically characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of land cover change on an annual basis from 1997-2017. Driven by a demand for spatio-temporal accuracy and consistency, we employ 262 Landsat images across three space-borne observation platforms to classify land cover change using a three-part algorithmic procedure: automated training data selection of NLCD cover using Automatic Adaptive Signature Generalization (AASG), random forests image classification, and a series of spatio-temporal filters, which allow for an annual, spectrally-based classification of the NLCD’s Developed - Open class, otherwise classified using non-spectral, decadal, ancillary data. The classification time series is validated using accuracy comparison with NLCD products from 2001, 2006, and 2011, as well as independent high resolution satellite data from Ikonos, Quickbird, and Worldview sensors . Results include detailed change maps, conversion time series, uncertainty maps, and a categorization of urbanization morphologies in the Houston area. In addition to its methodological innovations in the field of remote sensing, these results confirm that extraordinary scale of urbanization in Houston, especially in floodplains and ecologically sensitive areas. https://chrishakkenberg.wixsite.com/home/featured-projects