Archived project

SophiaEuropa Project (2005 - 2008); Overhead: Prof. Antonio Russo (Italy)

Goal: The Warsaw research group of the SophiaEuropa Project was chaired by Dr. Boguslawa Lewandowska, and, the workgroup made research in association with the Centre for Culture, Technology & Values, Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, Ireland - Chair Prof. Eamonn Conway.

The relevant topics for this project:
◾RELIGION & CULTURE
◾VALUES & EUROPE
◾TECHNOLOGY, SCIENCE & VALUES
◾CULTURE & VALUES

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Project log

Boguslawa Lewandowska Gruszka
added a research item
The physical sciences are fascinated by reality and draw their concept of reality from experiential knowledge. In science, we interpret what we see so we can understand it. This means that an event or phenomenon makes sense not only superficially, as it registers to our senses, but also as our interpretation of those senses — that is, as we find it intelligible within certain routines of analysis and expectation formulation. Therefore, cognition and perception are inseparable acts because understanding cannot see and the senses cannot think. This is the basis for a particular kind of reasoning which in scientific research becomes a model. As models become increasingly dominant, they are called paradigms. Moreover, certain preconceptions precede theoretical formulations — that is, Kuhn's concept of paradigm. Paradigms are governing models that, in some fairly broad range of experience, set the context of explanation and intelligibility of that which is to be explained and understood. Since paradigms range in scope from broad to narrow, discussing a hierarchical ordering of paradigms is reasonable: i.e., their scopes may be listed in descending or ascending order. Therefore, the possibility of choosing, within reasonable bounds, a set of hierarchically ordered paradigms reveals the numerous layers of metaphysics that exist in reality and its description (science). What remain are the questions that arise as to the nature of these metaphysical presuppositions and the method through which they are formulated, which also stands on a metaphysical ground (https://works.bepress.com/boguslawa_lewandowska/4/).
Boguslawa Lewandowska Gruszka
added a research item
The key-problem of the presented thesis is that evolutionary processes are conditioned both by unique phenomena and probabilistic ones. And because of the probabilistic factors, we are talking on changeability of evolution. It is not an easy task to model evolutionary processes, and sa it is shown in this paper, an attempt at making this modelling changeability in the natural sciences, in the framework of determinism and indeterminism, appears to be inadequate to apprehend evolutionary processes. It is concluded here, that only autodeterminism is appeared as a possible framework for solving the problem, as delivering possibility to present the causal, functional, and probabilistic dimension of evolution. Such an approach ensures the possibility of perceiving and presenting the complexity of evolution. As it is postulated, the synthetic theory of evolution is the theory of evolution, which is the conjunction joins factors of evolution, determinism and changeability. The other problem considering in this paper is whether we are being allowed to say that real being, which is existing in the stream of time, is the subject of philosophy. This problem is explained here by showing that besides the scientific cognition of nature there is still place for another possible cognition called the philosophical cognition, since there exists a significant group of the problems of philosophical cosmology which are not taken up by natural sciences because of their own research methods. https://www.worldcat.org/title/intelligent-design-artificial-intelligence-the-ghost-in-the-machine/oclc/694183788&referer=brief_results
Boguslawa Lewandowska Gruszka
added a research item
https://www.amazon.com/Culture-Technology-Values-Dimensions-European/dp/1899820485 The aim of the paper is to present some reflections on the ethics of capitalism – the economic, social and political system which dominates today’s world and is seen by many as the only proper system. However there existed many critics (Saint-Simon, Simonde de Sismondi, Marks) of this system who called it inhuman, unjust, exploitive etc. and who proposed alternatives for capitalism. These were then challenged by advocates of capitalism (Hayek, Mises, Berger). They criticized alternatives of capitalism and tried to prove that freedom, individualism, initiative, economic growth and wealth can be best achieved in capitalism. They admitted that capitalism has some faults but there is no ,,better” system. As mentioned above capitalism is an economic, social and political system and therefore it is closely linked to ethics. It is regarded as giving the most possibilities to individuals and groups for initiatives, development, creativities etc. compared to other socio – economic systems. It is also regarded as giving the most freedom to the society. Free market, democracy and civil society are linked to each other in capitalism. It is believed that they can only be achieved in capitalism. However there are also some ethical problems associated with capitalism like selfishness, difference between rich and poor, the role of the state, monopoly, exploitation, globalization etc.. They arise because the system allows the development of a pluralistic society which is characterized by social and cultural pluralism. A pluralistic society assumes the existence and functioning of different, autonomic agents who compete with each other while trying to achieve their own goals. Various systems of values, ideas how to build the socio-economic system appear and fight each other which can even lead to a disintegration of the society. Therefore one can not say that capitalism is flawless. It bears some important ethical problems but is the 'best' system compared to others.
Boguslawa Lewandowska Gruszka
added 2 research items
The idea of human rights – western culture heritage or universal value? Boguslawa Lewandowska, Stanislaw Cichocki In both the Charter of United Nations (San Francisco, 1945) and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Paris, 1948) the view of the universality of human rights can be found. However one can ask if these documents written in the ring of western culture’s values can be accepted in societies, which traditionally choose a social and economic system restricting civil rights in politics, economics, culture etc. The second question we like to pose asks whether the preservation of human rights is independent or connected to the implementation of a social and economic system in the society. In this connection the economic system either assumes or not human rights as a condition of participation in economic processes. We show the philosophical foundations of human rights universalism. We also show historical examples of modern societies (Western and Eastern), which are characterized by the presence of human rights as well as a correlation between economic growth of the society and political, social and economic freedom of the individuum.
Boguslawa Lewandowska Gruszka
added a project goal
The Warsaw research group of the SophiaEuropa Project was chaired by Dr. Boguslawa Lewandowska, and, the workgroup made research in association with the Centre for Culture, Technology & Values, Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, Ireland - Chair Prof. Eamonn Conway.
The relevant topics for this project:
◾RELIGION & CULTURE
◾VALUES & EUROPE
◾TECHNOLOGY, SCIENCE & VALUES
◾CULTURE & VALUES