Project

Situated Data: Participatory Sociotechnical Assessment of Upgraded Informal Settlements in São Paulo, Brazil

Goal: Situated Data is a postdoctoral study that breaks out of the Latin American Housing Network at The University of Texas at Austin (https://www.lahn.utexas.org/) and has three parts: (1) the development of a participatory methodology for evaluating incremental and non-incremental housing types in upgraded informal settlements; (2) the implementation of the methodology across two of São Paulo’s largest informal settlements (n = 1,032); (3) the development of a data visualization tool called ComuniDADOS. The primary objective is to measure the sociotechnical variations across incremental housing environments, and produce data that can help communities prioritize development decision-making.

Subtopics that emerged through the study include the participatory assessment of slum upgrading, the merger of remote geospatial and field-based methods, tracing the evolution of incremental housing stock, and the use of digital tools for translating data into outcomes that improve conditions in informal settlements.

Supported by a National Science Foundation grant (#1513395), a large scale household survey was undertaken between 2015 and 2017 across two comparative cases in São Paulo, in collaboration with community partners, and has the following results:

Documentation and digital simulation of how 932 incremental houses have evolved over three decades.

Documentation of 100 formal social housing units.

Construction of an expanding graphic, photographic, and numerical database.

Transcription of respondents’ life trajectories, with particular focus on involvement in incremental housing evolution.

Tracing of material resource streams that shape incremental housing and its broader informal environments

Interviews with 100 Minha Casa Minha Vida social housing inscribers

Collaborative production of a project film, with community partners (presented at UNHabitat III in 2016)

Documentation of physical conversion strategies, spaces, and resource streams

Creation of a participatory sociotechnical methodology

Construction of a GIS-based data visualization tool (awarded a National 2018 American Planning Association Smart Cities Technology Division award)

Identification of planning and policy issues that require further research

Generation of four sub-studies in case communities and comparative Latin American contexts

Date: 1 September 2015

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Project log

Kristine Stiphany
added an update
This update permits users to view study data in a comparative format, with a choice to aggregate lot and building scale data to block or locally defined district ("nucleo") scales.
 
Kristine Stiphany
added 4 research items
Although Brazilian housing policy has historically focused upon upgrading and regenerating informal settlements, (urbanização), since 2009 the prioritisation of mass housing has led to social exclusion and spatial segregation across the country's urban peripheries. Using a combined ethnographic and geospatial analysis, we provide a critical analysis of MCMVE (Minha Casa Minha Vida Entidades), a community-based housing programme that alleges the use of autogestão-collective urban management organised around an ethos of social transformation. We find this claim to be misleading. Although MCMVE ostensibly increases access to housing, it is encouraging residents to leave established, well located settlements and relocate to isolated, peripheral tracts of land. Our study emphasises the need to reconsider how MCMVE might more productively assimilate autogestão and mass housing in the future.
This article examines the Brazilian mutirão, an incremental social housing model that was prolific across the Global South since the late 1970s, and linked to right to the city movements in Brazil. I make three arguments for guiding the mutirão's contemporary translation. First, incremental housing models, and the mutirão in particular, are a form of architecture production that reproduces sociospatial segregation. Second, this unevenness was widely debated in the 1970s, yet generally forgotten or ignored by the discipline of architecture. Third, drawing on a large scale study of incremental housing in São Paulo (NSF#1513395), I argue that the mutirão’s most recent variations reveal incremental housing’s actual agency, beyond typological historicism. Doing so can help the work of architecture to transform and better serve contemporary housing issues globally.
Kristine Stiphany
added a project goal
Situated Data is a postdoctoral study that breaks out of the Latin American Housing Network at The University of Texas at Austin (https://www.lahn.utexas.org/) and has three parts: (1) the development of a participatory methodology for evaluating incremental and non-incremental housing types in upgraded informal settlements; (2) the implementation of the methodology across two of São Paulo’s largest informal settlements (n = 1,032); (3) the development of a data visualization tool called ComuniDADOS. The primary objective is to measure the sociotechnical variations across incremental housing environments, and produce data that can help communities prioritize development decision-making.
Subtopics that emerged through the study include the participatory assessment of slum upgrading, the merger of remote geospatial and field-based methods, tracing the evolution of incremental housing stock, and the use of digital tools for translating data into outcomes that improve conditions in informal settlements.
Supported by a National Science Foundation grant (#1513395), a large scale household survey was undertaken between 2015 and 2017 across two comparative cases in São Paulo, in collaboration with community partners, and has the following results:
Documentation and digital simulation of how 932 incremental houses have evolved over three decades.
Documentation of 100 formal social housing units.
Construction of an expanding graphic, photographic, and numerical database.
Transcription of respondents’ life trajectories, with particular focus on involvement in incremental housing evolution.
Tracing of material resource streams that shape incremental housing and its broader informal environments
Interviews with 100 Minha Casa Minha Vida social housing inscribers
Collaborative production of a project film, with community partners (presented at UNHabitat III in 2016)
Documentation of physical conversion strategies, spaces, and resource streams
Creation of a participatory sociotechnical methodology
Construction of a GIS-based data visualization tool (awarded a National 2018 American Planning Association Smart Cities Technology Division award)
Identification of planning and policy issues that require further research
Generation of four sub-studies in case communities and comparative Latin American contexts