Project

SimTeach

Goal: SIMTEACH: What Can Practical Knowledge Modeled in a Teaching Simulator Contribute to Support Mathematics Teacher Learning?” (a.k.a., SIMTEACH) is a research and development grant funded by NSF in 2014 and currently ongoing (NSF Grant DRL–1420102, PI: Patricio Herbst, Co-PI: Vu MinhChieu). The project uses ideas from the study of practical rationality of mathematics teaching to develop teaching simulations that can be used to teach novices how to flexibly respond to the demands of an instructional situation. The project has developed simulations and used them to compare the performance of novices and experts as well as used the simulation to provide context and stimulus to learn how experts coach novices in the management of an instructional situation.

Date: 1 September 2015

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Vu Minh Chieu
added a project goal
SIMTEACH: What Can Practical Knowledge Modeled in a Teaching Simulator Contribute to Support Mathematics Teacher Learning?” (a.k.a., SIMTEACH) is a research and development grant funded by NSF in 2014 and currently ongoing (NSF Grant DRL–1420102, PI: Patricio Herbst, Co-PI: Vu MinhChieu). The project uses ideas from the study of practical rationality of mathematics teaching to develop teaching simulations that can be used to teach novices how to flexibly respond to the demands of an instructional situation. The project has developed simulations and used them to compare the performance of novices and experts as well as used the simulation to provide context and stimulus to learn how experts coach novices in the management of an instructional situation.
 
Vu Minh Chieu
added a research item
The primary goal of this paper is to investigate whether a computer-based simulation can detect the difference between novice and expert teachers’ decision-making in mathematics instruction, which is complex in nature. The design of the simulation is grounded in a sociological perspective on practical rationality of mathematics teaching. The simulation consists of classroom scenarios, in the form of cartoon-based storyboards, with a series of decision moments to simulate the instructional situation of doing proofs in geometry. Empirical data helped verify and revise our design hypotheses/principles and showed that the simulation was able to detect some differences between novice-teacher and expert-teacher decision-making. Results of this study could inform the development of more advanced, computational models of mathematics teachers’ decision-making.