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Self-Regulated Learning

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Scott Paris
added 11 research items
This article reports data collected in Morocco. Measures of beliefs (metacognitive knowledge of reading skills and strategies, causal attributions, and conceptions of good readers) and reading performance were collected on a cohort of 350 first-grade children over a 5-year period, and on a second cohort of 464 fifth-grade children over a 3-year period. Metacognitive and causal attribution measures predicted significant portions of variance of subsequent reading achievement beyond the effects of background variables and cognitive skills. First-graders' conception of good readers was an important predictor of beginning reading, but metacognitive knowledge of particular reading skills was not. However, among fifth and seventh graders, both metacognitive knowledge about skilled reading and causal attributions to internal factors predicted reading performance. This study is one of the first cross-cultural demonstrations that metacognitive knowledge and other beliefs affect young children's reading. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Children’s learning is the core of their everyday experiences. The principal tasks of childhood include learning physical skills for play and work, social conventions for interaction, and cognitive understanding of the environment. These tasks require a tremendous amount of children’s time and energy and are concerns of parents, teachers, and scientists alike. Our common goals are to understand and to facilitate children’s learning because it is so vital to their education and development. In this chapter we sketch a conceptual framework of children’s learning and describe motivational factors that shape children’s acquisition and refinement of various skills. We begin with several intuitive tenets about children’s learning that help to define the scope of our inquiry and to chart the paths of our proposal. We are concerned with children’s learning that is ordinary, socialized, functional, and adventurous.