Project

Science|Environment|Health

Goal: A new Science|Environment|Health (S|E|H) pedagogy aims at exploring an intrinsic win-win situation between science education and environmental/health/medicine education. On the one hand, environmental, health, and medicine contexts may motivate many students to learn science, also those who often feel alienated to science ("other smart kids"). On the other, scientific knowledge is an important basis of health and environmental literacy, and also of informed patients' decision making (medicine literacy). For more see:

Zeyer, A., & Dillon, J. (2019). Science|Environment|Health – the emergence of a new pedagogy of complex living systems. Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Science Education Research, 1(1), 9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s43031-019-0014-9

The present project is also the official platform of the Special Interest Group No 4 (SIG 4, Science|Environment|Health) of the European Research in Science Education (ESERA) conference. More information about SIG 4 and the S|E|H approach is available on the ESERA homepage https://www.esera.org/sigs/esera-special-interest-groups#esera-sig-4-science-environment-health


Colleagues who are interested in the field and wish to stay informed about the SIG 4 activities are very welcome to follow this project.

Colleagues who would like to be collaborators of this project may write to the project owner Albert Zeyer (albert.zeyer@phlu.ch), or his SIG 4 co-coordinator Kerstin Kremer (kremer@idn.uni-hannover.de).

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Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
Please find attached my probably last summary of our S|E|H work, and certainly my last action as one of the co-coordinators of SIG 4 (it is one of my greatest professional delights that Alla Keselman and I have found in Kerstin Kremer and Julia Arnold two congenial successors as new co-coordinators of the SIG 4).
In this paper, I try to recapitulate the basic aspirations of SIG 4 we started with, a good decade ago, and to condense our work into six important concerns of S|E|H: 1) the question of curricular change, 2) the role of knowledge in S|E|H contexts, 3) the danger of scientism and the tension between individual and political responsibility, 4) decision-making in S|E|H contexts, 5) the challenge of coping with uncertainty, and 6) the question of scientific holism.
Many of our/your publications are included in this part of the paper, and I try to make clear that the COVID-19 pandemic experiences have obviously shed full light on the pressing actuality of our intentions.
Even more important to me, however, is the second part of this paper, where I describe our findings of the last ESERA invited symposium and our new focus on Two-Eyed Seeing as a holistic approach to S|E|H. I shortly sketch out my personal view on Two-Eyed Seeing and how it reframes many of the contents and findings of our previous work. I then tentatively report first experiences with this concept in teacher education. I can promise you: this concept has some potentiality!
As always, I hope (and with this topic I am again pretty confident) that some of us will take up these first thoughts as an inspiration for their own work, and will develop this concept further in ways that we still do not know and expect.
For some of you, the paper may probably serve as an “appetizer” to our next mini-conference of the SIG 4 in Obergurgel on the 21st of August to the 23rd of August 2022. I am looking very much forward to meeting many of you there personally, and - indeed - there will be a roundtable about Two-Eyed Seeing (besides of many other exciting activities and topics, of course).
Hope you like the paper and - See you there.
Albert Zeyer
 
Jesper Sjöström
added a research item
In this article, we elaborate on the construct ChemoKnowings as subject-specific powerful knowings for chemical agency in the Anthropocene era. Related to constructs such as critical chemical literacy, ChemoCapabilities, and eco-reflexive chemical thinking, we unpack the construct as an example of Carlgren’s powerful knowings, which relates Young’s powerful knowledge to the idea and tradition of Bildung. It means powerful knowledge containing embodied and relational (or tacit) dimensions. ChemoKnowings can therefore be described as embodied and relational knowledge in and about chemistry – (critical) chemical knowledge that matters meaningfully to the student, connecting them to themselves and the world, and conferring an ethical compass. By situating the teaching of ChemoKnowings within a vision for chemistry teaching as a part of a world-centered vision for schooling in the Anthropocene, ChemoKnowings are viewed as having the capacity to mobilise an ethico-socio-political action, that is, chemical agency. By focusing on student transformation of content for ChemoKnowings and integrating elements of a theoretical didaktik model for eco-reflexive chemistry education, we develop a vision-oriented didaktik model for ChemoKnowings. More generally, we argue that didaktik models for supporting teachers’ consideration of student transformation of content for powerful subject-knowings are an important part of general subject didaktik. We present in the article vignettes that detail personal accounts for each of the three authors describing examples of chemistry-specific knowings that matter meaningfully to each of us, and which articulate our own embodied ethico-socio-political actions as students, teachers, researchers, and consumers. Inspired by Klafki’s didaktik analysis, we end the article by proposing four areas of questions that the teacher can use in guiding their preparation and transformation of the content they bring into the classroom for promoting students’ ChemoKnowings, and thus Bildung in the 21st century.
Kerstin Kremer
added a research item
Junge Menschen nutzen digitale Medien selbstverständlich in allen Bereichen des Lebens. Beispielsweise besitzen und nutzen 97 % der 12- bis 19-Jährigen ein internet- und filmfähiges Smartphone. Auf diese Weise können sie heute einfacher als je zuvor gesellschaftlich relevantes und zugleich naturwissenschaftlich innovatives Wissen erschließen und auch kommunizieren – und zwar auch über selbst erstellte Filme für Onlineportale wie YouTube. Die daraus resultierenden Möglichkeiten für eine innovative, interdisziplinäre Herangehensweise im Bereich der Bildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung (BNE) und der Digitalen Bildung sind Ausgangspunkt für das hier beschriebene Lehrprojekt innerhalb der ersten Phase der Lehrerinnen- und Lehrerbildung. Studierende des Faches Kunst und Studierende des Faches Biologie erstellen in fächerübergreifenden Teams mit Tablets Videos zum Thema „Virtuelles Wasser“ und loten das Potenzial einer solchen Herangehensweise für den Schulunterricht aus – sowohl für die Bildung für nachhaltige Entwicklung als auch für die Filmbildung als Teil der Digitalen Bildung. Ausgegangen wird hierbei davon, dass beide Bereiche Teil einer zeitgemäßen Lehrerinnen- und Lehrerbildung sind und die gewählte interdisziplinäre, projekt- und forschungsorientierte Lehrform die Kompetenzentwicklung der zukünftigen Lehrenden genau für diese Bereiche unterstützt, die stark von der Einnahme einer inneren Haltung und der Bereitschaft zur Handlungsveränderung geprägt sind.
Kerstin Kremer
added a research item
Science|Environment|Health (S|E|H) is a new science pedagogy that aims at promoting the mutual benefit between the three educational fields of science education, environmental education, and health education. Holism and its conceptualisation has become an important topic in recent S|E|H work. In this paper, featuring the invited symposium of the ESERA special interest group 4 at the ESERA conference 2021, we suggest the concept of Two-Eyed Seeing as a basis for the definition of scientific holism in S|E|H. Two-Eyed Seeing as a metaphor was introduced by science education researchers working with Canadian aborigines. Based on Sellars's concept of stereoscopic view, we conceptualize Two-Eyed Seeing in S|E|H through an ontological framework. We define scientific holism as the "eye switch" from the scientific image to students' life-world image, a transition that we consider as equally important as the-more common-reductionist "eye switch" from students' life-worlds back to the scientific image. Two-Eyed Seeing may then be understood as a continuous circulation of repeated "eye switches" between life-world image and scientific image. We illustrate this approach by three symposium contributions-communicating the meta-organism in school, scientific holism against eco-and health depression, and a holistic visual tool to approach S|E|H competences-and we discuss consequences for teaching and research in science education. We point out that, in a new S|E|H pedagogy and beyond, Two-Eyed Seeing may be a helpful extension to the well-established socio-scientific issues approach.
Uwe K Simon
added a research item
Viruses have become a prominent issue in public health, politics and economics due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Yet they have still met little attention in educational research, although misconceptions concerning viruses may contribute to antibiotics misuse, disbelief in existence of viruses and distrust in vaccination. We investigated knowledge and attitudes in Austria concerning Covid-19, viruses in general and vaccination. We conducted two cross-sectional online surveys. Study A was performed Austrian-wide (N = 1027), study B specifically targeted Austrian students from middle and high schools (N = 1728). Several participants did not believe in the existence of SARS-CoV-2. General vaccination damage was highly overrated. Many defined viruses as unicellular organisms or bacteria, and 6-10 % believed that they can be killed by antibiotics. Very many participants were unable to identify, whether a specific disease was caused by a virus or another pathogen. Knowledge was significantly correlated with level of education/grade and interest in virology. Additionally, willingness to become vaccinated was significantly correlated with knowledge. Many participants felt insufficiently informed about viruses at school. We strongly recommend that virus-related school education must highly improve to enable the population to correctly assess health-related information, counter fake news and come to scientifically informed decisions.
Julia Caroline Arnold
added an update
Dear colleagues and friends of the ESERA SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health,
we are pleased to invite you to the upcoming 3rd ESERA SIG4 Science|Environment|Health Mini Conference, which will be hosted by Suzanne Kapelari and her team. The Mini Conference takes place from Sunday, 21st until Tuesday, 23rd of August 2020 in Obergurgl, Austria.
Please submit your application to Susanne.Rafolt@uibk.ac.at until the 29th of April 2022using the attached form.
For more information, see the attached information.
Best wishes
Susanne Rafolt (local host)
@Suzanne Kapelari (local host)
Kerstin Kremer (SIG coordinator)
Julia Arnold (SIG coordinator)
 
Julia Caroline Arnold
added an update
Dear colleagues and friends of the ESERA SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health,
we are pleased to inform you about an upcoming special issue of the journal Sustainability on "Reflexive Processes on Health and Sustainability in Education". With this special issue we would like to open a discussion about (various) conceptions of health promotion from the perspective of biology / science education, as well as empirical results on the application and impact of specific conceptions.
For more information, see the attached flyer or online at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability/special_issues/Reflexive_Processes_Health_Sustainability_Education. The guest editors will also be happy to assist you: Julia Arnold (julia.arnold@fhnw.ch) and Sarah Dannemann (sarah.dannemann@hu-berlin.de)
Best,
Sarah & Julia
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
we finally did it!
The paper
Prediction and Adaption in Science|Environment|Health Contexts
from the SIG4 invited ESERA symposium has come out in the Springer Selected papers book of the ESERA conference 2019 in Bologna, Italy.
In complex systems, don't predict, adapt! said the theoretical physicist Per Bak, already some 30 years ago. Two years ago, we, 11 members of the SIG and participants of the invited symposium, were thinking about what this could mean in Science|Environment|Health contexts.
It was a hard piece of work, but it's surely more topical then ever in times of pandemic!
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
we are happy to announce that the new Springer book:
Science | Environment | Health Towards a Science Pedagogy of Complex Living Systems Second Edition
has recently come out. It is the result of a fruitful and vibrant two-year cooperation of some twenty researchers and friends of the ESERA Special Interest Group Science|Environment|Health (S|E|H). Regula Kyburz-Graber and I as editors are proud to present the 14 chapters that will give you inspiration and the kick to dwell into the fascinating and highly topical issue of complex living systems.
In the preface, we write
The theory of complex living systems provides a compelling background for working with S|E|H contexts. It unifes organisms and their natural environment in an encompassing theoretical framework and provides a discursive resource for talking about limits of traditional scientific approaches to S|E|H from inside science. Using rational argumentation, it gives a scientific voice to holistic views beyond prediction and control. The limits of predictability in complex living systems result in structural uncertainty for decision-making, and they ask for emphasising and rethinking the role of pedagogical concepts like informed citizenship and scientific literacy in science education. Coping with structural uncertainty means accepting it as a basic characteristic of life and bringing scientific reasoning into reflective equilibrium with other, personal resources like empathy and a care perspective. Complexity theory and structural uncertainty challenge crude scientifc determinism in science education that results all too often in students’ eco- and health depression. In complex living systems, the ‘horizon of the future’ remains always open. Hope should never die in a new S|E|H pedagogy.
For more, see the book matter attached.
 
Benedikt Heuckmann
added a research item
We conducted a short subject matter knowledge-based intervention in a quasi-experimental design and explored whether providing health-related subject matter knowledge affects university students' risk perception and their behavioural intentions. We chose the everyday context of using antiperspirants that contain aluminium and focused on the presumption that antiperspirants facilitate Alzheimer's disease development. This study was devoted to a risk perception gap caused by the epistemic and ontological uncertainty involved in the contextual background of using antiperspirants and developing Alzheimer's disease. By computing repeated measures ANOVA, we found that imparting subject matter knowledge as system, action-related and effectiveness health knowledge increased students' cognitive and affective risk perception. Path analyses revealed that cognitive and affective risk perception had an indirect, negative effect on behavioural intentions towards using antiperspirants. Attitudes and perceived behavioural control fully mediated the relationship between risk perception and intention. The mediation effect differed between students who received subject matter knowledge and students who did not. We discuss the findings from our study related to the role of subject matter knowledge for understanding risk perception, the ambiguity of overcoming and creating a risk perception gap when uncertainty holds and how risk perception relates to attitudes and behavioural intention.
Claes Malmberg
added a research item
Health and sustainable development are two urgent and global issues that need to be addressed by all societies. They are also an important part of school curricula and present in everyday teaching. Hence, education has a key function in qualifying and socialising students to become active individuals and citizens. Accordingly, health and sustainable development should be considered as both science and social science issues. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss how health and sustainable development are described in Swedish textbooks for biology, science and physical education and health. The theoretical point of departure is the distinction between individual and societal/political responsibility. The chapter argues that the textbooks create what we call a ‘paradox of responsibility’. This means that the problems are de-politicised (individualised) and that responsibility is placed on the individual rather than on the societal/political level even when such solutions are needed. How textbooks portray such science and social science issues is of great importance since it influences students’ understanding of the problems and their thinkable solutions. We argue that health and sustainable development in school should always be portrayed as both individual and societal/political issues to empower students to deal with them in an adequate way.
Albert Zeyer
added 2 research items
In recent years, complexity theory has turned out to be an important conceptual approach to Science|Environment|Health. Though complex systems, in principle, can be understood by scientific method, prediction is uncertain, and control is limited. In living systems, this uncertainty is structural, i.e. it cannot be fully reduced by improving scientific understanding or by engineering. Complexity is the very source of self-organisation. It is a structural characteristic of life itself. Thus, structural uncertainty signifies an intrinsic cognitive limit and asks for other, complementary, resources of coping. Strategies of interpretation and adaption may be as important as those of prediction and control, and it may be helpful to complement analytic type 2 thinking with holistic type 1 thinking. This sheds a new light on important concepts in science education, like informed citizenship and scientific literacy. At the end of this chapter, I look at the concept of shared decision-making and the evidence and preference approach, which are not yet standard in medical practice but are frequently seen as an indicator of good medical quality. We ask if they may provide inspiration to a new Science|Environment|Health pedagogy.
The basic vision of Science|Environment|Health (S|E|H) is to foster a win-win situation between the three educational fields of science education, environmental education and health education. This vision finds growing interest among the science education community. The theory of complex living systems provides a compelling background for working with S|E|H contexts. It unifies organisms and their natural environment in an encompassing theoretical framework and provides a discursive resource for talking about limits of traditional scientific approaches to S|E|☺ from inside science. Using rational argumentation, it gives a scientific voice to holistic views beyond prediction and control. The limits of predictability in complex living systems result in structural uncertainty for decision-making, and they ask for emphasising and rethinking the role of pedagogical concepts like informed citizenship and scientific literacy in science education. Complexity theory and structural uncertainty challenge crude scientific determinism in science education that results all too often in students’ eco- and health depression. In complex living systems, the horizon of the future remains always open. Hope should never die in a new S|E|H pedagogy.
Alexander Büssing
added a research item
As part of the Science|Environment|Health pedagogy, educators utilize socioscientific issues to foster student motivation and decision-making processes. However, students will only engage in higher-order learning processes if they perceive the respective issues to be meaningful to them, which means they feel concerned by and close to them. As this connection is currently poorly understood, this chapter proposes the theory of psychological distance as a fine-grained approach to understand more precisely people’s connectedness towards environmental and health issues. Based on the four dimensions of temporal, spatial, social, and hypothetical distance, we show how psychological distance may relate to science teaching and learning. In particular, we explain how the theory (1) helps to better understand climate action using the example of Fridays for Future, (2) can be used to understand the framing and perception of health messages, and (3) could assist science teachers interested in constructing teaching resources that make use of psychological distance. Additionally, the chapter offers an empirical perspective by illustrating socio-psychological measurement possibilities and results from empirical studies about the connections between psychological distance and teaching motivation. The chapter concludes with a discussion of further applications of psychological distance in environmental and health education within the context of Science|Environment|Health.
Julia Caroline Arnold
added a research item
In this chapter, we argue that, in order to contribute to health and environmental education, science education in classroom teaching, in research, development, and teacher education as well as in educational policy should 1) include the complex nature of the multidisciplinary problems by fostering conceptual understanding about systems from different angles and disciplines and systems thinking skills, 2) aim to equip students with a sound understanding of the nature of science and the nature of scientific knowledge and how to deal with uncertainty, 3) take into account attitudes, values, and subjective needs in decision-making as well as focus on a reflective attitude towards them, and should 4) include critical thinking skills and the ability to evaluate information critically. Finally, we combine these aspects to a vision of science education that is fit to support students in becoming reflected decision-makers. Additionally, we give ideas about how this vision could be turned into reality by transforming science education on the levels of classroom teaching, school development, teacher education, educational research and educational policy.
Kerstin Kremer
added a research item
At the core of the Agenda 2030 are 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The aim of the SDGs is to secure a sustainable, peaceful, prosperous and equitable life on Earth for everyone now and in the future. To achieve the SDGs, education for sustainable development (ESD) aims to develop competencies that empower individuals to reflect on their own actions, taking into account their current and future social, cultural, economic and environmental impacts, from a local and a global perspective. Therefore, ESD must define new knowledge, skills, values and attitudes and evaluate effective ways towards a new pedagogy. Science education faces the challenge of the SDGs and ESD in different ways: (1) it plays a dominant role in equipping students with an adequate understanding of the complexity and the causes of global challenges such as climate change, water scarcity, energy transition or biodiversity loss; (2) it seeks to find new ways to integrate scientific knowledge and skills into real-world situations and elucidate ways to connect knowledge to sustainability-relevant values and attitudes; (3) it has to overcome disciplinary boundaries to understanding a problem comprehensively and, at the same time, provide discipline-specific knowledge and skills to solve the problem. This Special Issue focuses on empirical educational research and theoretical considerations that address transformational competences in science education in the context of the SDGs. It is designed to present new pedagogical approaches that aim to empower learners and teachers to contribute to a sustainable future and to evaluate their effectiveness in science education. Papers can focus on, e.g., new curricula or textbooks, teacher education, classroom and informal learning, whole-institution approaches, action-oriented and transformative learning approaches in science education.
Albert Zeyer
added a research item
The term Science|Environment|Health (S|E|H) stands for a pedagogy of mutual benefit between science education, environmental education, and health education. Complexity is an important aspect of most S|E|H issues. In the natural sciences, and thus in science education, prediction plays a central role. Yet, complex systems usually do not allow for full prediction. “Don’t predict, adapt!” is a famous slogan in complexity talk. But what does adaption look like in complex systems and what role can scientific knowledge play in it? This paper features a symposium where three S|E|H examples were presented in which the relationship between prediction and adaption is important. The paper also includes a theoretical contribution that discusses the concept of dual-process theories as a potential theoretical framework. The main outcome of the symposium is that while understanding “as prediction” plays the central role in traditional science, understanding “as interpretation” is at least as equally important in S|E|H contexts. In terms of dual-process theories, the first is a type 2 process, while the second is type 1. Good decision-making in S|E|H contexts involves a complementary interplay between these two types of understanding science.
Claes Malmberg
added 2 research items
Abstract This article discusses the socioscientific issue of obesity in relation to citizenship and democratic politics. It is structured in three parts: a) a theoretical part that elaborates on health as an individual and/or societal problem and the concepts of politics, democracy and citizenship; b) an empirical part on how responsibility for obesity is treated in Swedish teaching materials for science and health education; and c) a discussion where the empirical results are analyzed in relation to the theoretical framework used and the implications for future health education with regard to individual responsibility, citizenship and democracy are addressed. The analysis of the teaching materials reveals a strong focus on the individual’s responsibility for obesity, formulated through explicit prescriptions and recommendations on how to think and act in everyday life. The implication is that the individual is made into the key actor in solving the problem of obesity. This predominantly individual perspective on solutions is problematic since a strictly individual perspective obscures the political dimension of obesity. Furthermore, the individualization and depoliticization of obesity in teaching materials contribute to and reinforces an ongoing erosion of citizenship and democracy.
Uwe K Simon
added a research item
The current COVID-19 pandemic shows how little many people know about viruses. Yet apart from COVID-19, the world has observed epidemic spread of another SARS virus, of the Ebola virus, and of the Zika virus during the last two decades. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is still one of the most dangerous viruses worldwide. Some types of the human papillomavirus (HPV) are the main cause of cervical cancer. Cases of measles, also caused by a virus, increase in numbers due to lack of access to or refusal of vaccination. Furthermore, there is the widespread belief that viruses are similar to bacteria and may thus be fought off with antibiotics. Yet viruses have no metabolism. Thus, antibiotics cannot work against them, but may instead cause more harm than help, given side effects such as killing beneficial bacteria (e.g., in the intestine). Second, misuse of antibi-otics is one key factor in the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains – a strong public health issue nowadays. This article informs readers what viruses are, how they are distinct from bacteria, how they may have evolved, and how diseases they cause may be prevented. Additionally, insights from studies concerning students’ virus-related knowledge are summarized.
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues
The time has come: the ESERA 2021 conference will open its virtual doors in a week!
We are happy to point out that at this ESERA conference, our SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health is present with four symposia "powered by SIG 4".
Please find more information in the attached file below,
We are looking forward to seeing you there
Albert Zeyer
Kerstin Kremer, co-coordinators of Sig 4 Science|Environment|Health
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
As you may remember, in last May, Kerstin Kremer and I launched a call for the successor of Albert Zeyer as a co-coordinator of ESERA Special Interest Group Nr. 4 Science|Environment|Health (deadline 30.6.2021).
It is with pleasure that we would like to inform now, that we have one application for the position. Julia Arnold (CV attached), a member of the SIG since 2016 and present in many conferences, mini-conferences and symposia, has a profound research background in the field, is familiar with the structure and the aims of our SIG, and seems to be a very suitable candidate. Kerstin Kremer is looking forward to coordinating the SIG together with her.
As Julia Arnold is the only applicant for the position, we are suggesting that she will be elected at the ESERA conference 2021 member session by acclamation.
Official members of the ESERA SIG 4 who do not agree with this suggested procedure are kindly requested to contact Albert Zeyer (albert.zeyer@gmail.com) or Kerstin Kremer (kremer@idn.uni-hannover.de) no later than by the 22th of August.
Best regards,
Albert Zeyer
Kerstin Kremer, co-coordinators of ESERA SIG 4
 
Kerstin Kremer
added a research item
Background Biodiversity is being lost rapidly and its conservation is thus one of the most urgent tasks today. For biodiversity conservation to be successful, the public needs to gain an awareness and understanding of biodiversity and its importance. Moreover, species experts are needed who have the skills necessary for identifying and recording biodiversity. Previous research showed that citizen science projects can contribute to educating the public about biodiversity. However, it is still unclear how project characteristics connect to participants’ knowledge and skills and how citizen science projects should be designed if they are to foster participants’ learning. Aim We aimed to investigate specific characteristics of biodiversity citizen science projects that could potentially influence participants’ learning. We explored the following project characteristics from both the project coordinators’ and the participants’ perspectives: information and training provided to participants, social interaction among participants, contact between participants and staff, and feedback and recognition provided to participants. Methods and results In order to examine the extent to which these project characteristics are connected to participants’ gains in knowledge and skills, we conducted a comprehensive study across 48 biodiversity citizen science projects in Europe and Australia. We found that participants’ perceived gains in knowledge and skills were significantly related to the five project characteristics as reported by the participants: information received by the participants, training received by the participants, social interaction among participants, contact between participants and staff, and feedback and recognition received by the participants. Conclusion We conclude that by deliberately designing citizen science projects to include features such as interaction and feedback, these projects could achieve higher learning outcomes for the participants. Thereby, suitable modes of communication between projects and their participants are crucial. We provide specific suggestions for the design of biodiversity citizen science projects and for future research on project characteristics and participant outcomes.
Kerstin Kremer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
August, 21.-23. August 2022 is from our today perspective the best accepted time for our next-coming Obergurgl ESERA SIG 4 S|E|H Miniconference 2022
Suzanne fixed the time at the Obergurgl University Center and we all hope to get in touch in present life at this time in the next year. Suzanne Kapelari and her team from Innbruck University will keep you informed about the schedule of the meeting.
All the best for you all and hoping to meet up virtually at the next Esera Conference.
Kind regards
Kerstin Kremer and Albert Zeyer
 
Kerstin Kremer
added an update
Dear Colleagues from the ESERA SIG 4 S|E|H,
As you remember, we had to postpone our last year’s S|E|H Mini Conference 2020 in Obergurgl due to the pandemic restrictions. Our plan was to schedule this meeting in 2022 again in form of a Mini Conference in between the two ESERA main conferences.
Luckily, Suzanne Kapelari and her team from Innbruck University are so kind to host our gathering once again at the beautiful University Center Obergurgl in the breath-taking Ötztal Alps. The location is very popular, which is why Suzanne has to fix the date with the University center as soon as possible. That is why Albert and I agreed upon a survey about a range of possible dates at the end of August or begin of September 2022. We would like to ask you to inform us about your preferred date(s) in this survey until mid of June, 2021.
Please let us know in the comment field about possible overlaps with other events. We prefer, as it is already good tradition, to have the conference at the last weekend in August, if possible for the most of the interested colleagues.
As soon as we agreed about the best possible date, we will inform you about the details of the schedule and recommendations from the Innsbruck organizer team.
Looking forward to meeting you all in virtual ways over this year and hopefully in person again in 2022 in Obergurgl!
Kind regards
Kerstin Kremer & Albert Zeyer
 
Kerstin Kremer
added 3 research items
Antibiotika sind bei bakteriellen Erkrankungen oft ein Retter in der Not. Gleichzeitig stehen sie immer wieder in Kritik- sei es aufgrund der Nebenwirkungen oder der Resistenzbildung. Neben einem historischen Rückblick beleuchtet die Produktion die wichtigsten Angriffspunkte von Antibiotika bei Bakterien. Weitere Schwerpunkte sind die Problematik der Resistenzbildung sowie die rückläufige Antibiotikaforschung.
Objectives: We applied the concept of psychological distance to understand the perceived affection by COVID-19 and investigated its connection with protective behaviour (RQ1), context-specific antecedents (RQ2), and its possibility to mediate the effect of knowledge on attitudes (RQ3). Design: We conducted a quantitative cross-sectional study (N = 395, Mage = 32.2 years, SDage = 13.9 years, 64.3% female) in Germany in July 2020, a time with a low incidence of people infected with Sars-CoV2. Methods: People completed online questionnaires about socio-psychological constructs addressing COVID-19, further information was included from external sources. Results: Geographical distance only predicted cognitive attitudes towards COVID-19 (β = -0.25, p < 0.001), hypothetical distance (i.e. feeling to be likely affected by COVID-19) predicted participants' affective, cognitive, and behavioural attitudes (-0.16 < β <-0.28) and the installation of a warning-app (β = -0.18, p < 0.01). Geographical distance to COVID-19 was predicted by living in cities and knowledge. Hypothetical distance was affected by Sars-CoV2 cases in social surrounding, knowledge, and level of education. Hypothetical and geographical distance mediated the effect of knowledge on attitudes. Conclusions: While geographical distance affected peoples' cognitive evaluation of COVID-19, hypothetical distance predicted the evaluation and the implementation of protective behaviours. Since Sars-CoV2 affects spatial regions differently, there is a need for addressing the likelihood of infecting oneself with COVID-19, which may be an objective for formal and informal educational activities. However, the success of these activities depends on peoples' geographical and hypothetical distance, given their mediating role between knowledge and attitudes. The full text is freely available on PsyArxiv: https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/3n5pt
Professional societies and institutes have stressed the importance of a dialogue between scientists and the public over the past decades. Especially the life sciences include many highly relevant research topics pertaining not only to scientific progress but also to decision-making in society. Surprisingly, few educational researchers and biological scientists make interdisciplinary efforts to communicate life science topics to society in an adequate manner. In our project, scientists from evolutionary biology, medicine and biology education worked in an interdisciplinary manner to design an educational program to make scientific research on antibiotic resistance and cystic fibrosis accessible to students (ninth, tenth and eleventh graders). In this article, we explain the communication objectives from the science education researcher's and the life scien-tist's perspectives. We provide a systematic description of the co-design process, a step-by-step procedure and the link to the open-source-materials used in the course. We conclude with a reflection about the implementation in consideration of the two perspectives. In sum, our results highlight that the co-design approach provides an effective method of communicating current biomedical research to school students. Our description of the co-design-process can help future applications of this co-design approach when designing science outreach activities.
Uwe K Simon
added an update
Uwe K. Simon; An Instant Update on Viruses. The American Biology Teacher 1 March 2021; 83 (3): 147–153. doi: https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2021.83.3.147
(New article summarizing some key facts about viruses to heed when teaching biology at school or in pre-service biology teacher education.)
 
Kerstin Kremer
added a research item
Citizen science (CS) is regarded as a promising format in environmental and sustainability education as well as in science education. CS projects often assume that participation in the project influences, for example, participants' knowledge or behaviour. We investigated whether and to what extent biodiversity citizen science (BDCS) projects, from the participants' self‐reported perspective, achieve the following six participant outcomes: (a) content, process and nature of science knowledge, (b) skills of science inquiry, (c) self‐efficacy for science and the environment, (d) interest in science and the environment, (e) motivation for science and the environment and (f) behaviour towards the environment. For this purpose, we conducted an online survey of 1,160 CS participants across 63 BDCS projects in Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Our survey was aimed at adults participating in CS voluntarily. Survey respondents reported positive changes in all six categories. The most notable result across projects was that self‐reported increases in knowledge, self‐efficacy, interest and motivation were found to be more pronounced when regarding the environment rather than science. Perceived gains in data collection skills were reported to be higher than gains in skills not directly connected to data collection. Reported behaviour changes primarily concerned communication activities, to a lesser degree also gardening activities, and finally more general environmental behaviour. In addition to these six participant outcomes, respondents mentioned a variety of other positive and negative outcomes, for example, health and well‐being, enjoyment, a sense of satisfaction, an increased connection to people and nature but also a more pessimistic view regarding the future of the environment. We conclude that BDCS projects could have a high potential for environmental and sustainability education as well as science education. Further research should investigate individual participant outcomes in more depth and should focus on the factors that influence these participant outcomes. Moreover, exploring the perspectives of both project participants and project coordinators would be valuable. In this way, it would be possible to improve the development and design of CS projects. As a result, BDCS projects could more effectively achieve outcomes for the participants, for science and for biodiversity. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article. A free Plain Language Summary can be found within the Supporting Information of this article.
Jesper Sjöström
added a research item
The aim of this theoretical paper is to develop and present a didaktik model that embeds chemistry education into Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) using an eco-reflexive approach. A didaktik model is a tool to help educators make decisions and reflect on why, what, how, and/or when to teach. The model presented here is a revised version of the Jegstad and Sinnes model from 2015. It was systematically developed based on a critical analysis of the previous ESD (Education for Sustainable Development)-based model. This process is part of what is called didactic modeling. The revised model consists of the following six categories: (i) socio-philosophical framing; (ii) sustainable schooling and living; (iii) critical views on chemistry’s distinctiveness and methodological character; (iv) powerful chemical content knowledge; (v) critical views of chemistry in society; and (vi) eco-reflexivity through environmental and sustainability education. As in the model by Jegstad and Sinnes, the eco-reflexive didaktik model seeks to support chemistry educators in their sustainability-oriented educational planning and analysis, but from a more critical perspective. Based on an eco-reflexive Bildung approach, one additional category—socio-philosophical framing—was added to the revised model. This is because the previous model does not take sufficient account of worldview perspectives, cultural values, and educational philosophy. The eco-reflexive didaktik model is illustrated with boxes, and it is suggested that all categories in these boxes should be considered in holistic and eco-reflexive chemistry education. The purpose of such education is to develop students’ ChemoKnowings.
Kirsten Schlueter
added 3 research items
Im Zuge des demographischen Wandels nimmt die ältere Generation in der Gesellschaft eine immer größer werdende Rolle ein. Die Betrachtung von Altersbildern ist ein möglicher Schritt, um herauszufinden, wie Schüler_innen auf die demographischen Veränderungen vorbereitet werden. Der vorliegende Beitrag stellt eine Analyse von Lehrmitteln des Sachunterrichts der Primarstufe und des Biologie- und Politikunterrichtes der Sekundarstufe I vor. Insgesamt wurden 66 deutschsprachige Lehrmittel aus dem Bundesland Nordrhein-Westfalen in die Untersuchung einbezogen. Die darin enthaltenen Texte und Illustrationen von älteren Menschen wurden hierbei im Hinblick auf das Erscheinungsbild, die psychische Verfassung und das Sozialverhalten analysiert, um das vermittelte Altersbild in der Schulbuchliteratur näher zu beschreiben.
Issues related to old age and ageing are an imperative topic in a society of long life, concerning everyone. Wherever possible, the age-related issues should also be adequately addressed and integrated into school education. This article gives an overview of perceptions of students in regard to external and self-images of old age, as conceptions from students are an important starting point for the development of teaching approaches. So far, there is an insufficient research situation in Germany regrading images of old age of children and adolescents. Guideline supported individual interviews with ten ninth graders (Mage=15.2 years) were conducted and analyzed in order to get an insight into prevalent conceptions of old age and ageing in this age cohort. The students’ ideas result in a comprehensive category system. In summary our investigation has shown that students do not hold one-sided positive or negative images of old age in general, although some aspects like the physical condition and exercise capacity are seen more negatively than for example the characteristics of older persons. Teaching approaches for biology lessons and other subjects, deducted from the students´ perceptions, are given in the discussion.
The Conceptual Model Map (CMM) presented here is intended to show the connections between different theories and constructs in the field of health and nutrition behavior (including literacy models, the knowledge-attitude(s)-practice(s) survey structure (KAP), behavior change theories, and Maslow's pyramid of needs). The CMM can be used as a map to locate existing and future studies, to show their range of effect as well as their limitations. In this context, the CMM also reveals reasons for the attitude/intention-behavior gap.
Kirsten Schlueter
added an update
Dear colleagues,
On December 4 and 5, our 14th Winter Meeting on Health, Environment and Education will take place. It will be an online event hosted by the Duquesne University in Pittsburgh this year. Enclosed you will find the program with the registration link. Participation in the conference is free of charge.
You might also be interested to have a look at our HEE-Journal, which is related to the Winter Meeting, but also accepts publications independently of conference participation.
With kind regards,
Kirsten Schlüter
(University of Cologne, Institute of Biology Education)
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
It is our pleasure to inform you that our call for SIG 4 symposia on the 4.10.2020 has resulted in four proposals for symposia powered by SIG 4:
1. The invited SIG 4 symposium:
Scientific Holism in a new Science|Environment|Health pedagogy
(Albert Zeyer and Kerstin Kremer)
2. Addressing risk in science education - Contemporary approaches to Science|Environment|Health through the lenses of risk
(Benedikt Heuckmann and Markus Grace)
3. Social Media and Science|Environment|Health: Defining and Developing Competencies for Contemporary Science Education
(Alexander Büssing)
4. (Closed) Determinants of the Ability to Reflect and Act on Health Matters (DARAHM) – a model from the perspective of biology education
(Julia Arnold, Sara Dannemann, Steffen Schaal)
While the fourth symposium is already closed for contributions, the first three are now calling for your submissions.
Please find the three calls attached to this eMail. If you are interested to join one of the symposia, kindly submit your letter of intent to the eMail address indicated in each call.
The deadline for submissions to all the calls is the 6st of December 2020. Our decision will be by mid of December 2020, in order that rejected submissions can still be submitted to the general ESERA 2021 conference submission process.
Please note that the deadline of the 6th of December is relatively tight. However, at present, we only expect your letters of intent (200 words). There will be enough time yet to extend these letters to full proposals that will also have to pass the ESERA review process.
We all are looking forward to receiving your letters of intent.
All the best,
The SIG 4 co-coordinators
Albert Zeyer
Kerstin Kremer
 
Alexander Büssing
added an update
Dear colleagues,
As one of the organizers of our virtual conference I wanted to give a short update about our activities. On the 31.08.2020 the special interest group (SIG) Science|Environment|Health gathered for its first virtual conference hosted by the Institute for Science Education, Leibniz University Hannover.
After a short introduction by the SIG coordinators Prof. Dr. Albert Zeyer and Prof. Dr. Kerstin Kremer , I had the honour to start the program wiith a short plenary talk about "Social media and Science | Environment | Health: platforms, pedagogy and open problems“. In this talk I presented research examples about how social media platforms may be important for informal learning about environmental issues, which was also discussed afterwards.
After a short break Dr. Benedikt Heuckmann (Leibniz University Hannover) proceeded with a second plenary talk about "Understanding complexity in Science|Environment|Health by promoting risk literacy and risk perception?“. The conceptual input highlighted the importance of understanding risk to navigate through complex SEH issues.
The scientific program of the short conference was finished with five short communications by Justin Dillon, Nuria Álvaro, Julia Magdalena Nagy, Isabel Martins, and Miriam Struchiner. All presentations illustrated the rich diversity in research approaches and participating countries of our SIG. We as the organizers and speakers had a good time with the virtual meeting and very much enjoyed the inspiring presentations and discussions. We believe it would be possible to establish this format as one way to stay in contact in the time between the ESERA-conferences and our personal meetings. Furthermore, we want to foster virtual meetings as a sustainable way of working together, especially when small groups may work on specific topics.
Please let us know if you liked the conference. Feel free to send us feedback and inputs. Would you attend another virtual conference, even if the covid-19 pandemic is overcome? Let us know in the comments!
We are thankful to all participants and everyone who made this meeting possible!
Best wishes Alexander Büssing, Benedikt Heuckmann (conference organizers) Albert Zeyer, Kerstin Kremer (SIG4 Coordinators)
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
The SIG 4 is growing, and such are our plans for SIG 4 activities at the next ESERA conference 2021.
Besides an invited symposium (Working title: "Coping with uncertainty in complex contexts - the concept of scientific holism", chair Albert Zeyer, discussant Kerstin Kremer), and a second SIG 4 symposium (Working title: "S|E|H and the hard sciences", chair Kerstin Kremer, discussant Albert Zeyer), we were informed about plans for further symposia in the S|E|H field.
In order to coordinate these activities, Kerstin Kremer and I, as the SIG 4 co-coordinators, have decided to release the following call :
If you are thinking of a symposium at ESERA 2021 hosted by the SIG 4, then please apply to us, albert.zeyer@phlu.ch, no later than by the 31st of October 2020.
Please write a short letter of intent, wherein you indicate:
  • The title of the symposium
  • The chair and the discussant of the symposium (these need not to be SIG 4 members)
  • A short description of the content
  • How the symposium relates to the SIG 4 area of interest
We will then decide which of these symposia will be approved by the SIG 4. These symposia will include the label hosted by SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health and they will enjoy the full SIG 4 support concerning organization, promotion and publication.
Here are further milestones of the organizational process:
Mid of November: The calls for all the SIG 4 symposia will be released.
Mid of December: a virtual meeting with all the contributors to SIG 4 symposia is planned.
15.1.2020: Submission deadline for ESRERA 2021 contributions
We are looking forward to your submissions.
Best regards,
The SIG 4 co-coordinators
Albert Zeyer
Kerstin Kremer
 
Olga Mayoral
added 28 research items
The Proceedings of ESERA 2017 is an electronic publication for revised and extended papers presented at the ESERA 2017 conference in Dublin, Ireland during the 21-25 August, 2017. All papers in the eProceedings correspond to communications submitted and accepted for the ESERA 2017 conference. All proposals to the conference went through a blind review by two or three reviewers prior to being accepted to the conference. A total of 1246 proposals (out of which 86 were symposia) were presented at the conference and in total 243 papers are included in the eProceedings. The authors were asked to produce updated versions of their papers and take into account the discussion that took place after the presentation and the suggestions received from other participants at the conference. On the whole, the eProceedings presents a comprehensive overview of ongoing studies in Science Education Research in Europe and beyond. This book represents the current interests and areas of emphasis in the ESERA community at the end of 2017. The eProceedings book contains eighteen parts that represent papers presented across 18 strands at the ESERA 2017 conference. Part 18 presents papers contributed by ESERA 2016 and 2017 summer school participants that presented at the ESERA 2017 conference. The stand chairs for ESERA 2017 co-edited the corresponding part for each strand 1 to 17 and part 18 was co-edited by the host of the 2016 and 2017 ESERA Summer schools and the coordinating member of ESERA Executive Board. All formats of presentation (single oral, interactive poster, ICT demonstration/workshop and symposium) used during the conference were eligible to be submitted to the eProceedings. The co-editors carried out a review of the updated versions of the papers that were submitted after the conference at the end of 2017. ESERA, the editors and co-editors do not necessarily endorse or share the ideas and views presented in or implied by the papers included in this book. The appropriate APA style for referencing this eProceedings is as follows:
Kerstin Kremer
added a research item
Zusammenfassung de Beim Darwin‐Tag an der Universität zu Kiel bieten Wissenschaftler/innen Lernenden der Sekundarstufe II einen Einblick in aktuelle biologische Forschungsgebiete. 2018 vermittelte die ganzheitliche Betrachtung eines Metaorganismus Schüler/innen neue naturwissenschaftliche Denk‐ und Arbeitsweisen, die für ein tiefgreifendes Verständnis biologischer Zusammenhänge wie auch für heutige Krankheitsbilder wichtig sind. Damit neue Erkenntnisse aus der biologischen Forschung an Schüler/innen herangetragen werden, können verschiedene Formate der Wissenschaftskommunikation genutzt werden. Eine Möglichkeit sind Besuche von außerschulischen Lernorten wie des Darwin‐Tags der Universität zu Kiel, der Bezug zu einem aktuellen biologischen Forschungsthema nimmt. Um die Bedeutung von Wissenschaftskommunikation zu verdeutlichen, wurden in diesem Artikel der Darwin‐Tag und eine begleitende Unterrichtseinheit vorgestellt. Darüber hinaus werden Einblicke in die Evaluierung dieses Outreach‐Formates gegeben. Summary en The Darwin Day: modern science meets school During the Darwin Day at the University of Kiel high school students are introduced to recent research fields in modern biology. In 2018 the holistic view of a metaorganism offered the students new scientific ways of thinking and working, which are important for a profound understanding of biological interrelations as well as current clinical disorders. In order to bring new insights from biological research and modern science to school, different formats of science communication can be used. One possibility is the visit of extracurricular learning opportunities such as the Darwin Day at the University of Kiel. By linking current biological research with an out‐of‐school learning place, the importance of science communication can be illustrated. For this purpose, the Darwin Day and an accompanying teaching unit are presented in this article. Furthermore, insights into the evaluation of this outreach format are given.
Kerstin Kremer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
Some time ago we agreed all about having a virtual mini intermediate conference in this year and to move our planned meeting in Innsbruck to the next possible date in 2022.
Now we are glad to introduce you to our program for August 31th 2020. We want to start our digital meeting at 09:00 CEST. Please find attached to this e-mail a short summary of our schedule. We are very happy about two plenary talks of two members (Alexander Büssing and Benedikt Heuckmann). Additionally, we plan to integrate short (five minute) inputs from all participating members.
For the digital-only meeting we will use Cisco WebEX to meet in digital rooms. If you plan to attend the conference please contact Alexander Büssing (buessing@idn.uni-hannover.de). Please state in an e-mail also if you will contribute something, so we can integrate your contribution into the program.
After your e-mail you will then receive an e-mail for registration. Within the registration e-mail you register yourself (only name and mail needed) and will then get another mail with the URL for the meeting and a password.
On the conference day, we will meet in this room from 09:00 until 13:30 with the proposed activities.
If you have any questions always feel free to ask us or the organization committee (buessing@idn.uni-hannover.de; heuckmann@idn.uni-hannover.de).
The SIG 4 co-coordinators
Kerstin Kremer & Albert Zeyer
 
Alexander Büssing
added a research item
Enjoyment for teaching represents one of the most frequently reported teaching emotions and positively affects student outcomes. Therefore, researchers and teacher educators need to understand its nature and underlying appraisal processes to prepare motivated teachers as part of initial teacher education. Using cross-sectional questionnaire data from 189 German biology preservice teachers (73.5% female, meanage = 23.45 years, SDage = 3.71 years), we empirically tested the topic-specific structure and antecedents of participants’ anticipated enjoyment for teaching. We adapted the established Teacher Emotion Scale to measure preservice teachers’ trait-based enjoyment for teaching by reframing the items with the environmental socioscientific issues of the return of wild wolves and climate change and the health socioscientific issue of preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the best fit of a topic-specific model. We also found different correlations for the anticipated enjoyment for teaching about the issues, but no significant differences in means. Concerning further topic-specific antecedents, the environmentally oriented basic value of universalism predicted the anticipated enjoyment for teaching about the return of wolves, and the socially oriented universal value of benevolence predicted the anticipated enjoyment for teaching about preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Both values inconsistently predicted the anticipated enjoyment for teaching about climate change. While this is in line with the complex nature of this socioscientific issue, psychological distance was a predictor for the anticipated enjoyment for teaching about every topic. While these effects remained stable when controlling for demographic variables, male participants showed a higher anticipated enjoyment for teaching about wolves and about climate change, and female preservice teachers for teaching about preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Further studies are needed to investigate if the results can be transferred to in-service teachers or to other teaching emotions. Furthermore, future studies could examine effects on other factors relevant to teaching emotions such as reactions to student behavior, which have been described as central for the causation of teaching emotions in prior studies (i.e., “reciprocal model of teaching emotions”). The present study stimulates such new studies and adds important knowledge to the understanding of topic specificity and topic-specific antecedents of anticipated enjoyment for teaching, which are relevant for teacher education and professional development.
Olga Mayoral
added a research item
Although wetlands provide an important range of environmental, social and economic services, they are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic perturbations, amongst which invasion by alien plants is particularly alarming. This paper focuses on the alien flora of wetlands from three territories belonging to the western Mediterranean area: one continental (Valencian Community) and two insular (Balearic Islands and Sardinia), providing a complete checklist for the three territories and a general comparison. In total, 380 alien taxa from 89 families have been reported, being the Valencian Community the area richer in taxa (312), followed by the Balearic Islands (151) and Sardinia (134). The invasive component includes 77 taxa, of which nine are common to the three territories-and have been recognised as the most invasive ones in Mediterranean islands-and six are considered invasive worldwide (Ailanthus altissima, Arundo donax, Cortaderia selloana, Oxalis pes-caprae, Ricinus communis and Eichhornia crassipes). Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) revealed that the three territories do not show statistically relevant differences in relation to the alien species present in wetlands and their characteristics. The information on the characteristics of plants in similar habitats of the same biogeographic region provides a portrait of the current dimensions of the phenomenon in Western Mediterranean wetlands and is especially useful from the management perspective: its predictive value can be applied in establishing a prioritization of control measures of those most invasive species and will help screening new introductions with invasive potential.
Julia Caroline Arnold
added 2 research items
Global biosphere issues call for an education for sustainable consumption decisions. Enabling adolescent learners to form sustainable consumption intentions involves an understanding of underlying internal predictors. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) delivers a useful approach to this challenge. Understanding of the underlying motives behind sustainable consumption decision-making, however, requires knowledge and evaluation of three basic sustainability aspects, the generational, the coherence, and the spatial aspect. As yet, the TPB framework does not take account of those facets. In this paper, we propose an extension of the TPB that meets these shortcomings by integrating the sustainability aspects while including the concepts of sustainability knowledge and sustainability values into the existing model. Furthermore, we extended the functional range of the attitude construct to the three sustainability aspects. The objective of the present article is to introduce and discuss the adapted framework which can serve as a first step for an educational implementation of the concept of sustainable consumption.
Wie entstehen Schatten? Wie wird Licht reflektiert? Wie ist das menschliche Auge aufgebaut und wie funktioniert es? Wie funktionieren Lupen und Linsen? Und was sehen Tiere? Diesen Fragen können Schülerinnen und Schüler des 2. Zyklus (3.-6. Klasse) mit Hilfe der Experimentierkiste «Optische Phänomene» forschend nachgehen.
Alexander Büssing
added a research item
As some nature experiences, such as viewing wild animals, may be difficult to implement in science education, immersive virtual reality (VR) technologies have become a promising tool in education. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the effectiveness of nature experiences in VR. In this study, 50 German university students (M = 23.76 years, SD = 3.73 years) from diverse disciplines were randomly assigned to an immersive (head-mounted display; Oculus Quest) or a nonimmersive setting (external computer screen; desktop computer) and individually watched two 360 • videos from the social media site YouTube about wolves in their natural habitat. Besides measuring participants' attitudes towards wolves, we investigated their feeling of presence in the virtual environments with the Spatial Presence Experience Scale (SPES) and the retrospective emotions of interest, joy, and fear with the Differential Affect Scale (M-DAS). The immersive head-mounted display induced higher levels of presence and interest compared to the nonimmersive external computer screen. While higher interest in the screen setting was associated with more positive attitudes towards wolves, such a correlation could not be found in the head-mounted display setting. Thus, our study found that immersive technology could induce interest in a nature experience related to the tested socio-scientific issue, even among people who did not already hold positive attitudes toward the issue. Overall, our findings suggest that 360 • videos using immersive technology provide nature experiences with positive affective learning outcomes, even though the study focused on nature experiences in VR and was not an educational experience per se. As we were unable to assess the role of novelty of VR experiences, the application of VR technologies and its effects in larger teaching and learning settings needs to be evaluated in further studies.
Jesper Sjöström
added a research item
The current research on systems thinking criticizes the additive nature of green chemistry (GC) not being supportive of systems thinking to achieve holism in its practices. This paper argues that systems thinking should comprise of the social issues, and, therefore, it studies renowned papers by GC pioneers and reviews on the field regarding how they address the social dimension of sustainability. It points out how GC has ignored social sustainability in its discourses, practices, and evaluations, leading to a reductionist interpretation of sustainability. Then, this paper presents some challenges to be overcome in order to achieve balanced sustainability. A systemic chemical thinking is advocated, considering chemistry in culture and chemistry as culture, expanding the chemistry rationality from ontological and technological dimensions into the epistemological and ethical ones. It is then discussed how chemistry education can help to promote sustainability in a broad and systemic way.
Julia Caroline Arnold
added 2 research items
Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, e.g., type 2 diabetes) are a burden to humanity and hence addressed in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) (target 3.4). One way of tackling NCDs is by health education as part of science education. Yet, the role of knowledge for health-promoting actions, and thus, the role of science teaching in health education, is not sufficiently clarified. Therefore, the author proposes to differentiate three knowledge types: System Health Knowledge (SK), Action-related Health Knowledge (AK), and Effectiveness Health Knowledge (EK). Accordingly, we designed a questionnaire that asked students to evaluate different questions about sugar consumption and type 2 diabetes according to their relevance for deciding their future sugar consumption. We found that students considered all questions as rather important (3-4.3, out of 5) with an assigned mean importance for SK with a mean of 3.8, for AK with a mean of 4.0, and for EK with a mean of 3.9. This research indicates that knowledge is important for decision-making and that all three types of knowledge should be recognized in health education.
Dieser Beitrag ist unter folgender Adresse erschienen: https://www.vbio.de/aktuelles/neuer-arbeitskreis-gesundheit-und-biologie-im-vbio/ Empfehlungen zur biologischen Bildung in Schule und Hochschule in Zeiten der Corona-Pandemie Die Corona-Pandemie hat den Alltag aller Menschen innerhalb kürzester Zeit gravierend verändert. Bildungseinrichtungen im deutschsprachigen Raum sind von der Ausbreitung des neuartigen Coronavirus (SARS CoV-2) und der damit verbundenen Erkrankung (Covid-19) betroffen. Ein Normalbetrieb erscheint in Schulen und Hochschulen sowie außerschulischen Bildungseinrichtungen daher auch auf lange Sicht hin nicht möglich zu sein. Biologische Bildung ist ein wesentlicher Teil der Allgemeinbildung, auf den in diesen Zeiten nicht verzichtet werden kann (vgl. auch die Stellungnahme des AK Gesundheit und Biologie 2020). Sie unterstützt junge Menschen dabei, gesundheitsbezogene Informationen zur Corona-Pandemie ausfindig zu machen, zu verstehen, zu beurteilen und zu nutzen, um die eigene Gesundheit und die Gesundheit Anderer zu erhalten. Dafür sind das Verständnis von biologischen Kernideen zur Virologie, Immunbiologie, und Epidemiologie, aber auch von den verschiedenen Dimensionen von Gesundheit sowie ein adäquates Wissenschaftsverständnis wesentlich. Biologische Kernideen zum Thema Corona-Pandemie Die nachfolgenden Kernideen wurden für Lehrende der Biologie-und Naturwissenschaften an schulischen und außerschulischen Bildungseinrichtungen zusammengestellt. Sie sind Ergebnis einer Elementarisierung, wobei die Zusammenstellung nicht abschließend ist. Die Komplexität und der Umfang der thematisierten Inhalte können adressatenbezogen variiert werden.
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
In place of the cancelled SIG4 mini conference in Obergurgel, Austria, we plan to meet in a virtual meeting on 31st of August 2020.
With this eMail, we just would like to draw your attention to this event and kindly ask you to save the date in your agenda. Concerning the structure and the schedule, we will keep you informed and send an invitation in due time.
We plan to keep this virtual meeting small and beautiful, and not to overstretch your virtual patience! Ideas and contributions from your side are ever welcome and collected at albert.zeyer@phlu.ch.
The SIG4 co-coordinators
Kerstin Kremer and Albert Zeyer
 
Julia Caroline Arnold
added a research item
Das folgende Dokument ist unter https://www.vbio.de/aktuelles/neuer-arbeitskreis-gesundheit-und-biologie-im-vbio/ erschienen. Die Corona-Pandemie hat unseren Alltag in kürzester Zeit gravierend verändert. Auch wenn die Maßnahmen zur Verlangsamung der Ausbreitung des neuartigen Coronavirus (SARS CoV-2) und der damit verbundenen Erkrankung (Covid-19) aktuell zur Diskussion stehen-die Ausnahmesituation wird noch länger fortbestehen. Es handelt sich um eine weltweite Krise erheblichen Ausmaßes und die Herausforderungen für unsere Gesellschaft sind enorm. Wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse werden zwar im öffentlich-rechtlichen Fernsehen, über behördliche Internetplattformen oder über Akteur*innen der Wissenschaft in den sozialen Medien in vielerlei Hinsicht angemessen kommuniziert. Für viele Menschen ist es allerdings auch schwer, Informationen zum neuartigen Coronavirus und der dadurch verursachten Erkrankung zu verstehen und einzuordnen. Dabei sind grundlegende biologische Kenntnisse über virale Infektionen, systemisches Denken, mathematisches Verständnis sowie die Fähigkeit, Informationsquellen einschätzen zu können, wesentlich, um die aus den Perspektiven der Wissenschaften und Politik notwendigen Maßnahmen beurteilen zu können. Gleichzeitig können Maßnahmen dem psychologischen Grundbedürfnis von Menschen, sich mit Anderen zu treffen, sich auszutauschen und sozial eingebunden zu sein, diametral entgegenstehen. Auf allen gesellschaftlichen Ebenen-in Politik, Wirtschaft, Wissenschaft und Zivilgesellschaft-liegen bislang keine Lösungen für die aktuelle Situation vor und doch müssen die entstehenden Unsicherheiten ausgehalten und Lösungsansätze auf einer informierten Basis diskutiert werden können. Biologische Bildung stellt für die Auseinandersetzung mit Gesundheitsthemen, wie sie angesichts der Corona-Pandemie deutlich wird, einen zentralen "Kondensationskeim" dar: Ausgehend vom Verständnis biologischer Kernideen zu Immunbiologie, Virologie und Epidemiologie gilt es, generische Fähigkeiten wie das Denken in Systemen, allgemeine Problemlösefähigkeit, Umgang mit Daten und Wahrscheinlichkeit, Vorläufigkeit von wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen und Evidenz oder auch ethische Bewertungen am konkreten Kontext zu entwickeln. Die Verknüpfung dieser Themen-und Handlungsfelder ist eine genuine Aufgabe biologischer Bildung und untrennbar mit der Befähigung zu reflexiven Handlungsentscheidungen verbunden. Aus diesem Grunde sollte der Biologieunterricht in schulischen Bildungsprozessen eine prominente Rolle einnehmen. Er sollte sich aus fachlicher Sicht mit aktuellen gesundheitsrelevanten Themen wie der Corona-Pandemie auseinandersetzen und gehört damit-im Gegensatz zur Einschätzung der Nationalen Akademie der Wissenschaften Leopoldina-mit zu den Kernfächern, auf die in dieser Zeit nicht verzichtet werden kann.
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
We are very sad about cancelling our 2020 SIG4 miniconference in Obergurgel, Austria. Yet, given the present circumstances, it is unlikely that in August, we will be able to enjoy our conference without health risks and travel restrictions.
We therefore have made this decision and think that it is appropriate and responsible. We thank the University of Innsbruck for accepting the cancellation without financial consequences to our SIG. We greatly appreciate this unbureaucratic and helpful response.
Together with Olga Mayoral, University of Valencia, we have decided to postpone the SIG miniconference in Obergurgel to 2022, and then hopefully will be happy to enjoy another conference in 2024 in Valencia. Many thanks to Olga for having agreed spontaneously.
Many thanks to all the people who have helped us in the preliminary steps of the conference preparation. We greatly hope to go on with this preparation in two years' time with a better perspective.
Many thanks to all of you who support our SIG and have thought of enrolling for the miniconference. We hope to see you all again at ESERA conference 2021 at the latest.
All the best,
Suzanne Kapelari and team, conference organizers
Kerstin Kremer, SIG 4 co-coordinator
Albert Zeyer, SIG 4 co-coordinator
PS We were wondering if some of you were interested in a virtual meeting in one of the conference days. If so, and particularly if you have an idea for a personal contribution, please write to albert.zeyer@phlu.ch, wo will collect ideas and intitiatives.
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
as always at the end of a year, we had to summarize the SIG 4 activities 2019 for the ESERA board. It has been a productive year, once again, and we are pleased to share the report here with you.
The SIG 4 co-coordinators:
Albert Zeyer
Kerstin Kremer
SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health activities summary 2019 for the ESERA Board
The present official SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health members includes 81 persons (December 2019).
The second edition of the flag book of the SIG 4 in the Springer Science Education Series:
Zeyer, A., & Kyburz-Graber (Eds.). (2012). Science | Environment | Health. Towards a Renewed Pedagogy for Complex Living Systems. Dordrecht, Boston, London: Springer
is well under way. Presently, the reviews for each of the ten chapters are coming back and will be summarized and extended by the editors. The book is planned to appear in summer 2020.
At the 2019 ESERA conference in Bologna, the SIG 4 hosted successful activities:
1) There was a SIG preconference on Monday 26.8.2019, 9.00 - 12.45. The title was: ScienceIEnvironmentIHealth –Towards a Science Pedagogy of Complex Living Systems. It was dedicated to a workshop on the upcoming chapters of the 2nd edition of our SIG flagbook, and an opportunity to get acquainted and involved with SIG 4 topics and issues.
2) Two SIG 4 symposia were presented:
A) the invited SIG4 symposium:
Title: "Prediction and Adaption in Science|Environment|Health contexts"
Organisator: Albert Zeyer, Switzerland
Discussant: Alla Keselman, US
a) Deidre Bauer, Julia Arnold, Kerstin Kremer, Germany: Students' perceptions about the complexity of sustainability-related consequences of their behavior
b) Nuria Álvaro, Olga Mayoral and Valentín Gavidia, Spain: Development of adaptive didactic resources for decision-making on environmental health problems
c) Iztok Devetak, Sonja Posega Devetak, Tina Vesel Tajnšek, Slovenia: Can pre-service teachers’ perception of allergic students’ quality of life be a predictor of their adaptation in future profession?
d) Albert Zeyer. Prediction and Adaption in complex systems. An introduction.
B) SIG4 Symposium 2
Title: The question of responsibility in Science|Environment|Health
Organisator: Alla Keselman
Discussant: Albert Zeyer
a) Claes Malmberg, Anders Urbas and Tomas Nilson, Sveden: The paradox of responsibilty
b) Julia Arnold, Switzerland: What knowledge do students need in order to form decisions concerning
preventive health actions?
c) Benedikt Heuckmann & Finja Krüger, Germany: The impact of scientific knowledge on university students’ risk perception of a controversial habit
d) Denise Quiroz Martinez, UK: Creating Pedagogies for Sustainability in Chile through Chemistry Education: Benefits and Challenges from Teachers’ Perspectives
At the SIG 4 members meeting in Bologna, the SIG 4 members elected a new SIG 4 co-coordinator. It is Kerstin Kremer, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany.
The 3rd ESERA SIG4 Science|Environment|Health 2020 Mini Conference will take place from Sunday, 30th August until Tuesday, 1st September 2020 at Obergurgl University Center near Innsbruck in Asutria. A particular focus of this mini conference will be research on environmental and health education contributing to a sustainable development on our planet. We especially encourage the attendance from scholars interested in environmental and health science issues in the overarching context of sustainability. We want to exchange formats of outreach and communication and focus on project collaborations. The local organisation team is presided by Suzanne Kapelari, University of Innsbruck, Austria and supported by the coordinators of ESERA SIG
Olga Mayoral, University of Valencia, Spain, plans to invite for the SIG Miniconference 2022 in the University's botanical garden.
There are plans for establishing an international SIG research project, proposed and coordinated by Uwe Simon, University of Graz, Austria.
The publication of a chapter resulting from the invited SIG4 symposium at ESERA 2019 in the Springer conference book of selected papers is planned.
The SIG 4 invited symposium at the 2017 ESERA conference resulted in a publication:
Zeyer, A., Álvaro, N., Arnold, J., Benninghaus, J. C., Hasslöf, H., Kremer, K., Lundström, M., Mayoral, O., Sjöström, J., Sprenger, S., Gavidia, V., & Keselman, A. (2019). Addressing Complexity in Science | Environment | Health Pedagogy. In E. McLoughlin, O. Finlayson, S. Erduran, & P. Childs (Eds.), Contributions from Science Education Research, Selected Papers from the ESERA 2017 Conference (Contributi, p. pp 153-170). Springer.
SIG 4 members published several papers concerning S|E|H issues (list without clame of completeness, assembled from the updates to the researchgate project):
Arnold, J., Dannemann, S., Gropengießer, I., Heuckmann, B., Kahl, L., Schaal, S., Schaal, S., Schlüter, K., Schwanewedel, J., Simon, U., & Spörhase, U. (2019). Modell zur reflexiven gesundheitsbezogenen Handlungsfähigkeit aus biologiedidaktischer Perspektive. Biologie in Unserer Zeit, 49(4), 243–244. https://doi.org/10.1002/biuz.201970410
Benninghaus, J. C., Mühling, A., Kremer, K., & Sprenger, S. (2019). Complexity in Education for Sustainable Consumption — An Educational Data Mining Approach using Mysteries. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030722
Peter, M., Diekötter, T., & Kremer, K. (2019). Participant outcomes of biodiversity citizen science projects: A systematic literature review. Sustainability (Switzerland), 11(10), 1–18. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102780
Rafolt, S., Kapelari, S., & Kremer, K. (2019). Kritisches Denken im naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht – Synergiemodell, Problemlage und DesiderataCritical Thinking in the Science Classroom—Synergy Model, Challenges and Desiderata. Zeitschrift Für Didaktik Der Naturwissenschaften, December. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40573-019-00092-9
Sjöström, J. (2019). Didactic Modelling for Socio-Ecojustice. Journal for Activist Science and Technology Education, 10(1). https://doi.org/10.33137/jaste.v10i1.32916
Zeyer, A. (2019). Getting Involved with Vaccination . Swiss Student Teachers ’ Reactions to a Public Vaccination Debate. 11(23), 1–15. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236644
Zeyer, A., & Dillon, J. (2019a). Science | Environment | Health – the emergence of a new pedagogy of complex living systems. 1–10.
Zeyer, A., & Dillon, J. (2019b). The role of empathy for learning in complex Science|Environment|Health contexts. International Journal of Science Education, 41(3), 297–315. https://doi.org/10.1080/09500693.2018.1549371
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues and SIG 4 friends
The corona virus reminds us that complex systems are inherently unpredictable. Nevertheless, we would like to definitely invite you to the third ESERA SIG4 intermediate conference in Obergurgel near Innsbruck, Austria, from Sunday, 30th August until Tuesday, 1st September 2020. The save the date reminder has been gone out already some time ago.
Please note that a particular focus of this conference will be the relation of Science|Environment|Health to sustainable development.
Furthermore - and taking up the results of the final discussion round at the last mini conference - we plan to experiment with new forms of presentation. People should be able to get to know each other closer during the conference, and to find common research and teaching interests for further cooperation.
To this aim, we invite you either to submit either ideas for round tables or for presentations.
We particularly want to encourage junior researchers to involve with the conference. To this aim, the ESERA helps with a (limited) financial support of their travel costs.
For more, please see the attachments (an information sheet and a registration form).
We are very much looking forward to your registration
The organization committee
Suzanne Kapelari, conference organizer
Kerstin Kremer, SIG 4 co-coordinator
Albert Zeyer, SIG 4 co-coordinator
 
Julia Caroline Arnold
added a research item
Die Förderung von Gesundheitskompetenz ist ein Ziel von Bildung, sowohl überfachlich, fächerübergreifend als auch speziell im Biologieunterricht. Vor dem Hintergrund verschiedener gesellschaftlicher und wissenschaftlicher Entwicklungen wie bspw. einem wachsenden medizinischen Wissen und gleichzeitig einer durch Studien attestierten mangelhaften Gesundheitskompetenz eines Großteils der Gesellschaft, kann der Biologieunterricht einen wertvollen Beitrag zur Erreichung dieses Ziels leisten. Hierbei stellen sich Fragen in Bezug auf Begrifflichkeiten, Zielsetzungen und die inhaltliche und methodische Ausgestaltung, die diskutiert werden müssen, um national biologiedidaktische Forschung und Entwicklung vorantreiben zu können, die international und an andere Fächer bzw. überfachliche Konzepte anschlussfähig sein kann. Im Rahmen eines Round-Table-Gesprächs wurden diese Fragen auf der FDdB-Tagung in Halle aufgegriffen. Im Beitrag werden die gehaltenen Impulsreferate sowie die Ergebnisse der Diskussion zusammengefasst und darauf aufbauend Desiderata für eine Weiterarbeit im Bereich „Biologie und Gesundheit“ formuliert.
Benedikt Heuckmann
added a research item
This study investigated factors influencing teachers' intention and willingness to teach about cancer in the context of the theory of planned behaviour. Because teaching about cancer is mandatory in Germany, we compared n=355 teachers' intention to teach about cancer under mandatory conditions and their willingness to teach about cancer if they had free choice. Teachers signalled strong intention and a strong willingness to teach about cancer. Teachers did not perceive teaching about cancer to be a burden and strongly considered it to be necessary. Structural equation modelling showed that perceived autonomy was the only significant predictor of teachers' intention, whereas attitude towards the perceived necessity to teach about cancer, attitude towards the perceived burden of teaching about cancer and social norm were significant predictors of willingness. We attributed these differences to the observation of a ceiling effect for intention but not for willingness. There were systematic differences among the variables predicting teachers' intention and willingness depending on whether the teachers had personal experience with cancer. Indirect measures yielded insights into which teacher beliefs affected the direct measures. We discuss implications for professional development, such as reducing the burden of teaching about cancer by adequately addressing emotionally-charged classroom situations.
Kerstin Kremer
added a research item
Influence diagrams, derived from the mystery method as its learning output, represent an externalization of systems thinking and are, therefore, valid to research; so far they have not been conceptualized in the research literature for teaching systems thinking in education for sustainable development. In this study, 31 of those diagrams are confronted with (1) three different expert references, in (2) two different ways, by (3) three different scoring systems to determine which evaluation option is both valid and easy to implement. As a benchmark, the diagrams’ diameters are used, which allows statements about the quality of the maps/diagrams in general. The results show that, depending on the combination of variables that play a role in the evaluation (1, 2, 3), the quality of the influence diagram becomes measurable. However, strong differences appear in the various evaluation schemes, which can be explained by each variable’s peculiarities. Overall, the tested methodology is effective, but will need to be sharpened in the future. The results also offer starting points for future research to further deepen the path taken here.
S. Lizette Ramos
added a research item
This paper presents the results of a diagnostic study whose purpose was to document the experiences of children and adolescents who are suffering from chronic kidney disease, as well as the experiences of their mothers. We have identified limits to what can be achieved in formal learning settings, like schools, concerning health educational needs of young children who suffer from chronic diseases, and who are prevented from attending regular school, due to frequent, and sometimes, prolonged hospital admissions to have treatment for their condition. In order to compile the necessary information, we used oral and written narratives, as well as focus groups in which the adolescents and their mothers explain the way them live this processes. For the analysis of the information, we used proposals based on sociocultural and interpretive perspectives. Our results demonstrate that the main difficulties of this group are associated with emotions (sadness, anger, despair), the commitment to the treatment and the process of the acceptance of death. Not less important is their perception of the role of their physician as a provider of normative instructions aimed at controlling their behavior as well as of the risks involved in not following them. The results allow us to identify the elements that should be considered within a strategy for health literacy relevant to the population analyzed.
Claes Malmberg
added a research item
According to previous research, in contemporary western societies health is seen as an increasingly non-political issue. Rather than being at the centre of collective decision-making and democratic politics, health is regarded as resting on individual responsibility. In this study we focus on, and explore an important and challenging socio-scientific issue through the concepts of politicization and the depoliticization. We address the question of health education in schools as well as the question of citizenship and democracy, which adds to research on scientific literacy and socio-scientific issues. The study consists of two parts: firstly, we analyse whether health—more precisely stress—is portrayed as a political or non-political issue in textbooks for secondary school; secondly, and informed by the results from our analysis, we dissect and problematise what kind of citizenship that is constructed in textbooks. From a theoretical framework of politics, the article explores how citizenship emerges. Our findings show that health, and more precisely stress, is depoliticized in the textbooks. Firstly, stress is regarded as an individual—not public or governmental—concern. Secondly, stress is depoliticized in a more rigorous manner by making its political dimensions invisible. A consequence is a displacement of stress, e.g., in school, from the democratic arena to the individual citizen. As an implication we recommend an education that emphasize a political and democratic perspective on health as a complement to the individual perspective.
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health colleagues and friends
Time is passing by and we are already planning the third intermediate SIG 4 conference. Please save the date that we have already decided on together in Bologna:
3rd SIG 4 Intermediate Conference 30.8. to 1.9.2020, Obergurgel near Innsbruck, Austria
We would like to involve you in the conference concept from the very beginning. So here are our questions to you:
1) Do you have ideas/suggestions about the overall theme of the next conference?
2) Your feedback at the last interim conference in Kiel 2018 was to establish more discussion space during the meeting. --> what could be possible formats for this goal?
3) We are wondering if, and how, we should address the pre-dominant discussions on climate change and education all over Europe. --> Is this an issue for our SIG, and should it be thematized in the intermediate conference. If so, do you have ideas/suggestions in which direction this SIG4 activities should go?
Please use the comment button down below in this update to answer these questions. Every feedback from your side is more than welcome and will be considered in the preparation of our intermediate conference.
Feel free to use the share button down below to share this update with colleagues and friends.
We are looking forward to a great meeting in Obergurgel in the final August days of this summer
The SIG 4 co-coordinators
Albert Zeyer, Lucerne (Switzerland)
Kerstin Kremer, Hannover (Germany)
Suzanne Kapelari, Innsbruck, (Austria), conference organizer
 
Albert Zeyer
added a research item
Vaccination is an explicit topic of the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The present article explores a new way of involving student teachers into the vaccination debate. To this aim, 273 students at a Swiss university for teacher education were invited to read a debate between a vaccination proponent and a vaccination opponent that had been published in a free local newspaper. Then, they were asked to judge five of the main arguments of each discussant and to take a (hypothetical) general decision in favor or against vaccination. This decision, the judgements, and students’ comments were investigated with a mixed method approach in order to better understand the students’ needs and to refine the new approach. It was found that the students eagerly took part in the intervention, but that they were very ambivalent concerning the arguments. They could be classified into three groups. Two groups, called the acceptors and the rejectors, supported the proponent and the opponent, respectively, and decided accordingly in favor or against vaccination. However, there remained a considerably large group that was called the hesitators. They were particularly ambivalent towards both types of argumentation, but, as structural equation modelling revealed, they eventually were more influenced by the arguments in favor than by those against vaccination. In their comments, these students wanted to know more about the prevented diseases, and they often referred to their personal experience but not to the experts’ arguments. It was concluded that this group would benefit most from the new type of intervention. A shared-decision approach, as is today prominently discussed in medicine, could improve its impact, and ways should be found to more seriously and consistently include empathetic understanding in pedagogical settings—for example, by adapting the three-step model from medicine or the reflective equilibrium approach from applied ethics.
Benedikt Heuckmann
added a research item
Cancer diseases are pertinent topics to young people, who are confronted with the issue through media or family members that suffer from these diseases. Based on a paper-and-pencil questionnaire, we investigated German high school students' (N = 369, 16-18 years old) interest in and their attitudes towards cancer. Attitude was assessed measuring multiple dimensions that included scales to measure several components: the cognitive (beliefs about the controllability of cancer), the affective (emotional responses towards cancer) and the behavioural (intention for proactive behaviour towards cancer) components. A student assessment of carcinogenic risk factor was executed. Our results suggest that students' willingness to deal with the topic cancer (e.g. to communicate about cancer or to reconsider their lifestyle) is highly dependent on their interest, their emotional responses and their beliefs about the controllability of cancer. Their assessment of carcinogenic risk factors does not have a direct influence on their intentions to behave proactively against cancer but might have an indirect influence on their beliefs about the controllability of cancer. Based on these results, we have drawn teaching implications and discussed which factors should be included in teaching processes in order to stimulate proactive behaviour related to cancer prevention.
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
Elin Kelsey made me aware of the following call for proposals. She wrote:
"I am co-convening a workshop at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich, Germany in July 2020 and I wanted to send you the call for proposals:
with the hopes that you will find it of interest, and might consider applying and might chose to circulate it to your contacts."
It is my pleasure to highly recomend this call, evene more so as it shows much connection to quite some of our SIG issues.
Albert Zeyer
 
Julia Caroline Arnold
added a research item
Der Arbeitskreis „Gesundheit & Biologie“ im VBIO widmet sich der Gesundheitsbildung im Biologieunterricht. Um einen Rahmen für biologiedidaktische Forschungs‐ und Entwicklungstätigkeiten zu bieten, wurde das hier zur Diskussion gestellte dynamische Strukturmodell entwickelt. Mit dem Modell können Zustände und Veränderungen von Individuum und Lebensumfeld dargestellt werden.
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
Researchgate found our article that resulted from the invited symposium at ESERA 2017, and I've added the last manuscript version, which you can also find attached to this update.
It includes many of the complexity issues that were discussed during this week at the SIG 4 meetings, and also provides some systems theoretical background information.
Albert Zeyer
 
Albert Zeyer
added a research item
This paper aims to discuss complexity as a key feature for understanding the role of science knowledge in environmental and health contexts—a central issue in Science|Environment|Health pedagogy. Complex systems are, in principle, not predictable. In different contexts, ephemeral mechanisms produce different, sometimes completely unexpected results. The art of decision-making in complex contexts is to take scientific knowledge into account but to interpret its meaning in terms of concrete complex contexts. This is illustrated by four empirical studies on Science|Environment|Health issues, presented midway through this paper. The findings underscore the importance of introducing complexity issues into science education. Not only are all the grand health and environmental challenges of our times highly complex, but there is also evidence that introducing complexity into science education may support many students’ motivation to learn science and change practice in science classrooms. Truly appreciating the role of complexity in Science|Environment|Health pedagogy is likely to raise future citizens who understand the delicate relation between predictability and adaption and to empower them for wise decisions about societal and personal well-being.
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues,
this update is linked to the pre-conference SIG 4 workshop at the ESERA 2019 conference in Bologna, but open to comments for any reader of this project update.
In the upcoming Springer book that will be discussed in this workshop, it will be my duty and honour to write an introduction and overview about current Science|Environment|Health research.
I'd be happy if you could help me to address, in this overview, your particular research. To this aim, I kindly invite you to write a comment to the present update, in which you inform about some basic thoughts and concerns of your research.
If you are interested to do this, please proceed as follows:
1) Label your input by one of the five categories of S|E|H content that have been identified by Zeyer&Dillon in their preprint 2019 (attached to this update):
  • The role of scientific knowledge in S|E|H
  • Medicine education
  • Complexity and S|E|H
  • the role of empathy in S|E|H contexts
  • Responsibility in S|E|H
  • Other
2) Give a concise statement about your thoughts and concerns that you would like to see in an overview about current S|E|H work.
3) Add reference(s) of your work that can be cited.
This is an experiment that wants to connect people with common interests! I am very much looking forward to the results and absolutely don't now how they will look like :-).
If some of you will join in - provided their contribution is suitable to the book - their statement will be used and their work will be cited in that overview chapter.
Many thanks for your help.
Albert Zeyer
 
Albert Zeyer
added an update
Dear colleagues and friends of the SIG 4 Science|Environment|Health
It is our pleasure to inform you about the SIG 4 activities at the ESERA 2019 conference in Bologna:
1) Preconference workshop: ScienceIEnvironmentIHealth –Towards a Science Pedagogy of Complex Living Systems
--> Monday, 26.8.2019, 9.00-12.30, Room B6
2) Symposium 09: The question of responsibility in Science|Environment|Health
--> Tuesday, 27.8.2019, 9.00-11.00,Room B5
3) SIG 4 Business meeting: New co-coordinator, SIG 4 intermediate conference in Obergurgl, Austria, SIG 4 activities' outlook
--> Tuesday, 27.8.2019, 18.30-19.30, Room B4
4) Invited symposium SIG 4: Prediction and adaption in Science|Environment|Health contexts
--> Thursday, 29.8.2019, 9.00-11.00, Room D2
We are looking forward to seeing you there soon
The SIG 4 co-coordinators
Albert Zeyer
Alla Keselman
 
Uwe K Simon
added a research item
Der Arbeitskreis „Gesundheit & Biologie“ im VBIO widmet sich der Gesundheitsbildung im Biologieunterricht. Um einen Rahmen für biologiedidaktische Forschungs- und Entwicklungstätigkeiten zu bieten, wurde das hier zur Diskussion gestellte dynamische Strukturmodell entwickelt. Mit dem Modell können Zustände und Veränderungen von Individuum und Lebensumfeld dargestellt werden.
Jesper Sjöström
added a research item
The year 2014 marked the end of the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. All educational domains and levels, including science education, were asked contributing to education enabling younger generations to become responsible citizens and promote sustainable development in our world. This chapter gives insights into different models of implementing education for sustainability in the teaching of science and technology illustrated by various cases which have been developed by the University of Bremen chemistry education group in the past. In this chapter, examples are reflected based on different interpretations of scientific literacy and with reference to the concept of Bildung.
Jesper Sjöström
added a research item
In northern Europe and Scandinavia, there is a tradition called Didaktik. It can be seen as both the art of teaching and as the "science for teachers", helping us teachers answering didactic questions about WHY?, WHAT? and HOW? to teach (and support learning). Many areas of subject-specific Didaktik have in recent decades evolved from mainly practice-based methodology to quite independent research areas. This applies, for example, to the field of science-Didaktik (i.e., Science Education). Part of this field has a special interest in educational activities for socio-ecojustice. For instance, it can include complex issues used in teaching to build bridges across different curriculum subjects, among them STEM-subjects, in support of sustainability, reflexive Bildung and socio-political activism. The focus in this paper is on so-called didactic models and modelling aiming at actions for socio-ecojustice. In particular, the paper presents a model for eco-reflexive Didaktik, an example of a didactic model. Didactic modelling is the name for the processes when didactic models are used and developed, often by researchers in collaboration with practitioners. The didactic model in focus here is based on philosophical ideas and orientations, such as holism, critical realism, egalitarianism, altruism, reconstructionism and critical pedagogy.