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Science-i

Goal: Science-i, a transparent and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) web platform for international research collaboration, empowers ensemble research projects of everyone, especially under-represented and under-privileged people from across the world.

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Project log

Jingjing Liang
added an update
Please mark your calendar that our final global webinar (Globinar) is re-scheduled after a team-wide poll:
  • When: November 30th 2022, 9:30-11:00 am Eastern (15:30-17:00 CET, 10:30pm-12:00am Beijing Time)
  • Speaker: Dr. Bianca Lopez, Associate Editor, Science Magazine
  • Topic: Publishing at Science and other top journals
  • Location: Online & @Purdue PFEN 241, Deans Auditorium
“I’ll talk about how the review process works at Science, what we look for in submissions, and touch on ways that we and other publishers are thinking about improving access and inclusion for our authors and readers.”
For details including the meeting link,
 
Jingjing Liang
added an update
We have the following news that is worth highlighting:
  1. We welcome 40 new members who have joined us since July (see our newsletter for their names and countries).
  2. Please join us for our Science-i Global Webinar Series 2022 “Empower the Under-Represented in Forest Science.”
There are two major benefits of participating in this year’s Globinar: 1) Converse and collaborate with our distinguished guest speakers; 2) Coauthor a whitepaper entitled ‘Empower the Under-Represented in Forest Science,‘ to be published in a top academic journal.
Oct 11, Oct 25, Nov 8, Nov 15
  1. We have completed one project. There are eight(8) ongoing projects with open invitations to data contributors and other co-authors.
Please see attached PDF, and visit our newsletter for details:
Please visit our tutorial if you want to propose a new project, or join an existing project.
 
Jingjing Liang
added an update
Please join us for our Purdue Science-i Global Webinar (Globinar) Series 2022 “Empower the Under-Represented in Forest Science.”
There are two major benefits of participating in this year’s Globinar:
  • Converse and collaborate with our distinguished guest speakers
  • Coauthor a whitepaper entitled ‘Empower the Under-Represented in Forest Science,‘ to be published in a top academic journal.
All events@10:00-11:30am EST (4:00-5:30pm CET)
  • October 11, 2022
Bryan Van Stippen, Director, National Indian Carbon Coalition
  • October 25, 2022
Rocio Condor, Forestry Officer, FAO
Marcela Olguin, GHG Technical Expert, SilvaCarbon
Maricarmen Ruiz, REDD+ Expert, FAO Latin America
Javier G P Gamarra, International Consultant in Forestry Statistics
  • November 8, 2022
Patti Carroll, Sr. Strategist, Amazon Web Services
  • November 15, 2022
Bianca Lopez, Editor, Science Magazine
Details and registration: https://science-i.org/s-i-globinar
Please feel free to forward this email and the attached flyer, post to your department or program, or share them with anyone else who might be interested.
 
Jingjing Liang
added an update
Do you want to participate in 10+ global research studies in Science-i? Participate in the following 10-minute survey to join our data contributors' list.
 
Jingjing Liang
added a research item
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is one of the most recognized global patterns of species richness exhibited across a wide range of taxa. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed in the past two centuries to explain LDG, but rigorous tests of the drivers of LDGs have been limited by a lack of high-quality global species richness data. Here we produce a high-resolution (0.025° × 0.025°) map of local tree species richness using a global forest inventory database with individual tree information and local biophysical characteristics from ~1.3 million sample plots. We then quantify drivers of local tree species richness patterns across latitudes. Generally, annual mean temperature was a dominant predictor of tree species richness, which is most consistent with the metabolic theory of biodiversity (MTB). However, MTB underestimated LDG in the tropics, where high species richness was also moderated by topographic, soil and anthropogenic factors operating at local scales. Given that local landscape variables operate synergistically with bioclimatic factors in shaping the global LDG pattern, we suggest that MTB be extended to account for co-limitation by subordinate drivers.
Jingjing Liang
added an update
We are glad to launch Science-i on Strava! Please join us in running, cycling, swimming, rock climbing, skiing, etc. Let’s challenge each other, help each other, and have fun!
Our first challenge is to accumulate 5,000km in running distance and 10,000km in cycling. This challenge aims to increase the participation of underrepresented biodiversity scientists.
 
Jingjing Liang
added an update
Science-i service team members are starting to conduct #client_survey through brief 30-minute virtual and in-person interview sessions.
The main goal for this interview is for us to get a better understanding of the #disconnection between communities, data users, and data providers, how this has or has not posed an obstacle to your #research_collaborations, and how can Science-i better address this disconnection.
This interview is open to all Science-i members. No previous experience with team science is required. If you would like to participate in our interview, please contact us.
#Team_science #research #Science-i #customer_interview
 
Jingjing Liang
added a research item
Planting trillions of trees won’t replace the 10 million hectares of forest ecosystems lost each year, but documenting them could prevent further losses Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25333760-100-we-need-to-count-every-tree-on-the-planet-heres-why/#ixzz7XLUxMlu7
Jingjing Liang
added an update
Dear Fellow Scientists,
Welcome to Science–i.org, where scientists and communities work together to empower research and enrich diversity!
We created this monthly newsletter to update you with all the exciting events, projects, and publications at our platform.
We are here as your tour guide and fellow journeyers, to show you how you can benefit from and contribute to this platform.
Best regards
Jingjing Liang, Ph.D. Founder and CSO, Science–I
 
Jingjing Liang
added 6 research items
A spatially explicit global map of tree symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi reveals that climate variables are the primary drivers of the distribution of different types of symbiosis.
Global biodiversity and productivity The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem productivity has been explored in detail in herbaceous vegetation, but patterns in forests are far less well understood. Liang et al. have amassed a global forest data set from >770,000 sample plots in 44 countries. A positive and consistent relationship can be discerned between tree diversity and ecosystem productivity at landscape, country, and ecoregion scales. On average, a 10% loss in biodiversity leads to a 3% loss in productivity. This means that the economic value of maintaining biodiversity for the sake of global forest productivity is more than fivefold greater than global conservation costs. Science , this issue p. 196
2019, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited. In this Letter, the middle initial of author G. J. Nabuurs was omitted, and he should have been associated with an additional affiliation: ‘Forest Ecology and Forest Management Group, Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands’ (now added as affiliation 182). In addition, the following two statements have been added to the Supplementary Acknowledgements. (1): ‘We would particularly like to thank The French NFI for the work of the many field teams and engineers, who have made extraordinary efforts to make forest inventory data publicly available.’ (1): ‘Sergio de Miguel benefited from a Serra- Húnter Fellowship provided by the Generalitat of Catalonia.’ Finally, the second sentence of the Methods section should have cited the French NFI, which provided a national forestry database used in our analysis, to read as follows: ‘The GFBi database consists of individual-based data that we compiled from all the regional and national GFBi forest-inventory datasets, including the French NFI (IGN—French National Forest Inventory, raw data, annual campaigns 2005 and following, https://inventaire-forestier.ign.fr/spip.php?rubrique159, site accessed on 01 January 2015)’. All of these errors have been corrected online.
Jingjing Liang
added a project goal
Science-i, a transparent and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) web platform for international research collaboration, empowers ensemble research projects of everyone, especially under-represented and under-privileged people from across the world.