Project

SPRINZ Rugby Codes Research Group

Goal: Aims
Bring together expertise that integrates areas of sport research (injury prevention, strength & conditioning, sport technology, coaching, psychology, physiology, performance analysis, leadership, management).
Offer leading edge design and development solutions to rugby organisations, teams and players around the world.

The Rugby Codes Research Group (RCRG) was established in February 2010 based on the prior work in rugby related research of Professors Patria Hume and Will Hopkins and their postgraduate students – specifically Dr Ken Quarrie, Dr Simon Gianotti and Dr Doug King. Although injury prevention and strength and conditioning (S&C) was the original focus, the advent of the Rugby Codes Interdisciplinary Research Group means areas such as coaching, psychology, performance analysis, management and business are now included.
This exciting integrated approach means that knowledge across research areas will be combined allowing effective holistic advancement of practice within the rugby codes. The group includes members from undergraduate to professorial level and national and international collaborators. The group has a diverse team that includes epidemiologists, biomechanists, physiotherapists, medical doctors, an emergency nurse, professors, senior lecturers, lecturers as well as PhD, Masters, undergraduate exchange and BSR cooperative students.

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Project log

Patria Hume
added a research item
Objectives To evaluate the clinical utility of tactile somatosensory assessments to assist clinicians in diagnosing sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (SR-mTBI), classifying recovery trajectory based on performance at initial clinical assessment, and determining if neurophysiological recovery coincided with clinical recovery. Research Design Prospective cohort study with normative controls. Methods At admission ( n = 79) and discharge ( n = 45/79), SR-mTBI patients completed the SCAT-5 symptom scale, along with the following three components from the Cortical Metrics Brain Gauge somatosensory assessment (BG-SA): temporal order judgement (TOJ), TOJ with confounding condition (TOJc), and duration discrimination (DUR). To assist SR-mTBI diagnosis on admission, BG-SA performance was used in logistic regression to discriminate cases belonging to the SR-mTBI sample or a healthy reference sample (pooled BG-SA data for healthy participants in previous studies). Decision trees evaluated how accurately BG-SA performance classified SR-mTBI recovery trajectories. Results BG-SA TOJ, TOJc, and DUR poorly discriminated between cases belonging to the SR-mTBI sample or a healthy reference sample (0.54–0.70 AUC, 47.46–64.71 PPV, 48.48–61.11 NPV). The BG-SA evaluated did not accurately classify SR-mTBI recovery trajectories (> 14-day resolution 48%, ≤14–day resolution 54%, lost to referral/follow-up 45%). Mann-Whitney U tests revealed differences in BG-SA TOJc performance between SR-mTBI participants and the healthy reference sample at initial clinical assessment and at clinical recovery ( p < 0.05). Conclusions BG-SA TOJ, TOJc, and DUR appear to have limited clinical utility to assist clinicians with diagnosing SR-mTBI or predicting recovery trajectories under ecologically valid conditions. Neurophysiological abnormalities persisted beyond clinical recovery given abnormal BG-SA TOJc performance observed when SR-mTBI patients achieved clinical recovery.
Patria Hume
added a project goal
Aims
Bring together expertise that integrates areas of sport research (injury prevention, strength & conditioning, sport technology, coaching, psychology, physiology, performance analysis, leadership, management).
Offer leading edge design and development solutions to rugby organisations, teams and players around the world.
The Rugby Codes Research Group (RCRG) was established in February 2010 based on the prior work in rugby related research of Professors Patria Hume and Will Hopkins and their postgraduate students – specifically Dr Ken Quarrie, Dr Simon Gianotti and Dr Doug King. Although injury prevention and strength and conditioning (S&C) was the original focus, the advent of the Rugby Codes Interdisciplinary Research Group means areas such as coaching, psychology, performance analysis, management and business are now included.
This exciting integrated approach means that knowledge across research areas will be combined allowing effective holistic advancement of practice within the rugby codes. The group includes members from undergraduate to professorial level and national and international collaborators. The group has a diverse team that includes epidemiologists, biomechanists, physiotherapists, medical doctors, an emergency nurse, professors, senior lecturers, lecturers as well as PhD, Masters, undergraduate exchange and BSR cooperative students.