Project

Routines.Research.Community

Goal: We are an informal and collaborative incubator for research on organizational phenomena of societal concern, such as new forms of organizing, grand challenges, artificial intelligence, organizational design etc. For this, we believe that dialogue and collaboration with practice is essential. We study organizational phenomena through a routine dynamics lens, e.g. focusing on actions, practices and tools. We are creating research rather than disseminating finished work; a forum for asking questions, not just presenting answers. As such, we are incubating…
• New research ideas
• New methodologies
• New research collaborations
Our values include
• Space for discussion and reflection
• Open for new ideas, connections, theories…
• Experimenting
• Sense of community and helping each other
• Relaxed and fun atmosphere
We meet triannually in different locations across Europe.

Updates
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Project log

Yunchen Sun
added an update
I am glad to invite you to my hybrid doctoral thesis defense on Friday 21 October, at 10:15 (CET) in Hörsal 2, Ekonomikum, Uppsala, Sweden and via Zoom: https://uu-se.zoom.us/j/66363374338 (Meeting ID: 663 6337 4338).
I will defend the doctoral thesis:
Designing Routines for Industrial Digitalization
Opponent: Associate Professor F. Deken, School of Business and Economics, Knowledge, Information and Innovation, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
The Examining Committee consists of:
Professor Thomas Kalling, Department of Business Administration, Lund University School of Economics and Management Associate Professor Claire Ingram Bogusz, Department of Informatics and Media, Uppsala University Associate Professor Henrik Dellestrand, Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University
Chairperson at the doctoral thesis defense will be: Professor Fredrik Tell, Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University
The thesis can be retrieved from DiVA: http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:1692812
A few printed copies are aslo available, please contact me at yunchen.sun@fek.uu.se
All the best,
Yunchen Sun
PhD Candidate
Department of Business Studies
Uppsala University
 
Yeay! What a great accomplishment! Congratulations
 
Congrats, Yunchen!!
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
Incredibly honoured receive the James G. March prize 2022 with @neilpollock @glaserv for our paper on the ‘biography of an algorithm’ https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/26317877211004609 @egosnet @osofficer @OrgTheoryJrnl
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
Very honoured to have my ‘Replication Dilemma’ paper included as ’exemplary article’ within the newly published virtual special issue of Organization Science:
The Mechanisms and Components of Knowledge Transfer: The Virtual Special Issue on Knowledge Transfer Within Organizations
Linda Argote , Jerry Guo , Sae-Seul Park , Oliver Hahl
Published Online:21 Jun 2022https://doi.org/10.1287/orsc.2022.159
 
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
“Coping with Disruption: Precarity, Patterning and Social Justice”
At AoM 2022 in Seattle, the Strategizing Activities and Practices (SAP) Interest Group year is delighted to have Martha Feldman as our Distinguished Keynote Speaker. Martha will reflect on her latest work looking at how to ensure continuity in times of disruption and how this relates to precarity and social justice. Her talk will connect SAP research, routine dynamics and wider societal issues. A talk at the cutting edge of research, not to be missed.
Please join us for the SAP Distinguished Keynote on Monday, August 8th, from 4:30 – 6:00pm PDTin the Seattle Convention Center, Tahoma 5, as well as online on the AoM virtual platform.
The talk will also be available on the SAP Youtube channel after the conference.
 
Thomas Grisold
added an update
Hi fellow routine friends! Happy to share our new article where we develop teaching materials to integrate Business Process Management and Routine Dynamics research:
. You can find and use all teaching materials for free: www.bpm-and-routines.com! Happy to to hear your teaching experiences :) thanks to project team Waldemar Kremser Jan vom Brocke Jan Mendling Jan Recker Bastian Wurm
 
Omid Omidvar
added a research item
Organizations often fail to adequately respond to substantive changes in the environment, despite widespread implementation of algorithmic routines designed to enable dynamic adaptation. We develop a theory to explain this phenomenon based on an inductive, historical case study of the credit rating routine of Moody’s, an organization that failed to adapt to substantial changes in its environment leading up to the 2008 financial crisis. Our analysis of changes to the firm’s algorithmic credit rating routine reveals mechanisms whereby organizations dynamically produce inertia by taking actions that fail to produce significant change. Dynamic inertia occurs through bounded retheorization of the algorithmic model, sedimentation of assumptions about inputs to the algorithmic model, simulation of the unknown future, and specialized compartmentalization. We enable a better understanding of organizational inertia as a sociomaterial phenomenon by theorizing how—despite using algorithmic routines to improve organizational agility—organizations dynamically produce inertia, with potentially serious adverse consequences.
Christian Alexander Mahringer
added an update
Dear all,
We are excited to share that our symposium "Practice Perspectives on Grand Challenges: Insights from SAP and Routine Dynamics Research" has been accepted at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting 2022.
Martha S. Feldman, Paula Jarzabkowski, Brian Pentland, Linda Rouleau, Joel Gehman and Kathleen Sutcliffe will discuss the value and challenges of practice theory for studying and tackling grand challenges. Anja Danner-Schröder, Kathrin Sele and myself will moderate the symposium.
We are looking forward to an exciting discussion and exchange!
 
Waldemar Kremser
added an update
Dear RRC,
you still have 10 days left to apply for our next RRC meeting at the Johannes Kepler University in Linz (Austria, 28.9.-30.9.2022). We have 2,5 days of exciting programm (inc. evenings) ahead of us and look forward to a exploring possible futures of research on Routine Dynamics. As usual, there are no participation fees, but to ensure a workshop atmosphere and enough time to get to know each other, there are only limited places available.
Check out our website for info on the application process:
If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with one of the organizers (Thomas Grisold , Kathrin Sele , and myself)!
Cheers
Waldemar
 
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
Dear all,
Our Organisation & Work group at Warwick Business School is recruiting for a new Assistant Prof and Associate Prof position (closing date March 13th 2022). The group has a number of renowned practice theory and process scholars (e.g., Davide Nicolini, Hari Tsoukas, Jacky Swan) and it is a lovely bunch of people (our informal rule is to hire only nice people ;). Please let me know if you are interested in applying or want more background information on our group here:
 
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
2022 Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies: Studying Emotion or Affect?
Hybrid event; 12 – 14 July 2022
Applications close 18th March 2022.
Dear all,
The Warwick Summer School convenes scholars interested in practice and process studies in an open and multi-disciplinary learning community characterized by dialogue, discussion, and joint exploration. The Summer School is designed for those with an advanced understanding of practice and process theories. The three days will consider the state-of-the-art of practice, process and routines studies (2 days) and how we can advance practice and process studies on emotion and affect (1 day). The hybrid event will take place online and in-person at Warwick University, UK, for those happy to make their own travel and accommodation arrangements.
At Warwick, we always have a session dedicated to routine dynamics and research clinics for those routines scholars interested in getting feedback on their work. I think the topic of emotions and affect is also particularly relevant to routine dynamics scholars.
Hope to see some of you at the summer school :)
Katharina
 
Waldemar Kremser
added an update
we are excited to present you the official Call for Participation for our next and extended Routines.Research.Community meeting, which is organized Thomas Grisold , Kathrin Sele and myself. It is going to take place at the Johannes Kepler University in Linz (AT) from Sept 28 - Sept 30, 2022.
We will be joined by Martha S. Feldman Brian Pentland Leonhard Dobusch Daniel Geiger (University of Hamburg), Marleen Huysman (VU Amsterdam), Jan Mendling Elke Schüßler and, most importantly, YOU! Together, we will explore possible futures of Routine Dynamics research.
Check out our website for details (or get in touch with one of the organizers):
Cheers,
Waldemar
 
Waldemar Kremser
added an update
Dear all,
as you know, I have a special place in my heart for the Routines.Research.Community. And now, I also have (multiple) special places - 2 PhD's, 1 Postdoc - at the Institute for Strategic Management at the JKU Business School in Linz (AT) :) If you are interested in becoming part of my new team there (starting as a full prof on Feb 1), or know anyone who might be, please check out these job openings:
Postdoc Computational Social Sciences:
Are you passionate about developing and applying methods to collect and analyze digital trace data to help us understand agile & open forms of organizing?
Do you want to collaborate with international top scholars in the fields of strategic management, organization theory, information systems, and computer science?
Are you motivated to further develop your profile as an international top scholar at the interface between computer sciences and social sciences?
Then this job posting is for you:
PhD Agile Forms of Organizing:
Decentralized and agile forms of organizing (e.g. Holacracy, Scaled Agile Framework, Teal) are increasingly implemented also by larger organizations, usually with the help of numerous digital tools. And while some organizations can leverage this new form of organizing to become more innovative, inclusive, and successful, others fail.
But what makes the difference?
Do you want to collaborate with international top scholars and passionate practitioners to find answers to this important question? And are you interested in the exciting new opportunities that come with the analysis of digital trace data in organizations?
Then this PhD position is for you:
PhD Open Strategy:
Why are some of the most successful companies of our time able to stay ahead of the competition? We think it has a lot to do with the fact that they were able to open up to new people and new ideas to stay ahead of the game.
But opening up is not easy!
Do you want to collaborate with international top scholars and passionate practitioners to help us understand how we can empower organizations to open up their strategy process to new actors, new topics, and new values?
Then this PhD position is for you:
Cheers
Waldemar
PS: If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at waldemar.kremser@jku.at
 
Kathrin Sele
added an update
Join us for our next seminar on February 1st at 17h CET via Zoom with Christine Beckman and Melissa Mazmanian talking about their recent book and the ethnographic study that led to it.
Please register through our website (preferable before January 28th): https://www.ethnographyatelier.org/beckman-mazmanian
From Dreams of the Overworked To Time Cascades for the Ideal Worker
In their recently published book Dreams of the Overworked: Living, Working, and Parenting in the Digital Age, Christine Beckman and Melissa Mazmanian offer vivid sketches of daily life for nine families in Southern California, capturing what it means to live, work, and parent in a world of impossible expectations – expectations amplified by smart devices. In this book, the reader is invited into the homes and offices of these working professional in order to witness the crushing pressure of unraveling plans and celebrate how people—through a web of social “scaffolding”—support each other’s dreams. This book challenges the seductive myth of the individual with phone in hand, doing it all on their own. This ideal didn’t capture the reality of everyday life, even before the pandemic hit. In truth, beneath the veneer of technology is a complex, hidden system of support—our dreams have always been scaffolded by retired in-laws, friendly neighbors, spouses, schools, and paid help. This book makes the case for celebrating the structures that allow us to strive for our dreams by supporting public policies for caring work, challenging workplace norms, reexamining our use of technology, reimagining family and community, and valuing invisible work on the home front. In this talk, Christine and Melissa will provide an overview of the book with an emphasis on the ethnographic data collection. They will preview a working paper that examines how "time cascades" enable workers to respond to work demands that assume everyone should be an Ideal Worker.
Best,
Ruthanne & Kathrin
 
Private Profile
added an update
Join us on Tuesday January 11th at 15h CET (via Zoom) for an exciting seminar with Michel Anteby (Boston University) titled "Learning to Labor Like a Hard-working Immigrant" (see abstract below).
To register: https://www.ethnographyatelier.org/michel-anteby -- You will receive a zoom link before the seminar.
Abstract
Immigrant laborers are often extolled for their superior work ethic, a presumably essential trait which characterizes immigrants prior to working in host countries. The trope of the hard-working immigrant appears in both popular and scholarly accounts. In contrast, we consider hard work as a learned disposition, and ask, how do foreigners learn to embrace working hard at low-wage jobs? Based on a qualitative longitudinal study of international student workers in temporary service jobs, we examine hard work as a process of acculturation to the American workplace. Using ethnographic data on three seasons in a tourism-dependent location, we show that, over the course of their seasonal employment, students shift from consumers seeking a cultural experience to economically motivated hard workers: industrious, managing multiple jobs, and uninterested in leisure. While their employers see foreign students as possessing a superior work ethic, we argue that their work habits result primarily from prevailing labor conditions in the work setting and beyond, including high living costs, restricted leisure time, and precarious pay and hours. In the course of becoming structurally disadvantaged, these students become hard-working immigrants. Our findings inform debates on labor and immigration by unpacking and partly debunking notions of culturally specific work ethics.
Best,
Kathrin, Ruthanne and Giada
 
Waldemar Kremser
added an update
Great news everyone!
We (Kathrin Sele , Thomas Grisold & myself) are in the midst of organizing a 2,5 days RRC Meeting at the Johannes Kepler University in Linz (Austria) from Sept 28 - 30, 2022. Martha S. Feldman & Brian Pentland will be there to talk about their next big thing. And we will also have the opportunity to explore new topics & methods with a number of senior scholars from adjacent fields (tba).
More information will come soon. But for now: SAVE THE DATE! It's going to be great (remember the 2,5 days in Aalto in 2019?)!
If you have any ideas/suggestions for new formats/important topics/interesting speakers, etc. please get in touch!
Cheers
Waldemar
 
Kathrin Sele
added an update
Join us for Giada and Scott's seminar presentation next Tuesday on:
Connecting Actions and Creating Recognizability in Routines
Our study examines how actions are connected in organizational routines, i.e., repetitive and recognizable patterns of interdependent actions, when key participants are newcomers. For routine dynamics, the connecting of actions plays a central role in patterning, i.e., the process through which participants create recognizability. While recent research has explored the roles of performing and experiences, less is known regarding how actions are connected when key participants in the routine are newcomers who typically lack recognition.
​We examine this issue by exploring a creativity routine at a design agency. We draw from seven months of fieldwork that trace a multi-project collaboration involving the agency and a new client team. Based on our analysis of the corresponding data which spans observation, artifacts, and interviews, we identify key findings and insights that center on the granularity and temporality of connecting actions in routines, and we consider how such connecting unfolds over time. These findings and insights advance the scholarly understanding of patterning and routine dynamics research.
 
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
Dear Routine Dynamics Community
The Routine Dynamics Handbook is coming out at the end of this month, and we're having a Halloween party to celebrate!
Come join with others in the Routine Dynamics community to share whatever you are excited about these days. Costumes are encouraged but not required. (Apparently a green outfit against a green screen makes for a great ghost.) We are eager to see you!
See attached flyer for details and zoom link. The party time is an effort to accommodate our many time zones. We hope you can make it.
The Editors
Martha, Brian, Luciana, Claus, David and Katharina
 
Kathrin Sele
added an update
Join us on Tuesday October 5th at 15h CET (via Zoom) for an exciting seminar with Katharina Dittrich and Julius Kob from Warwick Business School.
A multi-sited team ethnography of "Financially redesigning the Anthropocene"
Abstract: Capital allocation is a powerful way of distributing agency – both diverting and directing it. The consequences of this feature of financial markets have never been limited to only direct market participants but, of course, stretch out into virtually all spheres of societies and environments. To a large extent, the global climate crisis is one of these consequences. This research project looks at the various finance-focused programs that are currently pursued to manage the climate crisis as leveraging this feature of financial markets to redistribute – purposefully divert and direct – agency towards more sustainable economies and societies. These programs could be described, in other words, as attempts to ‘financially re-design’ the Anthropocene.
This ethnography aims at tracing these attempts by focusing on one core challenge: the production of actionable data and analytics for climate risks and alignment targets which enable climate risk and impact management practices in the investment industry. While a lot of different high-level policy, NGO and industry programs have recently been initiated, we are interested in how the proposed tools, data and manuals are actually implemented, used and combined in financial every-day practices. Four types of actors that are active in climate-related investment practices ‘on the ground’, and which we currently work with, are: institutional investors, investor networks, analytics and data providers, and NGOs.
To register (preferably before October 1st): https://www.ethnographyatelier.org/katharina-dittrich-and-julius-kob. You will then get a zoom link before the seminar.
Best wishes,
Kathrin & Ruthanne
 
Kathrin Sele
added an update
Dear all
The Ethnography Atelier is pleased to announce its first seminar of this academic year. The seminar will take place on Tuesday September 7th at 15h CET via Zoom.
Our speaker is Arvind Karunakaran, Assistant Professor at McGill University, who will be presenting his ethnography of 911 emergency management:
Front-line Professionals in the Wake of Public Scrutiny
Abstract: In this research, I examine how front-line professionals respond to public scrutiny via social media, and with what consequences for professional accountability? Based on an ethnography of 911 emergency management, I find that public scrutiny of 911 call-takers – the front-line professionals in this setting – via social media can end up obscuring, as opposed to improving, professional accountability. I elaborate on the processes that produce these paradoxical outcomes and discuss their theoretical implications.
To register for the seminar (preferably before September 4th) follow this link: https://www.ethnographyatelier.org/arvind-karunakaran
Our complete list of 2021/22 speakers and other resources are available on our website: https://www.ethnographyatelier.org
Best wishes,
Kathrin & Ruthanne
 
Katharina S. Schilli
added an update
Dear all,
We are delighted to present our new design and homepage of the Practice and Process Reading Group: practice-process.com 🎊
On the homepage, you will find podcasts capturing previous interviews with leading Practice and Process Scholars and information about upcoming PPR Zoom Sessions.
We would like to especially thank purudesign.com for the professional and inspiring co-creation of our new design, and the breathtaking visual results!!
Also, we would like to kindly thank the turunkauppaseura.fi Foundation to financially enable our tech and design efforts!
Both have fundamentally supported our quest to build an active international community of (early career) Practice and Process scholars.
We are looking forward to meeting you again on August 27th with our valued guest Luciana D'Adderio. You may check our homepage for further information. :)
With best wishes,
The PPR Group
Dr. Shilpi Banerjee, Adjunct Faculty, American University of Dubai
Katharina Schilli, Doctoral Candidate, Turku School of Economics, Finland
Heiko Marc Schmidt , Doctoral Candidate, Universidad EAFIT, Colombia
Verena Timmer, Doctoral Candidate, Witten/Herdecke University, Germany
 
Conor Horan
added an update
Hi Conor - Thanks for checking this. Please post the following question:
Dear Routines.Research.Community, I'm looking for studies/ ideas on intersecting routines, routine networks etc. I'm interested in inter-routine coordination, proactivity (e.g. predictive analytics but not primarily from a technology point of view), and strategic/governance dimensions of intersecting routines. Thanks in advance!
Gracias!
 
Joanna Kho
added a research item
This chapter considers how facets of occupations and professions manifest in routine dynamics. Whilst the salience of occupations and professions on routines has been recognized in extant research on routine dynamics, it remains largely scattered. To illuminate the salience of occupations and professions in the literature on routine dynamics, which is multifaceted, we focus on three prominent research themes: skillful accomplishment (i.e., how actors perform tasks), interdependence (i.e., how actors collaborate to accomplish tasks) and truces (i.e., how actors compete to make exclusive claims to perform certain activities). We turn to the literature on professions and occupations to draw out theoretical and empirical intersections with research advocating routine dynamics. The analytical framework, comprised of a becoming lens, a doing lens and a relating lens corresponds with and provides the basis to advance research themes within routine dynamics. We suggest a stronger emphasis on occupations and professions holds promise for deepening knowledge about routine dynamics, which we articulate by proposing several avenues for future research, including the expansion of the concept of routines and a distinction between organizational and professional routines. Keywords: routine dynamics, interdependence, skillful accomplishment, occupations, professions
Katharina S. Schilli
added an update
Dear all,
June has offered us the special opportunity to also have a conversation with Prof. Brian Pentland. We warmly welcome you to our common Zoom session on Friday, 25th of June 2021, 16:00 CEST / Berlin!
The Practice and Process Reading Group is pleased to invite you to the next reading session with: Prof. Brian Pentland, Main Street Capital Partners Endowed Professor, Department of Accounting and Information Systems, Michigan State University.
In conversation with Katharina Schilli, PhD Candidate, Turku School of Economics, discussing for 30 minutes the paper:
Pentland, B. T., Mahringer, C. A., Dittrich, K., Feldman, M. S., & Wolf, J. R. (2020). Process Multiplicity and Process Dynamics: Weaving the Space of Possible Paths. Organization Theory, 1(3).
The interview is followed by audience Q&A for 60 minutes moderated by Verena Timmer, PhD Candidate, Witten/Herdecke University.
Register to the event and join us on Friday 25th of June 2021, 16:00 CEST / Berlin:
We look forward to your active participation!
 
Katharina S. Schilli
added an update
Dear All,
We are delighted to announce our next Practice and Process Reading Session with Prof. Martha Feldman on Friday, 4th of June 2021. Please find below the invitation and the registration link.
Side note – our homepage will be launched soon, including previous interview recordings and a schedule of upcoming sessions.
The Practice and Process Reading Group is pleased to invite you to the next reading session with :
Professor Martha S. Feldman, Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy, Management, Political Science and Sociology; Johnson Chair for Civic Governance and Public Management; Director of the PhD program in Planning, Policy and Design, University of California, Irvine
In conversation with Katharina Schilli, Doctoral Candidate, Turku School of Economics, Finland
Discussing for 30 minutes the paper:
Feldman, M. S. (2000). Organizational routines as a source of continuous change. Organization Science, 11(6), 611-629.
The interview is followed by audience Q&A for 60 minutes moderated by Dr. Shilpi Banerjee, Adjunct Faculty, American University in Dubai.
Register to the event and join us on Friday, 4th June 2021, 17:00 CEST/Berlin
We look forward to your active participation!
 
Thomas Grisold
added an update
Happy to share that our work on business processes/organizational routines has been officially published: https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/3462766.3462773.
Jan Mendling, Nick Berente, Stefan Seidel and I argue that the BPM community and the Routine Dynamics community are looking at the same phenomenon - but they have been developing different methods to foreground different things. A cross-fertilization between these communities seems promising in many ways.
If you are interested in/working on these matters, consider submitting your research to our workshop on BPM and Routine Dynamics: https://bpmandrd.ai.wu.ac.at/.
DEADLINE: MAY 24!
Bastian Wurm, Waldemar Kremser Jan Mendling, myself and a fantastic program committee are looking forward to receiving your work!
 
Conor Horan
added an update
Great PhD / New Researcher Session - thanks to Katharina & Luciana for their time.
Just to post a set of links, event, and conference thank might be of interest to you here.
Information about the Routines Research Community
Researchgate
Linkedin
You can sign up for our mailing list here:
Some Websites
Other Pages of Interest
Practice & Process Reading Group
Next Event: The Practice and Process Reading Group is pleased to invite you to the next reading session, as an opportunity to learn from academic authors who focus on practice and process research. The first part of the event includes an interview with our guest authors Prof. Carlo Salvato and Prof. Claus Rerup. In the second part, the floor is open for a common Zoom discussion.
Register to the event and join us on 30th April 2021, 16:00 CET, for a discussion with:
Prof. Carlo Salvato, Professor of Business Strategy, Department of Management and Technology, University of Bocconi (Italy)
Prof. Claus Rerup, Professor of Management, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management (Germany)
In conversation with Dr. M. May Seitanidi, Reader in Strategy, Kent Business School, University of Kent, UK
Time Research Community
Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies
Twitter: PPI@Warwick
Conferences
PROS Symposium
Theme: Organizing beyond organizations for the common good: Confronting major societal challenges through process studies General process-oriented and theme-focused papers are invited 1-4 September 2021. Conveners: Joel Gehman, Paula Jarzabkowski, Ann Langley, Haridimos Tsoukas,
(process.symposium@gmail.com). Keynote Speakers: Jennifer Howard-Grenville, Catherine Keller, Steven Maguire
EGOS
Deadlines for submission of full papers: Monday, June 21, 2021 (23:59 CEST)
EGOS Vienna 2022
Routine Dynamics Subtheme @ EGOS 2022 WU Vienna
We are excited to announce that the Routine Dynamics subtheme at EGOS 2022 has been accepted. Convened by Brian Pentland, Birgit Renzl and myself (Christian), we welcome submissions that relate to the subtheme topic "Routine Dynamics, Agility and Innovation," but also Routine Dynamics research more generally. Please find the Call for Papers attached.We are looking forward to meeting you in Vienna!
 
Conor Horan
added an update
Happy Easter everyone!!! The full event at 1 PM (BST). You will also find the Zoom links (with passcodes) for each session below. This will also be circulated by email (apologies for cross-posting).
If you have any questions do let me know.
Looking forward to seeing you on Friday!
Kindest Regards
Conor
Routines Research Community Meeting
9th April 2020
NOTE: All times are BST Dublin, London, Lisbon.
11 AM – 12:00 PM Introduction to Routine Dynamics & Process Based Research - PhD/New Researcher Session co-facilitated by Katharina Dittrich & Luciana D’Adderio.
This introductory session is for PhD students and new researchers to Routine Dynamics. A Q&A session is included. To attend this please email conor.horan@tudublin.ie and a Zoom link will be circulated beforehand. The facilitators have asked that you review the following;
The Preface & Chapter 1 of the Cambridge Handbook of Routine Dynamics. These can be found at:
Please read 1 of the following papers;
Dittrich, Katharina; Guérard, Stéphane; Seidl, David (2016): Talking About Routines. The Role of Reflective Talk in Routine Change. In Organization Science 27 (3), pp. 678–697. DOI: 10.1287/orsc.2015.1024.
D’Adderio, L. (2014). The Replication Dilemma Unravelled: How Organizations Enact Multiple Goals in Routine Transfer. Organization Science, 25(5), 1325-1350.
For a Zoom link to this session please email conor.horan@tudublin.ie
VIRTUAL LUNCH
1 PM – 2PM Keynote Speaker: Prof Haridimos Tsoukas on the Developments in Process Based Research
Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID : 820 2799 2402 | Passcode 691025
2 PM – 2:45 PM 3 Concurrent Roundtable Session(s) – 45minutes
Roles & Routines
Hosts: Blagoy Blagoev, Jeannette Eberhard, Waldemar Kremser & Virginia Rosales-Orquera
Routines are a concept that helps us theorize how people ‘get things done’ in organizations. But organizations are more than tools for ‘getting things done.’ They are also webs of social relations among people, where ‘getting along with each other’ – usually theorized through the concept of roles – is at least as important as ‘getting things done.’ In this roundtable, we will explore how roles enriched our research on routines and invite participants to do the same. We will contrast the dynamics and patterning of roles and routines, and discuss how their interplay enables us to shed new light on small and large phenomena in and around organizations.
Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 857 7817 4948 | Kenncode: 2
The Paradox of Temporary Organising
Hosts: Simon Addyman, Susanna Hedborg Bengtsson
Projects, as forms of temporary organising, in industries such as construction and infrastructure, are seen as the appropriate organisational form for capital expenditure. Yet when we bring together the literature on temporary organisations and organisational routines we observe a paradoxical situation. Organisational routines are defined as “repetitive, recognisable patterns of interdependent actions, carried out by multiple participants” (Feldman and Pentland, 2003:95) and hence carry an underlying assumption that the organisation ‘already exists’ in the ‘ongoing present’, capable of routine re-creation. Projects, as temporary organisations, carry an underlying assumption that the organisation does not exist in the ‘ongoing present’ until ‘created anew’ and given, ex-ante, a time delimited life cycle (Lundin and Söderholm, 1995). This ‘newness’ characteristic of temporary organisations suggests a lack of ‘repeatable and recognisable patterns of action’, making them potentially unstable arrangements until participants have exchanged information, reduced uncertainty and routines are (re)created".
Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 971 0830 0954 |Passcode 114259
Bodies and Routines
Hosts: Charlotte Blanche & Martha Feldman
This roundtable sheds light on bodies in the dynamics of routines. Though the body has just begun to be theorized in Routine Dynamics research, the body is, nonetheless, pervasive. We show how ubiquitous the bodies are in Routine Dynamics research by documenting the embodied orientation “to” and “from” performing, “to” and “from” patterns, and “to” and “from” situation or materiality in 13 reference articles. By exploring one of these articles in more depth, we show how theorizing the body more explicitly has potential for deepening our understanding of the processual mechanisms of routine.
Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 814 8265 6099 |Passcode 743797
2:45 PM – 3:30 PM Open Governance Session
Zoom Meeting | Meeting ID 830 2102 3169 |Passcode 365238
Conference Close 3:30 PM BST
 
Conor Horan
added an update
Hi everyone! Happy St.Patricks Day!
Below you'll find the schedule for the next meeting. As we are running concurrent sessions there will be different Zoom links. I will release these closer to the date.
For those interested in the PhD / new researchers session (11 Am BST) please email me at conor.horan@tudublin.ie .
If I have any updates I will let you know here & circulate by email.
Many thanks
Conor
Routines Research Community Meeting - 9th April 2020
NOTE: All times are BST Dublin, London, Lisbon.
11 AM – 12:00 PM Introduction to Routine Dynamics & Process Based Research - PhD/New Researcher Session co-facilitated by Katharina Dittrich & Luciana D’Adderio.
This introductory session is for PhD students and new researchers to Routine Dynamics. A Q&A session is included. To attend this please email conor.horan@tudublin.ie and a Zoom link will be circulated beforehand. The facilitators have asked that you review the following;
The Preface & Chapter 1 of the Cambridge Handbook of Routine Dynamics. These can be found at:
Please read 1 of the following papers;
Dittrich, Katharina; Guérard, Stéphane; Seidl, David (2016): Talking About Routines. The Role of Reflective Talk in Routine Change. In Organization Science 27 (3), pp. 678–697. DOI: 10.1287/orsc.2015.1024.
D’Adderio, L. (2014). The Replication Dilemma Unravelled: How Organizations Enact Multiple Goals in Routine Transfer. Organization Science, 25(5), 1325-1350.
12:00 - 1:00 VIRTUAL LUNCH
1 PM – 2PM Keynote Speaker: Prof Haridimos Tsoukas on the Developments in Process Based Research
2 PM – 2:45 PM 3 Concurrent Roundtable Session(s) – 45minutes
Roles & Routines: Blagoy Blagoev, Jeannette Eberhard, Waldemar Kremser & Virginia Rosales-Orquera
Routines are a concept that helps us theorize how people ‘get things done’ in organizations. But organizations are more than tools for ‘getting things done.’ They are also webs of social relations among people, where ‘getting along with each other’ – usually theorized through the concept of roles – is at least as important as ‘getting things done.’ In this roundtable, we will explore how roles enriched our research on routines and invite participants to do the same. We will contrast the dynamics and patterning of roles and routines, and discuss how their interplay enables us to shed new light on small and large phenomena in and around organizations.
The Paradox of Temporary Organising: Simon Addyman, Susanna Hedborg Bengtsson
Projects, as forms of temporary organising, in industries such as construction and infrastructure, are seen as the appropriate organisational form for capital expenditure. Yet when we bring together the literature on temporary organisations and organisational routines we observe a paradoxical situation. Organisational routines are defined as “repetitive, recognisable patterns of interdependent actions, carried out by multiple participants” (Feldman and Pentland, 2003:95) and hence carry an underlying assumption that the organisation ‘already exists’ in the ‘ongoing present’, capable of routine re-creation. Projects, as temporary organisations, carry an underlying assumption that the organisation does not exist in the ‘ongoing present’ until ‘created anew’ and given, ex-ante, a time delimited life cycle (Lundin and Söderholm, 1995). This ‘newness’ characteristic of temporary organisations suggests a lack of ‘repeatable and recognisable patterns of action’, making them potentially unstable arrangements until participants have exchanged information, reduced uncertainty and routines are (re)created".
Bodies and Routines: Charlotte Blanche & Martha Feldman
This roundtable sheds light on bodies in the dynamics of routines. Though the body has just begun to be theorized in Routine Dynamics research, the body is, nonetheless, pervasive. We show how ubiquitous the bodies are in Routine Dynamics research by documenting the embodied orientation “to” and “from” performing, “to” and “from” patterns, and “to” and “from” situation or materiality in 13 reference articles. By exploring one of these articles in more depth, we show how theorizing the body more explicitly has potential for deepening our understanding of the processual mechanisms of routine.
2:45 PM – 3:30 PM Open Governance Session
Close 3:30 PM BST
 
Christian Alexander Mahringer
added an update
We are excited to announce that the Routine Dynamics subtheme at EGOS 2022 has been accepted. Convened by Brian Pentland, Birgit Renzl and myself, we welcome submissions that relate to the subtheme topic "Routine Dynamics, Agility and Innovation," but also Routine Dynamics research more generally. Please find the Call for Papers attached.
We are looking forward to meeting you in Vienna!
 
Dehua Gao
added an update
Our paper coauthored with Aliakbar Akbaritabar (Ali) "Using Agent-based Modeling in Routine Dynamics Research: A Quantitative and Content Analysis of Literature" is now online available in the journal Review of Managerial Science.
This is a twin sister of the book chapter "Agent-based modeling in routine dynamics" included in the Cambridge Handbook of Routine Dynamics (2021 forthcoming). That book chapter mainly provided an overview of the ABM methodology in routine dynamics, and concentrated on a summary and comparison of the models. It thus tried to answer the questions (1) What is the ABM? and (2) How can it be used in routine dynamics?. Whilst this paper did a quantitative and content analysis of the literature and showed a whole but detailed picture of this research field. We put forward some possible directions for the future work, and expect a dialogue and building bridges between ABM modelers and routine scholars to promote the development in this area.
Abstract: This paper presents an overview of all scientific contributions using agent-based modeling (ABM) methodology in routine dynamics research. That is a specialized area of study and our extensive literature search revealed only a total of 12 contributions. We did a quantitative analysis of these published literature using co-authorship, cross-citation and bibliographic coupling methods. We then complemented the overview with a content analysis of substantial focus of these literatures. We summarized their findings and showed how ABM is applied in routine dynamics research. By elaborating on what has been done, we provide an overview of this newly emerging research field and present possible directions for future work. Even though there are only a few publications in this research field, we expect that dialogue between ABM modelers and routine scholars would be beneficial to promote the development in this area. It would be conducive to advancing the understanding of complex internal structure, processes and dynamics of organizational routines.
Keywords: Organizational routines; Routine dynamics; Agent-based modeling (ABM); Bibliographic coupling; Content analysis
 
Thomas Grisold
added an update
Hi everybody! In conjunction with the International Conference on BPM, we are organizing a workshop on the intersection between Business Process Management and Routine Dynamics (Sept 2021). Consider submitting your work to advance interdisciplinary research on processes! Co-organized with Bastian Wurm , Waldemar Kremser and Jan Mendling, and a fantastic program committee!
Find more information here : https://bpmandrd.ai.wu.ac.at/
 
Maria Esther Christina Booth
added an update
Postdoc opportunities at the House of Innovation at Stockholm School of Economics (another six related positions in Umeå and Gothenburg).
 
Katharina S. Schilli
added an update
Dear all, we warmly invite you to our next Practice and Process Reading Session with ‪Prof. Haridimos Tsoukas.
‪Join us on the 26th of February 2021, 16:00 CET (Berlin), for a Zoom discussion with Prof. Haridimos Tsoukas, Professor of Organization Studies, Warwick Business School and Professor of Strategic Management, University of Cyprus, in conversation with Dr. Shilpi Banerjee, Adjunct Faculty, American University of Dubai.
‪Prof. Tsoukas will be discussing for approx. 30 minutes his article "Don't simplify, complexify: From disjunctive to conjunctive theorizing in organization and management studies" (Tsoukas, 2017). Afterwards, we open the floor for a 60 minute, off-the-record Zoom discussion.
Kindly register here: https://bit.ly/2O2BhOc
‪The article is available to download (we urge you to read the paper before the event) by following the link: https://bit.ly/3cWA0mv
‪We look forward to your participation!
‪The Practice and Process Reading Group
*****
The Practice and Process Reading Group (PPRG) is an initiative by practice and process emerging scholars in the field with the aim to:
(1) develop awareness of practice and process research
(2) provide guidance in reading and understanding that research
(3) develop a supportive research community around these goals
Stay tuned for our homepage and newsletter for upcoming events, which will be launched during spring. :)
Best regards,
Katharina
 
Conor Horan
added an update
Dear colleagues - just a gentle reminder to save the date for the next meeting - 9th April 2021
The speakers are nearly finalised.
Closer the date I will confirm the exact times for the sessions.
Best wishes from a snowy Dublin.
Take care and stay safe!
 
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
Dear RRC members,
We’re pleased to share details of the 2021 Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies which this year includes a Beginner’s Introduction to Practice and Process Studies
2021 Warwick Summer School on Practice and Process Studies: Pushing the Boundaries of Sociomateriality
27-29 July 2021
Online (BST) + possible physical gathering for local attendees 
Keynote speaker: Wanda Orlikowski (MIT Sloan School of Management)
2021 Beginners’ Introduction to Practice and Process Studies
21 July 2021
Online (BST)
Applications close 15th March 2021. To apply and for further information please find the flyer attached.
While the summer school covers practice and process perspectives in general, there will also be a session specific to state-of-the-art understanding of routines :)
If you have any questions, please email matthew.hurst@warwick.coc.uk or katharina.dittrich@wbs.ac.uk
We look forward to seeing you!
The organizers – Mira Slavova, Katharina Dittrich & Matthew Hurst
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
I am offering a PhD studentship as part of my Chancellor's Fellow programme of work: ‘ Artificial intelligence in practice: implementing AI and data-driven technologies in organizations.’ If you know of any interested students please do pass the link below onto them – also please do circulate around your network!
 
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added an update
Following up on Katharina's recent talk at the PPI seminars (superb!), I will present my work towards pragmatist methodology, drawing on practice, process and performativity. Given the interest of routines scholars in pragmatism, temporality, process, design, and highlighting the creativity of action, this should be relevant. The audience is mainly practice and process researchers, and I will highlight a pragmatist perspective on practice and process research. I will use my reflections on my fieldwork with a leading design agency moving into organisation design to highlight the challenges and lessons learned in moving towards pragmatist methodology. An earlier version of this work (co-authored by Philippe Lorino ) was just published in the Perspectives on Process Organization Studies Book series at OUP: I think this should be interesting to those of you interested in performativity, pragmatist practice theory, ontological process and creativity of action. For more details about the event check: https://www.wbs.ac.uk/events/view/6786 The event is on 18th March 2021 from 13:00 - 14:30 (GMT). If you want to sign-up please email to maria.l.garcia@wbs.ac.uk Would be great to have some routines scholars in the audience! Kind regards, Frithjof
 
Mehdi Safavi
added a research item
Studies analyzing organizational routines in post-merger integration (PMI) studies at the micro level are almost nonexistent. To fill this research gap, the author performs a longitudinal exploratory case study of an admissions routine of an art college undergoing a merger with a larger university, drawing on advances in routine dynamics literature. The study enhances understanding of PMI challenges by depicting routines’ internal dynamics, their incompatibility, and the role of broader context in shaping their performances post-merger. The findings trace resistance to PMI to routine incompatibility caused by the simultaneous presence of multiple understandings (ostensive aspects) for integration, generated by the quest for efficiency-based synergies and continuity within the university post-merger, and for preservation, inherited from the pre-merger era and the routine embeddedness within the local context. The findings shed new light on the post-merger integration–preservation dilemma by illustrating how the interplay of routine participants’ agency and routine embeddedness within the organization and broader societal context constrains PMI, in spite of an intended full consolidation plan, as routine participants enact the routine in the emerging context.
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added a research item
Organizational actors spend a tremendous amount of time and energy trying to intentionally change their routines. We conceptualize these intentional changes as routine design—intentional efforts to change one or more aspects of a routine to create a preferred situation. We review existing routines research on intentional change by showing how different perspectives on routines have generated different insights about the relationship between intentional change and design. We highlight a cognitive perspective, a practice perspective, and an ontological process perspective on routine design. We then draw on two perspectives inspired by design studies. Simon’s scientific perspective on design suggests that routines scholars study the effects and implications of designing artifacts. Schön’s reflective practice perspective on design suggests that routines scholars can examine how actors set the problem, engage in (re)framing, and in reflection-in-action. These design studies perspectives offer routines scholars a better understanding of efforts to intentionally change routines. Based on these insights from design studies, we develop a future research agenda for routine design.
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
Dear all,
Apologies for the late notice, but maybe some of you are interested in joining a talk I will be giving at the PPI Speakers Series at Warwick Business School on Thursday, January 14th from 3pm to 4:30pm British Standard Time.
In the talk, I will introduce the Handbook on Routine Dynamics, reflect on some of the Lessons Learned from editing the handbook, how routine dynamics relates to other Practice and Process Approaches in Organisation Studies and provide an overview of the topics included in the handbook.
Since the event takes place online, you are more than welcome to join. If you are interested, please email maria.l.garcia@wbs.ac.uk
Best wishes
Katharina
 
Martha S. Feldman
added an update
Attached is the chapter on practice theory and routine dynamics that is Chapter 2 of the Handbook of Routine Dynamics, forthcoming Cambridge University Press. I hope it is useful!
 
Waldemar Kremser
added an update
As you might have noticed, the EGOS Board elections are up and running. I have also forwarded my candidacy, attached please find my mission statement. EGOS and the annual colloquia in particular have been important for the formation of the routine dynamics community, so participating in the elections might be of interest to the community.
Many thanks for considering me as a candidate and thanks for voting!
With best wishes
Daniel
 
Conor Horan
added an update
This might be of interest - this was taken from Miriam Feul's post in the Time Research Community project log (apparently sharing posts is really difficult in Researchgate!).
@bout time webinar with Daniel Geiger on: Getting ahead of time: Studying the enactment of time in the coordination of routines
The Centre for Organizational Time would like to invite you to another thought-provoking webinar. We are excited that Daniel Geiger will give a talk on temporality and routine coordination. In particular, he will give us some novel insights on the enactment of time and the way temporal autonomy may be achieved. Time and Date December 7th 2020 13.00– 15.00 CET Format Webinar on Microsoft Teams. Presentation by Daniel Geiger followed by a joint discussion. Registration Please email sls.ioa@cbs.dk to receive the Teams invitation link We hope that you can join us! This will be the last talk this year. We wish you all a wonderful winter season and are very much looking forward to continuing the discussion next year!
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
Our new paper on ‘the biography of an algorithm’ with Vern Glaser and Neil Pollock now accepted for publication in Org Theory:
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added a research item
Algorithms are ubiquitous in modern organizations. Typically, researchers have viewed algorithms as self-contained computational tools that either magnify organizational capabilities or generate unintended negative consequences. To overcome this limited understanding of algorithms as stable entities, we propose two moves. The first entails building on a performative perspective to theorize algorithms as entangled, relational, emergent, and nested assemblages that use theories-and the sociomaterial networks they invoke-to automate decisions, enact roles and expertise, and perform calculations. The second move entails building on our dynamic perspective on algorithms to theorize how algorithms evolve as they move across contexts and over time. To this end, we introduce a biographical perspective on algorithms which traces their evolution by focusing on key "biographical moments." We conclude by discussing how our performativity-inspired biographical perspective on algorithms can help management and organization scholars better understand organizational decision-making, the spread of technologies and their logics, and the dynamics of practices and routines. 3
Joanna Kho
added a research item
This chapter considers how facets of occupations and professions manifest in routine dynamics. Whilst the salience of occupations and professions on routines has been recognized in extant research on routine dynamics, it remains largely scattered. To illuminate the salience of occupations and professions in the literature on routine dynamics, which is multifaceted, we focus on three prominent research themes: skillful accomplishment (i.e., how actors perform tasks), interdependence (i.e., how actors collaborate to accomplish tasks) and truces (i.e., how actors compete to make exclusive claims to perform certain activities). We turn to the literature on professions and occupations to draw out theoretical and empirical intersections with research advocating routine dynamics. The analytical framework, comprised of a becoming lens, a doing lens and a relating lens corresponds with and provides the basis to advance research themes within routine dynamics. We suggest that a stronger emphasis on occupations and professions holds promise for deepening knowledge about routine dynamics, which we articulate by proposing several avenues for future research, including the expansion of the concept of routines and a distinction between organizational and professional routines.
Anja Danner-Schröder
added an update
Hope you like our chapter in the Handbook of Routine Dynamics :-)
In this chapter, we examine the contribution of routine dynamics studies toward the management of unexpected events. In particular, we explore how routine dynamics studies have extended our insights into flexible coordination in the face of the unexpected and how such a perspective generates novel insights into the way people make sense of unexpected events, how they mindfully operate during the occurrence of unexpected events, and how improvisation is enacted as routine performance. In this review, we connect routine dynamics studies with research on crisis management and discuss how a routine dynamics perspective expands the research agenda for the management of unexpected events and crises.
 
Conor Horan
added an update
Dear colleagues, it’s my pleasure to announce and invite you to the next Routines.Research.Community meeting to be hosted virtually from Technological University Dublin (TU Dublin https://www.tudublin.ie/ ), Ireland (the last week of March – first week of April 2021). The final date and focus of the meeting will be confirmed in due course.
If you would like to include an agenda item for the Dublin meeting please let me know. Indeed if you would like to speak on a specific topic, present research in progress (PhD research), or indeed chair a breakout session (which we are planning) don’t hesitate to reach out. For now please pencil the suggested timeframe into your diary.
If you have any questions, please send me an email: conor.horan@tudublin.ie
Best wishes from a surprisingly sunny Dublin.
Take care and stay safe!
Conor
 
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
We are excited to announce that the Handbook has now been finalized and will be in print summer next year. We have 37 chapters by 51 authors from 17 different countries across the world. Attached is a sneak preview with the content as well as the Preface to the handbook and the introductory chapter "What is Routine Dynamics?" Please enjoy!!
Martha, Brian, Luciana, Claus, David and Katharina
 
Maria Esther Christina Booth
added an update
Hi all,
I am happy to present the programme for the routines research community meeting on Friday 23/10. The meeting is held digitally (on Zoom), starts at 13.00 and is scheduled to end by 17.
13.00-13.15 Welcome and introductions
13.15-13.45 Key-note by Luciana D'Adderio on doing research on AI and routines
13.45-14.15 Practitioner talk by Ulrika Jägare, Head of AI/ML Strategy Execution at Ericsson
14.15-14.45 Panel discussion between Luciana, Ulrika and Kathrin Sele
14.45-15.00 Break
15.00-16.30 Research idea pitches
16.30-17.00 Community stuff
The times above are indications and might move slightly.
I will send out a zoom-link later today to those who have signed up already. If you haven't yet signed up, but wish to participate, please mail me at maria.booth@hhs.se.
There are also a couple of slots available for the research pitches, so if you want to pitch your idea to get feedback from the community, just let me know and I'll schedule you.
Best,
Maria
 
Christian Alexander Mahringer
added a research item
In research on process organization studies, the concept of multiplicity is widely used, but a fundamental confusion about what process multiplicity means persists. As a result, we miss some of the potential of this concept for understanding process dynamics and process change. In this paper, we define process multiplicity as a duality of ‘one’ and ‘many’, and we conceptualize ‘the many’ as a space of possible paths encompassed by a process. We use the notion of paths to operationalize process multiplicity and make it accessible for empirical research. When we see process as a multiplicity, process change can be understood as expanding, shifting or contracting the space of possible paths. We suggest that this concept of process multiplicity also has implications for a range of other theoretical and practical topics, including standards, standardization and flexibility as well as process replication, management and resilience.
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added an update
For those interested in taking routines research into other communities, I thought to share the upcoming EGOS 2021 Sub-theme 63: Pragmatism and organizing for change:
Pragmatism and routines have a deep connection. From Simon drawing on pragmatists Dewey and James for the concept of routines, to Cohen (2007), Winter (2013), Dionysiou & Tsoukas (2013) and Simpson & Lorino (2015) some key literature for routines has drawn on pragmatism (for an overview have a look at the forthcoming handbook chapter by Dionysiou).
But arguably, routines also has a lot to tell towards pragmatism and the wider issue of the EGOS 2021 theme "Organizing for an Inclusive Society". So, I would like to encourage routines scholars to consider submitting a paper to this track, to showcase the relevance of routines for other communities as well.
 
Bastian Wurm
added a research item
The fields of business process management and routine dynamics both investigate organizational processes. However, the lexicons, methods, and aims of these disciplines are very different from one another. In this chapter, we reflect on both disciplines to outline similarities and differences. We introduce the reader to the BPM life cycle and explain how computational techniques from business process management can be used to investigate organizational routines. We hope that this will be a first step in bringing both disciplines closer to one another.
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
Hope this chapter is useful for many of you:
"Organizational ethnography has been crucial for the development of the field of Routine Dynamics since the beginning. It has altered the grain size of analysis and shifted the focus from the firm and its routines to the routine and the people, actions and artefacts that bring it to life. The discovery-oriented nature of ethnographic research has and continues to challenge the conceived wisdom of routines and their role in organizations. The majority of work in Routine Dynamics relies on ethnographic approaches and sensibilities. In this chapter, I review 45 studies and the various ways in which they draw on ethnography. Despite the wide variety of settings these studies have explored and the evidentiary approaches they draw on, I argue that Routine Dynamics research can draw on more novel and innovative forms of ethnographic research. This will allow scholars to address hitherto neglected aspects of routines, such as their emotional and aesthetic qualities, new contemporary phenomena that are of societal concern, such as inequality, climate change and epidemics, and make Routine Dynamics research more practically relevant."
 
Maria Esther Christina Booth
added an update
The House of Innovation at the Stockholm School of Economics is organising an interesting digital event for Digital Day on October 2nd. The event goes on all day and includes interesting speakers and discussions on things such as smart regions, smart organisations and smart global knowledge networks.
It is free and open to everyone who registers. You can attend as many or few sessions as you like.
Just follow the link below to have a look at the programme and register!
 
Emre Karali
added a research item
I review the routine dynamics literature from a professional identity perspective. Little research has been carried out in this area, although important insights can be acquired from understanding the dynamics of routine enactment through routine participants' professional identities. I discuss how routines and routine participants' professional identities are mutually constitutive, meaning that change in one can lead to change in the other, and vice versa. I propose future research that can help us to better understand stability and change in routines, and what effect stability and change in routines can have on routine participants' professional identities.
Dehua Gao
added a research item
[Prelimary abstract] The development of routine dynamics entails both a theoretical shift and changes in methodology. Agent-based modeling (ABM) offers an approach to enriching our understandings of routine dynamics from the ‘bottom-up’. This chapter provides an overview of ABM methodology in routine dynamics research. It includes a comparison of the eleven contemporary agent-based models (ABMs) selected from literature, a summary of research challenges and reflections on future work. As this chapter shows, we can differentiate ABMs in routine dynamics based on levels of analysis and concrete research questions. Further, developing empirically grounded ABMs will be a challenging but worthwhile effort. Attached is an author-draft version.
Waldemar Kremser
added a project reference
Maria Esther Christina Booth
added an update
Dear all,
The programme for the upcoming Routines Research Community meeting is starting to come together! The meeting will take place in the afternoon (CET) on October 23rd on Zoom. Exact times, programme and links will follow within shortly, but we can already reveal that it will include some exciting items; for example a key-note by Luciana D'Adderio and a practitioner talk by Ulrika Jägare, the head of AI/ML strategy execution at Ericsson.
To participate, please send me a mail at maria.booth@hhs.se.
If you would like to host a round table or pitch a research idea, please send me a mail as soon as possible. More research ideas/round table topics = more interesting discussions, so don't be shy!
The meeting will take place entirely on Zoom, but if anybody would like to join me and a few other local colleagues for drinks in the evening (of course depending on the covid-situation at the moment), just let me know and we'll include you in the arrangements.
Best,
Maria
 
Conor Horan
added an update
Network Perspectives on Resource Interaction
Several perspectives within marketing theory are currently actively debating the importance of resources in business networks. The dynamic and evolutionary nature of resources as an essential driver of value and exchange processes is underlined. This Special Issue seeks to provide a forum for discussions about resource combinations and connections occurring across organizations/actors, investigated by means of various network perspectives. Resource Interaction is one such perspective. Anchored in Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP), it focuses on how technical and organizational resources obtain value through how they are combined with other resources mostly external to the firm in network settings (Håkansson and Waluszewski, 2002; Baraldi, Gressetvold and Harrison, 2012; Lind, 2015; Prenkert, Hasche and Linton, 2019). Other contemporary perspectives discussing resources include; resource integration in ecosystems (within Service-Dominant Logic, S-D Logic) (Caridà, Edvardsson and Colurcio, 2019; Kleinaltenkamp et al., 2012; Vargo and Lusch, 2010; 2017), and resources and capabilities within Servitization (Raddats et al, 2019).
Submissions to the Special Issue can be both conceptual and empirical and should contribute to better understanding the development and use of resources in a network context, focusing on such areas as, but not limited to, innovation management, business strategy, logistics, accounting, supply management, B2B marketing, environmental sustainability and digitalization. To simulate fruitful discussions and cross-fertilization we encourage submissions taking a variety of theoretical perspectives on interacting resources, for example Resource Interaction, Social Network Analysis, Actor-Network Theory (ANT), S-D Logic and Servitization. We also welcome submissions adopting a wide range of methods, including for instance case studies, qualitative comparative analyses of multiple cases, quantitative studies and agent-based simulations.
Specific questions include but are not limited to:
-Which are the core concepts necessary to understand resource interaction, both when it comes to the properties of single resources and of their interactions and combinations?
-How might knowledge and capabilities, and other immaterial resources, such be conceptualized from an interactive network perspective?
-How might we capture the complex and emergent nature of resources methodologically? Are there quantitative and/or mixed methods that investigate some particular features, practices or processes of how resource combining?
- How is value conceived of and created around specific resources, and which actors are better equipped to appropriate such value and why?
- How does a start-up or new venture actor assemble resources in creating a scalable business model?
- What are the drivers and barriers to combining and integrating resources, and which roles do actors play in overcoming relevant challenges?
-What managerial and policy implications derive from value-creation processes involving resources?
References
Baraldi, E., Gressetvold, E., and Harrison, D. (2012) Resource interaction in inter-organizational networks: Foundations, comparison and a research agenda. Journal of Business Research, 65 (2), p266-276.
Caridà, A., Edvardsson, B. and Colurcio, M. (2019) “Conceptualizing resource integration as an embedded process: Matching, resourcing and valuing”. Marketing Theory, 19 (1), p65-84.
Håkansson, H. and Waluszewski, A. (2002) Managing technological development – IKEA, the environment and technology. London: Routledge.
Kleinaltenkamp, M., Brodie, R.J., Frow, P., Hughes, T., Peters, L.D. and Woratschek, H. (2012) “Resource Integration”. Marketing Theory, 12(2), p201–205.
Lind, F. (2015) “Goal diversity and resource development in an inter-organisational project”. Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, 30 (3/4), p259-268.
Prenkert, F., Hasche, N. and Linton, G. (2019) “Towards a systematic analytical framework of resource interfaces”. Journal of Business Research, 100, p139-149.
Raddats, C., Kowalkowski, C., Benedettini, O., Burton, J. and Gebauer, H. (2019) “Servitization: A contemporary thematic review of four major research streams”. Industrial Marketing Management. In Press.
Vargo, S.L. and Lusch, R.F. (2010) “’Relationship’ in Transition: An Introduction to the Special Issue on Relationship and Service-Dominant Logic”. Journal of Business Market Management, 4, p167–168.
Vargo, S.L. and Lusch, R.F. (2017) “Service-dominant logic 2025”. International Journal of Research in Marketing, 34, p46–67.
Guest editors:
Debbie Harrison, Enrico Baraldi, Johan Kask and Milena Ratajczak-Mrozek
Deadlines
There is an open call for papers for the Special Issue.
In addition, two key conferences that will be sources for papers for the Special Issue. The European Academy of Management (EURAM) conference 2020 takes place June 10-12 2020 and the IMP conference takes place September 1-4 2020.
Manuscripts should be prepared following the JBR guidelines.
Submission deadline: February 28th 2021
 
Rodrigo Assunção Rosa
added a research item
In this chapter, we review the literature on interdependent routines. We group previous studies on routine interdependence around key concepts-boundaries & intersections, clusters, ecologies, and bundles-and highlight the different analytical foci and results of each group. Hence, we make an argument for leveraging the analytical differences of such concepts as cluster and ecologies, rather than treating them as synonyms. In closing, we point out several avenues for future research.
Christian Alexander Mahringer
added a research item
Implicitly or explicitly, sequence analysis is at the heart of research on routine dynamics. Sequence analysis takes many forms in many different disciplines, because sequence is central to temporality, process, language, and narrative. In this chapter, we focus on sequence analysis in routine dynamics research. The goal of this chapter is to help researchers use sequence analysis in their research on routine dynamics. Hence, the chapter reviews prior literature that has used sequence analysis, it shows how to carry out sequence analysis and it provides implications as well as an agenda for future research.
F. Deken
added 2 research items
In this chapter we focus on organizational routines for innovation work. We counter the view that routines and innovation are an unlikely couple. Emphasizing that innovation work is characterized by emergence, dispersed collaboration between heterogeneous actors, and novelty, we are beginning to see how mundane actions—as opposed to grand creative acts—and the interplay between routines and standard operating procedures are driving the development of innovations-in-the-making. We review empirical routine dynamic studies of innovation work to point out affordances of the routine dynamic lens and suggest new avenues for studying innovation work to contribute new theoretical insights about organizational routines.
Kathrin Sele
added a research item
Actor-network theory has always been an inspiring theoretical and methodological source for Routine Dynamics research. Seeing routines as networks of actants and as a consequence rather than a cause of collective action enabled scholars to move away from a priori assumptions about the world and shift their attention to situated performances, multiplicity, and connections-in action. In this chapter, I provide a brief historical account of actor-network theory highlighting some of its central authors and their work before unravelling how Routine Dynamics scholars have appropriated it—ironically, often as an undercover actor that remains invisible at first sight—and conclude by reflecting on how actor-network theory can continue to be of use for and shape Routine Dynamics research.
F. Deken
added an update
Together with Brian Pentland @Jörg Sydow, we are convening a routine dynamics track at EGOS 2021 at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Please find attached the call for papers. We hope you will submit to our track and look forward to inspiring conversations!
Routine dynamics: Relating micro-actions and organizational outcomes
Over the past 20 years, routine dynamics research has matured and provided a solid foundation for understanding organizational routines as ‘patterns of action’ that generate a broad range of outcomes, including stability and change. We argue that the routine dynamics literature can provide promising foundations for addressing recent calls from practice-based scholars to connect micro-level actions to meso and macro-level processes and outcomes. In this sub-theme, we aim to bring together practice-based scholars, including those studying strategy, collaboration, innovation, technology, and institutions, to deepen our understanding of how the conceptual foundations of the routine dynamics literature can support scholars to empirically study how micro-actions connect to organizational outcomes, while striving for both rigor and relevance in our research.
 
Maria Esther Christina Booth
added an update
Dear all,
We are currently planning the next routines research community meeting which will be held digitally (in Stockholm) on the exciting theme of Routines and AI. The meeting will take place sometime mid to end October, but the exact date is yet to be confirmed. If you would like to host a round table, present early work or pitch a research idea at the idea bazaar, please let me know at maria.booth@hhs.se!
Best,
Maria
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added 2 research items
In this chapter we set out to analyze the rich and diverse stream which makes up the topic of routines as truces. This involves addressing not only those contributions which directly deal with the construct of truces and their dynamics, but also those for which truces might not be the central focus but which have contributed to our understanding of truce dynamics through the lens of related concepts. These topics include the influence of conflicting interests, goals and motivations; the emergence and resolution of tensions and struggles between and across organizational communities and culture(s); and the role of artifacts and materiality in addressing organizational conflict.
This chapter considers how the Routine Dynamics debate around technology, artifacts and materiality has evolved over the course of the past two decades. In reviewing the progress achieved so far, I show how the field is gearing up to address the important challenges posed by new forms of artifacts and technology, and new ways of organizing. In so doing, I discuss how the latest advances in routines and materiality (artifacts at the centre, performativity and multiplicity/fluid ontology) can help us address the theoretical, methodological and empirical challenges raised by contemporary material phenomena. I conclude by laying out an agenda for future studies of routines, technology, artifacts and materiality.
Waldemar Kremser
added 4 project references
Waldemar Kremser
added a research item
In this ethnographic study of firefighters we explore how routines are coordinated under high levels of temporal uncertainty-when the timing of critical events cannot be known in advance and temporal misalignment creates substantial risks. Such conditions render time-consuming incremental and situated forms of temporal structuring-the focus of previous research on temporal coordination-unfeasible. Our findings show that firefighters focused their efforts on enacting temporal autonomy or, as they called it, ''getting ahead of time.'' They gained temporal autonomy-the capacity to temporally uncouple from the unfolding situation to preserve the ability to adapt to autonomously selected events-by relying on rhythms they developed during training in performing individual routines and by opening up to the evolving situation only when transitioning between routines. Our study contributes to literature on temporal structuring by introducing temporal autonomy as a novel strategy for dealing with temporal contingencies. We also contribute to research on routine dynamics by introducing the performance of temporal boundaries as a previously unrecognized form of coordination within and among routines. Finally, we contribute to process research a method that allows analyzing complex temporal patterns and thus provides a novel way of visualizing processes.
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
Delighted to attach the temporary download link to this new article
thanks for reading!
Luciana.
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
Kathrin Sele
added an update
Join us for an exiting conference!
The sub-theme on Routine Dynamics is crafted for authors and co-authors of accepted papers. However, due to the virtual format, EGOS is allowing members of the wider Routine Dynamics community to also participate (without presenting their own work).
Our expectation is that all participants with and without a paper participate in the entire program (see attached program), including virtual breakout discussions and giving feedback on three papers. In order to adapt to the virtual nature of the Colloquium, the sub-theme will unfold through nine paper sessions and three plenary sessions. The Routine Dynamics community is vibrant and international with participants distributed across multiple time-zones. Our hope is that during the virtual conference you will be willing to wake up early and stay up late a few times to bring the community together.
If you are interested, get in touch with us as spaces are limited.
The “symbolic” registration fee for the virtual 36th EGOS Colloquium 2020 is EUR 10. Please note: to be entitled to register for the Colloquium you must have an EGOS membership (EUR 125) which is valid at the time this virtual conference will take place.
Best wishes,
Martha, Claus and Kathrin
 
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added an update
For those that have missed the open governance meeting, we have a refined identity statement:
"We are an informal and collaborative incubator for research on organizational phenomena of societal concern, such as new forms of organizing, grand challenges, artificial intelligence, organizational design etc. For this, we believe that dialogue and collaboration with practice are essential. We study organizational phenomena through a routine dynamics lens, e.g. focusing on actions, practices and tools. We are creating research rather than disseminating finished work; a forum for asking questions, not just presenting answers."
Should you have any questions, please let me know.
 
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added an update
Thanks to the collaboration between Routines.Research.Community, Delft University of Technology, and Livework Studio, we had 285 sign-up, 125 people join, and even after 4 hours still 70 people hanging around. I guess this shows there is plenty of interested in practice for routines, and that we can keep a big crowd engaged for quite some time. Thx all for your contribution!
Missed the workshop?
  1. My faculty posted a little news item with some key insights: https://www.tudelft.nl/en/2020/io/june/routine-dynamics-meets-service-design/
  2. We started a LinkedIn Group to engage between theory and practice. Interested? Then check: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12425217/
  3. Wanna see the real deal, the introduction and the keynotes can be found on Vimeo (will post link once its uploaded...)
Let me know if you have any comments about the day. It was a challenging set-up between organization & design and theory & practice. I hope everybody has some insights and some new questions that can feel a dialogue.
I was very glad with the participation of so many of you, and the willingness to experiment in this extreme corona situation.
Looking forward to organizing a "real" workshop at the TU Delft, with service design training, idea bazaar, real roundtables and plenty of social time.
Kind regards,
Frithjof
 
Luciana D'Adderio
added an update
Full text of this paper now available for download here on RG.
 
Waldemar Kremser
added an update
On May 19, we had our annual Open Governance Meeting. 18 routine dynamics scholars from 10 different countries grappled with the tension between stability and change which is not just at the heart of our research, but also at the heart of our community life. Attached you can find our decision protocoll and a virtual group picture.
If you are interested in how great RD resarch can look like: Please join us on June 15 for the (online) PhD defense from Maria Esther Christina Booth on how artifactual representations of routines shape routine performances (Opponent: Luciana D'Adderio): https://www.hhs.se/en/about-us/calendar/dissertations/2020/phd-dissertation-maria-booth/
Cheeers,
Waldemar
 
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added an update
Dear all,
250+ people have signed up for tomorrow's workshop on "Routine Dynamics meets Service Design"! If you don't wanna miss out on this unique opportunity to delve into the world of service design, then please consider signing up: https://www.liveworkstudio.com/events/routine-dynamics-meets-service-design/
Still not convinced? How about:
  • A keynote by Brian Pentland on the "shape of your work"
  • A keynote by Livework Studio on how they use service design to change organizations and routines
  • Roundtables on Sustainability (with Katharina Dittrich ), Digitalisation (with Hans Berends ) and Routine Design (with Vern Glaser )
  • And lots of interaction with practitioners from Service Design and Organizational Change
Give into your FOMO and come join us!
Looking forward to see many of you tomorrow!
Kind regards,
Frithjof Wegener
 
Brian Pentland
added an update
I am excited about our forthcoming paper on process dynamics.
THEORIZING PROCESS DYNAMICS WITH DIRECTED GRAPHS: A DIACHRONIC ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL TRACE DATA
Accepted for publication in MIS Quarterly
Brian T. Pentland
Michigan State University
Emmanuelle Vaast
McGill University
Julie Ryan Wolf
University of Rochester
Abstract: The growing availability of digital trace data has generated unprecedented opportunities for analyzing, explaining, and predicting the dynamics of process change. While research on process organization studies theorizes about process and change, and research on process mining rigorously measures and models business processes, there has so far been limited research that measures and theorizes about process dynamics. This gap represents an opportunity for new Information Systems (IS) research. This research note lays the foundation for such an endeavor by demonstrating the use of process mining for diachronic analysis of process dynamics. We detail the definitions, assumptions, and mechanics of an approach that is based on representing processes as weighted, directed graphs. Using this representation, we offer a precise definition of process dynamics that focuses attention on describing and measuring changes in process structure over time. We analyze process structure over two years at four dermatology clinics. Our analysis reveals process changes that were invisible to the medical staff in the clinics. This approach offers empirical insights that are relevant to many theoretical perspectives on process dynamics.
 
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added an update
Most of you should have gotten this as well through Mailchimp, but just to make sure:
Please use this link to sign-up for the workshop on 28th May 2020, also if you already emailed me that you will come
We use this registration form to send out the zoom link later, but also to split up people across the roundtables.
Looking forward to seeing you online on the 28th of May!
 
Katharina Dittrich
added an update
Dear all,
I am are seeking to recruit a PhD and postdoctoral research fellow to work on a research project funded by the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) Future Leaders Fellowship scheme on the theme of “Management insights for tackling grand challenges: the case of climate-related financial risks in the financial investment industry”
This is an exciting opportunity to
· Conduct research on a pressing societal concern (climate change)
· Develop real-world impact
· Work with a team of highly committed and motivated researchers
· Be part of a thriving community of organisational researchers working with practice, process and institutional approaches
· Develop your academic career and network
More information about the PhD position can be found here (bottom right corner): https://www.wbs.ac.uk/courses/doctoral/phd/fees/#more
My best wishes
Katharina
 
Kathrin Sele
added an update
We bring together scholars from different organizational perspectives to explore the phenomenon of artificial intelligence and algorithms from multiple theoretical lenses, including the associated methodological challenges and opportunities. After short presentations by our panelists and a panel discussion, work in progress and project ideas will be discussed in small roundtables.
Panelists:
Luciana D'Adderio, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Samer Faraj, McGill University, Canada
Thomas Gegenhuber, Leuphana University, Germany
Bob Hinings, University of Calgary, Canada
Ruthanne Huising, emlyon business school, France
Neil Pollock, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
New submission deadline: May 15, 2020
More information can be found here: http://bit.ly/PDW4AlgorithmsOrganizing
 
Rodrigo Assunção Rosa
added an update
Dear Community,
As mentioned earlier, one of the projects we discussed in past meetings would be to create a repository with the list of most recent publications on routine dynamics. Therefore, Private Profile and I did a new search for the papers published in 2020 (Q1).
Again, it is very interesting to observe the plurality of perspectives that our community is reaching!
You can view the list of publications on the following website or download the attached document.
Any contribution is welcome!
If there is any missing paper, please let us know and we will check if any errors occurred in our search.
 
Anja Danner-Schröder
added an update
Dear All,
Matthias Wenzel, Paul Spee and I have published a paper that might be of interest for our group as we propose to draw on a practice-based understanding of organizational routines to unravel the “dynamics” of dynamic capabilities. Here is the link:
Abstract
The current conceptualization of dynamic capabilities entails a paradox, one that hampers the achievement of one of the framework’s main missions: While studies on dynamic capabilities claim to offer explanations of continuous, routine-based organizational change, their prevalent conceptualization of organizational routines is rather undynamic and less prone to change. Thus, we propose to draw on an alternative, practice-based understanding of organizational routines to unravel the “dynamics” of dynamic capabilities. The practice perspective captures and explains the internal dynamics of organizational routines and positions the performance of organizational routines as a source of both organizational stability and change. This perspective offers to deepen our understanding of the dynamics within dynamic capabilities as driver of routine-based organizational change. To foster a research agenda that advances our understanding of dynamic capabilities from a practice perspective on organizational routines, we provide onto-epistemological, theoretical, and methodological implications of such a “dynamic view” of dynamic capabilities.
 
Frithjof Eberhard Wegener
added an update
Dear colleagues,
It is my distinct pleasure to finally send you this invitation (I will also send it through Mailchimp) to a workshop relevant for those interested in routine dynamics and service design, where we bring together:
  • service designers
  • people studying service design
  • routine dynamics scholars
What do we do?
Keynotes on Service Design and Organizational Change (Livework Studio) and the “shape” of your work by Brian Pentland. Round-tables on sustainability, digitalisation and routine design.
Why is service design relevant to routine dynamics? Arguably, designing services touches upon organizational change and the design, or intentional change, of routines. Design and routines has has been implicitly (Bucher & Langley, 2016; Dittrich & Seidl, 2018) and explicitly (Glaser, 2017; Pentland & Feldman, 2008), pointing to the challenges of intentional organizational change, but also some opportunities. Interestingly, a key challenge of service design is the organizational changes needed, meaning a large percentage of service designs are not implemented. Let's learn from each other, how service designers deal with routine dynamics and how routine dynamics might enlighten service design.
Who comes?
We have leading service design practitioners (e.g. Livework Studio) and service design scholars joining us. Representatives of companies like Bosch, Yanfeng, Adidas and JP Morgan will join as well. But now what I need is you! Routine dynamics scholars and people more broadly interested in organizing and designing. 
“Location”
I will set-up a Zoom meeting, including breakout rooms for the round tables.
Time
28 May 2020, 14h-17h Central European Time