Project

Robert C. Gardner's Legacy

Goal: Second language motivation scholars reflecting on the legacy of the father of the field and extending it.

Updates
0 new
0
Recommendations
0 new
0
Followers
0 new
95
Reads
2 new
981

Project log

Ali H. Al-Hoorie
added a research item
Motivating students is an important concern for language teachers. One of the most direct ways to motivate students is for the teacher to talk them into it. This study investigates the effectiveness of narrating inspirational stories about successful role models on motivating a sample of Saudi university learners of English (N = 270). Teachers of the experimental group told their students motivational stories about famous people associated with the English culture as a warm-up activity for a period of about four weeks. Results of t-tests showed that the experimental group reported a significant reduction in anxiety (d = 0.41). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in integrativeness, motivation, or attitudes toward the learning situation. The role of creating role models for language learners is discussed in light of the present results.
Ali H. Al-Hoorie
added 2 research items
Some 60 years ago, Gardner and Lambert’s (1959) seminal paper, ‘Motivational variables in second language acquisition’, was published in the Canadian Journal of Psychology. The paper totaled seven pages with 20 references, yet its impact on the study of motivation in second language learning has been immeasurable. The 1959 paper represents the beginning of the work on the socioeducational model and its centerpiece, the integrative motive. In introducing this festschrift, we pause to reflect on the contributions the work has inspired and its place in the body of motivation research. This volume also stands as a tribute to Robert (Bob) C. Gardner – the father of language motivation – as a teacher, researcher and scholar of language. Few scholars in the area can match the intensity of his research productivity over six decades.
Ali H. Al-Hoorie
added 2 research items
This book brings together contributions from the leaders of the language learning motivation field. The varied chapters demonstrate how Gardner's work remains integral to a diverse range of contemporary theoretical issues underlying the psychology of language, even today, 60 years after the publication of Gardner and Lambert's seminal 1959 paper. The chapters cover a wide selection of topics related to applied linguistics, second language acquisition, social psychology, sociology, methodology and historical issues. The book advances thinking on cutting-edge topics in these diverse areas, providing a wealth of information for both students and established scholars that show the continuing and future importance of Gardner and Lambert's ideas.
Jessica Ross
added a research item
In Gardner’s Socio-Educational Model, motivation for language learning is supported by attitudes toward the language, the learning situation, and joining a valued community. Gardner used the term ‘affective’ factors to describe the interrelations among the multiple interacting motivational processes involved, with particular emphasis on attitudes as the key support for motivation. The study of emotions in mainstream psychology was not a prominent concern during the development of the SE Model, and the role of various emotions in the model has not been explored in detail. Over the past 10 years, however, developments in emotion theory have generated potentially exciting new directions for research. Arguably the most relevant findings involve distinguishing the different functions of positive and negative emotions; they do not work in a see saw relationship, showing instead somewhat independent contributions to motivation. In this presentation we will review key theoretical, measurement, and empirical implications of developments in the study of emotions for the SE Model. First, theoretically, we will argue that the relevant processes are so intertwined that emotion is motivation. Second, although measurement of concepts has been a particular strength of the SE Model over time, developments in emotion theory suggest additional interpretation is needed for the measurement strategy of using balanced item keying. Finally, to solidify the augment that emotions are central to the SE model, data from three studies will be presented to show the breadth and strength of the empirical relationships between various emotions and elements of the SE Model.
Peter Macintyre
added a research item
R. C. Gardner’s work continues to exert an influence on applied linguistics. It was never just about integrative vs instrumental motives. Gardner’s socio-educational model is context sensitive, social-psychological approach to dealing with the social, political, and psychological dimensions of language learning. In this presentation, we review 3 studies that link to currents of thought in research, focus on studies connected to positive psychology in SLA: Attitudes and emotions, Implications for teacher strengths, and social capital.
Jean-Marc Dewaele
added a research item
Gardner’s work continues to exert an influence on applied linguistics It was never just about integrative vs instrumental motives Gardner’s socio-educational model was context sensitive, social-psychological approach to dealing with the social, political, and psychological dimensions of language learning. We review 3 studies that link to currents of thought in research, focus on studies connected to positive psychology in SLA 1) Attitudes and emotions 2) Implications for teacher strengths 3) Social capital
Ali H. Al-Hoorie
added a research item
This presentation surveys the different stages that the L2 motivation field has passed through to date. This presentation sets the scene for the following presentations in this symposium.
Ali H. Al-Hoorie
added 3 research items
This symposium celebrates the legacy and continuing influence of Robert C. Gardner, the father of the L2 motivation field, at the 60th anniversary of the seminal paper by Gardner and Lambert (1959). Gardner’s contributions go beyond the one-dimensional integrative–instrumental dichotomy. A group of distinguished scholars were invited to contribute to this symposium, each addressing a dimension of Gardner’s contributions that links directly to contemporary developments in SLA theory and research. The topics come from diverse disciplinary perspectives, instantiating the extensive influence of Gardner’s work. The presentations feature issues spanning macro-level processes of intergroup relations and social harmony to micro-level processes of intra-individual development and emotional reactions. Few SLA theorists have had such far-reaching influence. Each presentation takes Gardner’s work in a new direction. Oxford discusses the oft-neglected but pervasive issue of time perspectives, showing that Gardner’s writings contribute to the discussion of time. Clément and Rubenfeld tackle Gardner’s influence on intergroup theory with application that ultimately contribute to social harmony. Noels links Gardner’s theory to the organismic-dialectical processes within self-determination theory, showing compatibility across theoretical domains. Norton critically examines her concept of investment and its relation to Gardner’s theorizing of motivation. Further building on Gardner’s work on affect, Lantolf proposes a Vygotskian perspective on emotion called Perezhivanie. Finally, MacIntyre, Gregersen and Dewaele examine basic emotions and how they connect to attitudinal supports for language motivation. To draw it all together and open the conversation, Elaine Horwitz will be the discussant for the symposium. This inspiring collection of papers will be a unique experience for the audience, taking the field toward exciting new directions, even as we celebrate the first 60 years of Gardner’s contributions.
This symposium celebrates the legacy and continuing influence of Robert C. Gardner, the father of the L2 motivation field, at the 60th anniversary of the seminal paper by Gardner and Lambert (1959). Gardner's contributions go beyond the one-dimensional integrative-instrumental dichotomy. A group of distinguished scholars were invited to contribute to this symposium, each addressing a dimension of Gardner's contributions that links directly to contemporary developments in SLA theory and research. The topics come from diverse disciplinary perspectives, instantiating the extensive influence of Gardner's work. The presentations feature issues spanning macro-level processes of intergroup relations and social harmony to micro-level processes of intra-individual development and emotional reactions. Few SLA theorists have had such far-reaching influence. Each presentation takes Gardner's work in a new direction. Noels describes the richness of the socio-educational model and links it to self-determination theory. Oxford discusses the oft-neglected but pervasive issue of time perspectives, showing that Gardner's writings contribute to the discussion of time. Ushioda reflects on the evolution of her methodological thinking and how it was influenced by Gardner's approach. Finally, MacIntyre, Dewaele, and Gregersen expand Gardner's work on emotions. This inspiring collection of papers will be a unique experience for the audience, taking the field toward exciting new directions, even as we celebrate the first 60 years of Gardner's contributions. Summary A group of distinguished scholars discuss the contributions of Robert C. Gardner at the 60th anniversary of the seminal paper by Gardner and Lambert (1959) that founded the L2 motivation field. Each scholar deals with a dimension of Gardner's contributions, linking it to contemporary theory and empirical evidence.
This symposium celebrates the legacy and continuing influence of Robert C. Gardner, the father of the second language (L2) motivation field, at the 60th anniversary of the seminal paper by Gardner and Lambert (1959). Gardner's contributions go beyond the one-dimensional integrative-instrumental dichotomy. A group of distinguished scholars were invited to contribute to this symposium, each addressing a dimension of Gardner's contributions that links directly to contemporary developments in second language acquisition (SLA) theory and research. The topics come from diverse disciplinary perspectives, instantiating the extensive influence of Gardner's work. The presentations feature issues spanning macro-level processes of intergroup relations and social harmony to micro-level processes of intra-individual development and emotional reactions. Few SLA theorists have had such far-reaching influence. Each presentation takes Gardner's work in a new direction. Taylor discusses the role of language in collective identity as opposed to the popular individual difference approach. Clément and Rubenfeld explore the motivation to learn a second language and how it can become a cultural mediator in conflict situations. Noels and colleagues offer an update on the Language Learning Orientations Scale, while Dewaele discusses his research findings in relation to willingness to communicate. Finally, MacIntyre and Ross discuss the relationship between Gardner's model and the important question of emotions. This inspiring collection of papers will be a unique experience for the audience, taking the field toward exciting new directions, even as we celebrate the first 60 years of Gardner's contributions.
Ali H. Al-Hoorie
added a project goal
Second language motivation scholars reflecting on the legacy of the father of the field and extending it.