Project

Rheologically optimized 2D-material-based inks (RheoOptimized2Dinks)

Goal: The final aim of this project is to optimize the printability of 2D-material-based (graphene, TMDs, and h-BN) inks to overcome the current limitations related with printed electronics and allow them going from niche to mainstream market. We will perform an in-depth rheological characterization of new formulations and 2D-inks currently available
in the literature for printed electronics. The three processes associated with the inkjet printing technologies (continuous inkjet printing, drop-on-demand, and electroestatic inkjet printing) will be assessed in terms of fluidic deficiencies by a thorough fluid-flow characterization at lab-scale.

Date: 27 July 2018 - 26 July 2021

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Project log

Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales
added a research item
It is a common practice to add rheology modifiers to functional inks, such as graphene inks, to optimize the rheological properties so that they can be printed with a certain printing technique. This practice may lead to inks formulations with poorer electrical, optical, and mechanical performance upon its application, which are of paramount importance in printed electronics. In this study, we demonstrate for three different commercial graphene-based inks that it is possible to control the amount of ink transferred to the flat surface by tweaking printing parameters, such as the velocity and the length scale of the gravure cell, without modifying the rheology of the ink. Finally, the results are summarized in printing maps based on dimensionless numbers, namely, the capillary and Reynolds numbers.
Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales
added a research item
Uniaxial extensional flow is a canonical flow typically used in rheological characterization to provide complementary information to that obtained by imposing simple shear flow. In spite of the importance of having a full rheological characterization of complex fluids, publications on the rheological characterization of mobile liquids under extensional flow have increased significantly only in the last 20 years. In the case of the rheological characterization of electrorheological fluids, the situation is even more dramatic, as the ERFs have been exclusively determined under simple shear flow, where an electrorheological cell is attached to the rotational rheometer generating an electric field perpendicular to the flow direction and that does not allow for inverting the polarity. The very recent work published by Sadek et al. [1,2], who developed a new electrorheological cell to be used with the commercial Capillary Breakup Extensional Rheometer (CaBER), allows for the very first time performing electrorheometry under extensional flow. By means of the same experimental setup, this study investigates the influence of the polarity of the imposed electric field on the filament thinning process of a Newtonian and an electrorheological fluid. Results show that a polarity against the gravity results in filament thinning processes that live longer or reach a stable configuration at lower intensities of the applied electric field.
Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales
added a research item
A new electrorheological cell for the Capillary Breakup Extensional Rheometer (Haake™ CaBER 1™, Thermo Scientific) allowing the analysis of the rheological properties of complex fluids under the simultaneous application of an extensional flow and an electric field has been developed and tested. In this study, the add-on is described in full detail and different cornstarch suspensions in olive oil are characterized under different stretching conditions with and without an electric field. The results show that, under extensional flow and no electric field, the sample behaves as a Newtonian-like fluid, showing a linear relationship between time and filament minimum diameter. However, when the external electric field is imposed, the filament thinning process delays increasing the breakup time. If the external electric field is further increased, then the filament may even not break, depending on the imposed voltage, the Hencky strain, and the concentration of particles in the fluid sample.
Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales
added a research item
I would like to share with you that we are currently equipped in our research group with magnetorheological and electrorheological cells (both patents pending) specifically designed to work with the Capillary BreakUp Extensional Rheometer (CaBER). If you are interested in collaborating with us, please send me a message. "Capillary Breakup Extensional MagnetoRheometry". Accepted in Journal of Rheology (November, 2019) "Capillary Breakup Extensional ElectroRheometry (CaBEER)". Accepted in Journal of Rheology (November, 2019) "Extensional rheometry of magnetic dispersions". Journal of Rheology 59(1), 193-209 January/February (2015). Samir SadekHossein Hadi Najafabadi Laura Campo Deaño
Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales
added an update
 
Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales
added a project goal
The final aim of this project is to optimize the printability of 2D-material-based (graphene, TMDs, and h-BN) inks to overcome the current limitations related with printed electronics and allow them going from niche to mainstream market. We will perform an in-depth rheological characterization of new formulations and 2D-inks currently available
in the literature for printed electronics. The three processes associated with the inkjet printing technologies (continuous inkjet printing, drop-on-demand, and electroestatic inkjet printing) will be assessed in terms of fluidic deficiencies by a thorough fluid-flow characterization at lab-scale.